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bk T
25-07-2004, 01:20 AM
I deleted all the partitions (2) of an old celeron 400 machine and when loading the OS (XP Home), it detected only 12 GB of HDD space; but it is a 20 GB HDD! where has the other 8 GB gone to? BIOS is set to autodetect.

Any idea why?

drcspy
25-07-2004, 07:03 AM
perhaps it has a 13Gb drive bios limit and it was previously running DDO software, (dynamic drive overlay), to 'fool' the bios etc and now since you deleted the partitions that software has gone west lol.............goto the hdd manufacturers site and download whatever software they offer in that line ?

drcspy
25-07-2004, 07:04 AM
either that or havig deleted the partitions you didn't recreate them quite right

bk T
25-07-2004, 11:12 AM
> either that or havig deleted the partitions you
> didn't recreate them quite right

Well, it's when I was setting up Windows and during the process, I deleted all those partitions (looks as if I really physically deleted the 8 GB of Hdd space!) but after that Windows setup did not detect the the actual size of the HDD.

I ran fdisk (boot from A: using Win98 boot disk) but it didn't help.

Graham L
25-07-2004, 04:51 PM
Use the W98 to renove all partitions, and see if the XP one makes a better job of it. :D

Davesdad
25-07-2004, 05:50 PM
Right click My Computer, select Manage to open Computer Management. In the left pane select Disk management to display the status of your disk drives. You will be able to see the partition and format info for your disk. The missing 8gig may just be unallocated space

bk T
25-07-2004, 05:55 PM
> Use the W98 to renove all partitions,

That's what I did - used Win98's fdisk to remove the partitions but still can't find the lost disk space ?:|

Performing a low level format will help??

drcspy
25-07-2004, 06:19 PM
did you note what I said ?
have you also used fdisk to check the partitions and try to use all the hdd space?

bk T
25-07-2004, 08:36 PM
> Right click My Computer, select Manage to open
> Computer Management. In the left pane select Disk
> management to display the status of your disk drives.
> You will be able to see the partition and format info
> for your disk. The missing 8gig may just be
> unallocated space

No. Have checked and the 8 gb isn't there.

bk T
25-07-2004, 08:38 PM
>...
> have you also used fdisk to check the partitions and
> try to use all the hdd space?


Done all that!

Maybe it's time to get a new HDD?

agent_24
25-07-2004, 10:00 PM
did you say there were two partitions to start with?

bk T
25-07-2004, 11:08 PM
> did you say there were two partitions to start with?

Yes. Originally, there were two partitions. During the Windows setup process, I deleted both the partitions but after that Windows couldn't see the 8 gig.

Growly
25-07-2004, 11:22 PM
What filesystem did you format it with ?

Is there another computer you can try it in?

agent_24
25-07-2004, 11:30 PM
i would suspect two partions, becuase of bios limits as mentioned earlier, so maybe just re-partition and do it in two 10gig sections.

I once had an old 2 gig drive that was going mad with its partions - tried a program called ranish partion manager and it sorted it out fine.

its a rather old program it seems, but it might work

Growly
25-07-2004, 11:35 PM
Did you ever do a full format?

agent_24
25-07-2004, 11:36 PM
good point

bk T
26-07-2004, 01:26 PM
> Did you ever do a full format?

The system doesn't detect (see) the full capacity of the HDD, does it really matter whether it's a full format or quick format? The system must be able to detect the actual capacity at the first place, right?

Cheers

Graham L
26-07-2004, 04:22 PM
This old myth of low-level formatting has come up again. :_|

Modern drives are low-level formatted in the factory. That's it. The tracks are laid down on a servo platter, which doesn't store data: it just steers the head assembly. This is done with the drive open, and the heads are moved by a precision positioner.The surfaces are formatted, then checked thoroughly, and a table saved in an EEPROM which is used to bypass any bad sectors and tracks, using spare sectors and tracks.

A "low-level format" utility, usually provided to make traditionalists happy, might actually do nothing. At most it will rewrite the sector ID bytes and check the surface. Any bad sectors found in a "user" format are just marked as bad in OS tables. And it's usually an OS function, which can't be performed except on a partition known to the OS. You can't format a drive to make more space available to be partitioned unless it has been partitioned. ;-)

Most MFM drives needed low-level formatting when new, and occasionally during their life. This was because the track position was determined by the steps of a stepper motor, and gravity. If a drive was formatted in the horizontal position then mounted vertically, it was likely to be very unreliable because of the weight of the heads displaced them partly or completely off the tracks. So the formatting was done in the position intended. This was included as part of the IBM XT and AT BIOS code, and clones. It was often started from DEBUG, though I have had one BIOS which had it accessed from the screen setup menus. (I suspect that was a "dummy" formatting routine, though it did rewrite the headers, since it was in 1991 and IDE were standard by then).

kiwibeat
27-07-2004, 09:19 AM
Use Partition magic that will detect it