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dirtbag
22-08-2004, 04:57 PM
Im confused about the difference between socket 478 and 775 Pentium 4 chips, which is the faster? which is reccomended, as im am looking at upgrading

andrew93
22-08-2004, 05:06 PM
Hi dirtbag and welcome to Press F1 - this (http://www.intel.com/design/Pentium4/documentation.htm) might help.

Spacemannz
22-08-2004, 05:10 PM
Theyre both P4. But Pin 775 / socket are more recent than 478 pin. And support PCI Xpress.

Pin 478 pin CPU /socket dont support PCI Xpress

Mike
22-08-2004, 05:29 PM
I would assume that the 775s are better, but I couldn't say if one was faster than the other, although I doubt it. The 775s are the newer model, so if you got one you'd have to get a motherboard to go with it. But if you do, it'll mean that you could upgrade easier later to a newer chip (when the 478s are no longer available).

A 775 P4 will not fit in a 478 motherboard, and a 478 P4 won't fit in a 775 motherboard.

Mike.

ahd8888
31-08-2004, 02:46 PM
To be honest, after reading an article (Maximum PC, July 2004) I am not sure what is the point of upgrading to Socket 775 mobo. The article said "Intel's next-generation LGA775 socket was originally scheduled to be the home of the now defunct Tejas CPU. If you purchase one of these mobos, Tejas' cancellation may mean that your upgrading option are limited." Pentium 4 was expected to reach 10GHz, and now it is only up to 3.6 GHz (3.4GHz on 478 mobo). To go up any further, I don't know (no one knows), but now they are in favor of "Dual-Core Design" CPU, completely change over. Anyone agree?

Sb0h
31-08-2004, 03:10 PM
I do not believe the socket 775 Prescott cpu's offer much of a gain in performance over the Northwood core at this stage. In some applications the Northwood still performs better than the Prescott of the same clock speed. Maybe when the clock speed of the new cores reaches somewhere around 4GHz there would be a reasonable performance gain to warrant the cost of upgrading to a completely new system.

Pete O\'Neil
31-08-2004, 03:16 PM
Socket 775 offers no real benefit over socket 478, socket 775 chips are cheaper for Intel to produce as the pins have now been replaced with small pads. This should in theory see the price of P4's drop. But this will be counter balanced by the increase in price of motherboards as the socket is now more difficult to produce. These new socket also have a lifespan of around 20 uses, more than enough for the average home user. But for hardware review sites and techys this can mean a new motherboard is eventually needed.

Socket 775 is just one of Intel money making ventures, unlike AMD who changed sockets to offer better preformance.

>Intel's next-generation LGA775 socket was originally scheduled to be >the home of the now defunct Tejas CPU
I dont think that was the case, LGA775 was initially scheduled to be released with Prescott, but Prescott was rushed to the market early as Intel hadnt expect the new Athlon64's to be so successful.

>Tejas' cancellation may mean that your upgrading option are limited
I also doubt this will be the case, once Intel get their A into G you should find that Prescott is more than capable of scaling well past 4GHz. Intel is just experiencing teething problems with its new production process. Dual cores are the way of the future but there more than a year away. If Intel didnt release a new CPU between now and when we see dual cores it would be bussiness suicide. Its a safe bet that we'll see CPU's using LGA775 for a long time to come. Theres also nothing to say that the new dual core cpu wont use LGA775.

>Pin 478 pin CPU /socket dont support PCI Xpress
Thats technically incorrect. It is possiable for a socket 478 motherboard to use PCIe as this is dependant on the chipset used not the socket. Although highly unlikely it is possible. Intel recently introduced their new 9XX series of chipsets all of which have support for PCIe, it just happened to coincide with the lauch of socket 775. Soltek recently released a skt 775 motherboard using the older 875 chipset.

dirtbag
04-09-2004, 01:16 PM
Another question about pentium 4 chips, which series would be reccomended? The prescott or northwood? I noticed the prescott has the larger L2 cache, Im looking at 2.8Ghz or 3Ghz chips.

Spacemannz
04-09-2004, 04:39 PM
Prescott maybe a bit faster than Northwood. BUT also heat up faster than Northwood.

Sb0h
04-09-2004, 06:17 PM
If you are looking at a 2.8 or 3GHz chip then the Prescott offers no performance gain, just a higher running temp. Yes it has more cache but this is put in to make up for the "optimisations" which Intel have put into the pipeline on the cpu. If you want a Prescott core wait for a higher clockspeed, then you'll see a performance gain. At the speeds you're talking don't touch a Prescott it is a lot hotter and no faster.

drb1
04-09-2004, 06:54 PM
There is a lot of good information posted here on a confusing(almost badge engineering) issue

Cutting out all the Technicall terms some of witch i donít quite understand.

This is not the time to be upgrading p4. That is the educated layman opinion also.

There is a lot of material that says late 2005 will see an end to the last decade + past of CPU speed doubling every 18 months.

This also ties in with Intelís 64-bit graphics board chip deal with Microsoft that i do not totally understand the techs of. We do know that all current graphics cards will not work with this gear and windows are talking of a low graphics version for the "Commercial Market".

Unless youíve lots of money, like dual layer DVD burners this is wait and see time.

metla
04-09-2004, 10:32 PM
>>This also ties in with Intelís 64-bit graphics board chip deal with Microsoft that i do not totally understand the techs of. We do know that all current graphics cards will not work with this gear and windows are talking of a low graphics version for the "Commercial Market"

That stament has me confused,can i query what your referring to?

Intels 64-bit graphics card produced in conjuction with MS?current graphics cards will not work with this gear?low graphics version for the commercial market?

64-bit cpu's are already on the market thanks to AMD,they are well ahead of Intel in this matter,but that has nothing to do with graphics cards,and all current graphics cards work with 64-bit cpu's.

Yout other referance to a "low graphics version" i presume is a confused take in Windows long delayed Longhorn OS,the new gui uses DX9 effects which obviously requires a DX9 card installed,without one it will default to the w2k gui.....But these won't be 2 seperate products,have nothing to do with 64 bit anything and are completly unrelated to Intel....

drb1
04-09-2004, 11:36 PM
My under standing

The new generation 64bit intell chips (CPU) and chipsets (Mother board), and the "Motherboards" using them, are to be enhanced for graphic applications.

These units will not run current Graphic cards/"Display adapters"(Except the ones mentioned by you and you would know).

This is the chip board combination that intell are "Talking" about releasing with an encoded serial number so that, Oem longhorn, The CPU, and Board can be traced on the internet for all time.Yes

Amd 64 bit (Beautiful things) are not entangeled in this issue. for all intents they have/will remain normal.

I did not intend to refer to any graphic card or graphic card chipset. if it reads that way it is not meant to.

metla
04-09-2004, 11:58 PM
That makes more sence and gives me a couple things i intend to follow up on.

drb1
05-09-2004, 12:10 AM
> That makes more sence and gives me a couple things i
> intend to follow up on.

Thank you,

If I confused you, what did I do to those who understand less of this complex area.