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metla
27-07-2004, 11:07 AM
Alrighty,i have a person in need of a little help,they have a mentally unbalanced stalker who rings the phone contantly,then hangs up after the second ring,Happens day and night and has been going on for years,police have been involved numerous times as have telecom,and they are back to square one.

The person getting harrased is in the medical profession so they can't change there number and have to answer every call no matter what time it rings.

So,what they want to do is mute the first 2 rings,any ideas on how to do so?

PaulD
27-07-2004, 11:29 AM
Some fancy phones with caller-id can assign different tones to groups of numbers. That might do it if the stalker always uses the same phones to call from.

KatiMike
27-07-2004, 11:37 AM
how many rings does it take for caller display to ... display ?? Seems to take my phone 5-6 to show the callers no , then it's "private number" or "line error " 50+% of the time anyway. And how many rings until Telecon can track the callers location down so a few concerned citizens can pay him/ her / it a visit and disable their ability to use a phone ever again ... ?:|

metla
27-07-2004, 11:48 AM
2

Tobas
27-07-2004, 12:06 PM
Telecom and any other telco have traceability from the moment the connection is made, even before a phone rings.

It seems strange that this has "gone on constantly for years, day in and day out", something does not ring (pun intended) quite right.

Even if the person making the calls used public phones etc, then over the years a pattern would have emerged, which would have enabled him/her to be caught long ago.

Still we have only one side of the story and we are not likely to get the side are we. But hope you solve the case metla.

Curly
27-07-2004, 12:14 PM
I wonder what muting the first two rings could achieve. So the first two rings are muted, nevertheless the caller is still going to hear two rings, except they will really be ring 3 and ring 4. So what, how does that enable him to be caught?

God I would really love to know the logic behind this one :-)

godfather
27-07-2004, 12:24 PM
I understand the request, because any "muted" rings are only "muted" at the receiver end, the caller hears all of them.

However there are no phones available that I know of that suppress the rings in that manner, nor is there a Telecom option.

Police can trace such calls, and will do so provided a complaint is lodged.

If the caller does not defeat it, caller ID should show the source as well. The caller ID info is contained in the space between the first and second ring cadence in NZ as far as I know.

tweak\'e
27-07-2004, 12:34 PM
heres a thought....

try a fax machine (one that has a phone built into it) with faxability turned on. the fax won't ring on the first 2 rings tho all the other phones in the house will.

Billy T
27-07-2004, 01:02 PM
It would be very easy to build a simple timing device that would only connect the ringer after 3-4 rings (with variable delay if required) and this would solve the end problem provided only one phone is attached to the line. It gets a bit more complicated with multiple phones, but it is still entirely practicable.

It won't help if the caller is waiting for the victim to answer before hanging up though.

A permanent solution lies in the Police and Telecom doing their joib properly and cooperating to apprehend the offender. Sounds a little like the caller's identity is already known though, and there may be practical reasons why legal or other preventative action is not appropriate.

If the latter applies then the timer is a cheap and simple solution. In what region does the good doctor reside? Relief could be near.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

metla
27-07-2004, 01:03 PM
> I wonder what muting the first two rings could
> achieve. So the first two rings are muted,
> nevertheless the caller is still going to hear two
> rings, except they will really be ring 3 and ring 4.
> So what, how does that enable him to be caught?
>
> God I would really love to know the logic behind this
> one :-)



The caller hangs up after the first 2 rings,the person getting called would live in peace if they didn't hear the first 2 rings.

Let me know if i haven't made it simplistic enough for your comprehension.

PaulD
27-07-2004, 01:16 PM
You can get stand alone faxability switches like the Teltest Smart Ring Decoder that can be reprogrammed to switch on the normal cadence. That would delay normal ringing slightly.

Nuisance callers are often clever enough not to use their own phone or use public phones. The Police don't seem keen to get bogged down with something that may be difficult to prove in Court

johnboy
27-07-2004, 01:40 PM
Is this helpful here (http://www.dcrawford.com/homeseer/HS_PhoneSwitch.html)

Billy T
27-07-2004, 04:15 PM
That's a lot of dollars johnboy, for a device that can be built for about $10-$20 tops. Plus there is the potential hitch that muting just two rings might not be quite enough.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Graham L
27-07-2004, 05:45 PM
There is a "very minor" legal problem with this solution. :D Type approval. :-( I know a lot of equipment is connected to the lines without being approved, but it is still illegal.

I suspect that any mains powered device would be seriously frowned on.

metla
27-07-2004, 05:48 PM
I had a telstra tech out to fix my lines once,when he saw my...uh....modifications he went bananas,told me it was a ten grand fine to mess with the gear,i ejected him by the scruff of the neck and rang telstra and told them what i thought about it,i recieved a letter of apology and a better behaved service man to sort out the problem.

Billy T
27-07-2004, 05:54 PM
> I suspect that any mains powered device would be
> seriously frowned on.

Line power would probably be enough for my idea Graham, or a small battery at most. It would only need to be active during the hours of Nod too, so the solution needn't be very complex.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Graham L
27-07-2004, 06:26 PM
The reasons for the Telepermit are given in PTC100. The "Customer's Responsibilities" sections of PTC 103 are quite clear. Basically, any CPE (customer provided equipment) "shall" have a Telepermit. Anything connected to the Telecom network "shall" have a Telepermit or be provided by Telecom.

PTC information (http://www.telepermit.co.nz/) is here.

I suspect that Telstra will have similar requirements for their customers. I bet that anything they connect directly to Telecoms network has a green sticker. :D They can't afford to be disconnected from the Telecom network.

I'm sure your design wouldn't send a lethal charge back to explode the phone used by the malefactor and buildings for 100 metres around. But Telecom don't know that someone wouldn't. They are concerned about the safety of their equipment, and perhaps their staff. ;-)

andrew93
27-07-2004, 06:36 PM
> I'm sure your design wouldn't send a lethal charge
> back to explode the phone used by the malefactor

Now there's a suggestion...

Billy T
27-07-2004, 09:19 PM
> I'm sure your design wouldn't send a lethal charge
> back to explode the phone used by the malefactor and
> buildings for 100 metres around. But Telecom don't
> know that someone wouldn't. They are concerned about
> the safety of their equipment, and perhaps their
> staff. ;-)

I take your point Graham, and in an ideal world nobody would even consider doing this, but having endured nuisance calls myself and had Telecom expect me to tell them everything about every call including the name, address, telephone number, hair colour and shoe size of the offender(s), I gave up and went to work with a relay, a battery and a slack handful of electronic parts to dump the ringer at times when no decent human would be calling me. It was a simpler arrangement than the present situation requires though.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

AnneLear
27-07-2004, 09:41 PM
Could the victim try getting dual number (second number unlisted) and an answerphone service?
Presumably this is his/her home number.
If there is a separate surgery number for business hours, then the second number could be used for incoming calls to home during the day, with the number given out privately only. The 'main' number could be on permanent answerphone during the day, and at night when the doctor is not on call.
When the doctor is on call and presumably taking calls at home, then an answering service could be used to take and forward all genuine incoming calls, either to the 'private' home number or to a cellphone.
If they use the same number for home and business then it's time to get a separate business number, I think.

Big John
27-07-2004, 10:15 PM
> Alrighty,i have a person in need of a little
> help,they have a mentally unbalanced stalker who
> rings the phone contantly,then hangs up after the
> second ring,Happens day and night and has been going
> on for years,police have been involved numerous times
> as have telecom,and they are back to square one.

How sure are they it is a stalker?

We had a problem with our phone in that it would ring once or twice and then stop. Pick it up and no one was there.

Turns out it was a fault with the jack point. It had liquid in it and also some ants had mad a small home in there. People ringing would get 1 or 2 rings and then it would hang up on them.

It took 2 weeks to work this out and Telecom sent out a guy to fix it in the end.

PaulD
27-07-2004, 10:39 PM
"It took 2 weeks to work this out and Telecom sent out a guy to fix it in the end."

It shouldn't have taken Telecom that long if they were involved. Very, very common type of fault. The change to 2 wire jacks incorporated many small changes to reduce the chances of this happening. Phones can also go low insulation around the ringer cct and cause this to happen.