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View Full Version : What does Net framework 1.1 actually do?



Spacemannz
07-09-2004, 03:44 PM
Hey folks.

I've seen this around, and I see a few programs need it to run properly.

What exactly is the point of getting / using it?? What does it do??

Has anyone downloaded this, and used it? What uses it? Anything in XP?

I know its about 20 or so mb, and I saw it on Windowsupdate before I updated to SP2. But couldnt be bothered getting it on 56k.

Terry Porritt
07-09-2004, 04:26 PM
Well, hmm,..... it's like this:-

Just read this gobbledy-gook hype from the Microsoft Corporation :)


Introduction
The Microsoft® Windows® .NET Framework is an integral Windows component for building and running the next generation of applications and XML Web services. It provides a highly productive, standards-based, enterprise-ready, multilanguage environment that simplifies application development, enables developers to leverage their existing skill set, facilitates integration with existing software, and eases the challenges of deploying and operating Internet-scale applications. The Framework consists of two main parts: the common language runtime and a unified, hierarchical class library that includes a revolutionary advance to Active Server Pages (ASP.NET), an environment for building smart client applications (Windows Forms), and a loosely-coupled data access subsystem (ADO.NET).

This extract is from here (http://www.gotdotnet.com/team/vjsharp/introFramework.htm#_Toc31173661)

I had to download it in order to run Cookie Crusher.

Terry Porritt
07-09-2004, 04:28 PM
I like the way Americans are always leveraging things :) :) Pronounced levver.

Spacemannz
07-09-2004, 04:31 PM
Cheers Terry. I'll check that site out

robsonde
07-09-2004, 04:32 PM
> Introduction
> The Microsoft® Windows® .NET Framework is an integral
> Windows component for building and running the next
> generation of applications and XML Web services. It
> provides a highly productive, standards-based,
> enterprise-ready, multilanguage environment that
> simplifies application development, enables
> developers to leverage their existing skill set,
> facilitates integration with existing software, and
> eases the challenges of deploying and operating
> Internet-scale applications. The Framework consists
> of two main parts: the common language runtime and a
> unified, hierarchical class library that includes a
> revolutionary advance to Active Server Pages
> (ASP.NET), an environment for building smart client
> applications (Windows Forms), and a loosely-coupled
> data access subsystem (ADO.NET).
>


in very basic words........

its the MS answer to java , it lets you run small programs writen in the .net system.

Spacemannz
07-09-2004, 04:43 PM
lol I wouldnt have a clue wth that is. So, really its some more useless bloated software. Just to fill a hard drive.

robsonde
07-09-2004, 04:51 PM
bloated? yes
useless? yes to most users

do you need it??

if you need it that you will know :-)

a program that needs .net will tell you "this program needs the .net system so go to MS and get it"

if a program ask for .net then there is no way to use it with out .net being downloaded.

Spacemannz
07-09-2004, 04:57 PM
Well one program I tried had it in a ini file/setup file. Some kinda tv tuner program, that lets u schedule programs listen to music. Kind of like a multimedia centre . You would at least think it'd let u INSTALL the thing before it asks you to install Net framework. This exe file wants Net installed, before u actually install this program! It wont install without it.

Oh well.

D. McG
07-09-2004, 05:42 PM
The idea behind it is quite reasonable - it is a common library of classes etc. for programs written in a variety of languages - VB, C# or even 'managed extensions for C++'. Basically you do not need to learn a whole new library of classes to program in C# if you previously used Visual Basic, for example. Otherwise it's like the Java classes. I think .NET's CLR can run on as little as Windows ME, but it would have to be installed as a separate component; whereas XP would include some version of .NET by default.

And yes, there is some open-source project underway to bring .NET functionality to Linux without using Microsoft code. All they need to do is implement the CLR and build all the libraries with the same class names. I guess the tricky part is something like ADO.NET, which is usually used with SQL Server (a Microsoft product). I'm not sure if other DBMS' like PostGreSQL are supported.

Where the hard-drive bloat comes from is all the legacy code (pre- .NET) as well, rather than a translation layer that simply maps to one common code base. (Hope I'm not giving Microsoft any ideas here - I'd might as well patent this independently!)

Graham L
07-09-2004, 05:44 PM
It has obviously got a buzzword generator. THat's probably the bit that works. :D