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Megaman
23-09-2004, 01:32 PM
Hi everyone. After finally giving up all hope of Linux on the old computer, and experiencing Knoppix on the new computer, I've decided to try a distro on the new computer. It's less than 3 years old, so I'm assuming it'll be good for most distros, but the problem I have is with Hard Drive space. It's a 40GB H/D, with C: 10GB (1GB free) and D: 28GB (7GB free), so it's all full. Getting a new computer is unlikely (But not impossible), so right now I'm guessing I'll have to resize D: (Which happens to be NTFS) to make room. So here's my question. I don't mind which distro it is, provided it can safely resize NTFS partitions. I can't use Partition Magic (Can't pay for it, and have no intention on a keygen), or if someone can tell me about any success stories about free partitioners it would be appreciated. Another possible solution is getting that DSE laptop (with no OS), loading windows XP, then one of the Distros I have at home, but only if there is no other way.

Hope that made some sense. If someone can help, that would ve great :)

Thanks, MM

metla
23-09-2004, 01:35 PM
You can get an entire range of notebooks without an OS,Look further afeild then DSE.

Clevo is a good starting point.

rmcb
23-09-2004, 02:03 PM
Most modern distros can resize NTFS. I know Mandrake 10 can for sure, have a look on your Knoppix cd for Qtparted it can do this also.
Lots of people here can help you with copys of Linux disks, just let us know which distro you want.......

Murray P
23-09-2004, 04:34 PM
Grab a 10 or 20GB disk form somewhere like trademe anywhere from $15 - 50 bucks.or a new 40GB Seagate 7200rpm for about $100.

That keeps it of your main data drive and alows you to create some windows partitions to use as storage.

Cheers Murray P

Megaman
23-09-2004, 05:26 PM
> Grab a 10 or 20GB disk form somewhere like trademe
> anywhere from $15 - 50 bucks.or a new 40GB Seagate
> 7200rpm for about $100.


The thing is my old computer has a relatively new 40GB hard drive. I would use that, but my computer's case is tiny (and uses a custom mobo, so I can't put in a PCI video card, or re-case it :()

Pete O\'Neil
23-09-2004, 05:28 PM
> The thing is my old computer has a relatively new
> 40GB hard drive. I would use that, but my computer's
> case is tiny (and uses a custom mobo, so I can't put
> in a PCI video card, or re-case it :()
Why dont u replace the 40Gb with something bigger then? harddrive arent that expensive.

Susan B
23-09-2004, 05:48 PM
I would highly recommend getting another smaller hard drive and a removable caddy to put it in rather than muck about with repartitioning and dual booting. You will also need to get a removable caddy for your existing hard drive so that you can swap between the two.

The only problem with that is you cannot access your data on your existing hard drive.

I have three hard drives - a fixed 80GB and two 80GB drives in removable caddies. When I want to play with Linux out comes the Windows XP drive and in goes the Fedora one. That way both Windows and Linux drives can access the data on the fixed HDD and if I have a bit of a hiccups with Linux it won't take Windows down with it like it did when I tried upgrading from Fedora Core 1 to Core 2.

JohnD
23-09-2004, 07:29 PM
I would (with respect) disagree with Susan (although I can see what she is saying). I have done dozens of Windows and Linux dual boot installs and have never had a situation (yet) that I could not recover from. I reckon the convenience of dual booting is great!

There was (is) a problem with the supplied NTFS resizing software with some (all) distributions - not sure if this is fixed. You need to research this first!

Chilling_Silence
24-09-2004, 10:15 AM
Yoper has a graphical non-destructive repartitioner during installation that can do NTFS no worries.....

Not sure where you're located, but Metla does a good deal on those Clevo's

Mzee
25-09-2004, 12:27 AM
I recently had Xandross on a 7 gig partition & it was fine.
Xandros installs on its own with very little input from you, finds all the hardware & set everything up correctley. It has a partition tool.

KevCole
25-09-2004, 02:30 AM
I am using a dual booted Athlon Mandrake 10 & win XP SP2. The mandrake program is great...very professional...except for major hiccup. 1. No concerted support for software/win modems.
2. The terminology/program installation learning curve is very steep.

beama
25-09-2004, 12:33 PM
I went the way the Susan described with a twist. I had a secondary drive installed with Redhat9 on it (this drive has also had Mandrake 8 installed on it and now I am considering a Debian release), then I just changed the boot order in the bios depending on which os I whated to use then I could mount the windows hdb (reason for b explained later) when ever I whated.
To install linux I took what could be called the chickens way out, I discontected the power and ide cable from the windows drive therefore making the secondary drive the only detectable drive. (requiring windows drive to be mounted as /dev/hdb ).
Windows never reconised the secound linux hand drive because it was a unknown file system, ext3 (but Ive since learned about samba, another project for rainy day).
I would go with a secound hard drive option, how you configured the install (hardware) is your choice.
Linux installs on laptops can be fun also, issues that come to mind and I have faced and not yet resolved all, touchpads and winmodems ( I got this one working with some help from the linux users in this forum).

Dolby Digital
25-09-2004, 02:42 PM
>> I have done dozens of Windows and Linux dual boot installs and have never had a situation (yet) that I could not recover from.
With respect John :) you know what you are doing. I have done a number of dual boot installs and never had a really serious problem either, although when I installed Mandrake 9.1 on a Windows 2000 box, Windows 2000 now takes ages to come up (the GUI takes the same time to appear, but from then on it takes ages).