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Steve_L
18-07-2004, 12:30 AM
Today I converted a cassette tape that my wife recorded (of a music workshop that she gave) to .wav files on my PC, using Cool Edit Pro. I have not used Cool Edit for a couple of years and cannot get the conversion to .wma working. I am assuming that .wav files will not play on ordinary CD players (stereos), right? The .wav file must be converted to .wma files, correct?

Cool Edit does have a converter - under File / Batch Conversion. But try as I may, an error message keeps popping up - saying that another application is using the .wav file (but this is not true).

Is there a free converter around, perhaps on a PCWorld cover CD?

BTW, I tried to get into the PrF1 FAQs all day but the page will not download.

Exwesty
18-07-2004, 01:10 AM
Wave files are what will play in a standard CD player.
Therefore you can burn the files as they are, bear in mind some older CD players may have problems recognising a burnt CD, however this can be overcome by using disks with a silver data layer.
Some newer CD players will accept both CDR and CD - RW disks, also some will also accept files as .MP3 or WMA, however check the hardware specification 1st.

Steve_L
18-07-2004, 09:57 AM
Thanks Exwesty. This is just what I need this Sunday morning: an nice easy answer! For some reason I thought that .wav files needed to be converted for ordinary use.

>>>using disks with a silver data layer.

Really? Never heard of this. I did know about older CD players/stereos not playing CDR/RW (my car CD player likes CDR but not CDRW) but not that a special type of disk / silver layer would make it OK. Where do we get these disks / what brand / cost?

Steve_L
18-07-2004, 12:58 PM
What threw me was to see .cda files on a commercial music CD, and to have .wav files on the HD. Are these two types of files equivalent in a way that allows most all stereos/CD players to read them?

Billy T
18-07-2004, 01:10 PM
> >using disks with a silver data layer.
>
> Really? Never heard of this. I did know about older
> CD players/stereos not playing CDR/RW (my car CD
> player likes CDR but not CDRW) but not that a special
> type of disk / silver layer would make it OK. Where
> do we get these disks / what brand / cost?


The problem is the refelctivity of the different dye colours used e.g. green. gold, blue etc. Have a look at this site (http://www.cdmediaworld.com/hardware/cdrom/cd_quality.shtml) Steve, it will tell you the colours for different brands of CD-R. Go to the bottom of the first page for the link to dye colour information.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Steve_L
18-07-2004, 02:05 PM
Thanks Billy. A very interesting site!

Going to a linked page
I find this info:

>>The gold-colored CD-R uses the PhthaloCyanine pigment and a gold reflection layer. As the pigment is transparent, the golden reflection layer shines through the bottom side giving the `golden' look. Compared to the other colored media, the reflection contrast of the golden medium is the highest and the durability of such CD-R's is said to be over 100 years. As the golden medium's reflective property is the highest, if your friends or customers have problems reading data from any other burnt media, try using the gold medium CD-R.

>>The green CD-R, the cheapest of the three, uses the Cyanine pigment. By itself, the pigment is blue in color, but together with the gold reflective layer, the bottom appears green. However, cyanine's ability to maintain reflectivity is poor giving it a life span of about 10 years. It also delivers the weakest reflection contrasts and thus can cause read errors when run on old CD-ROM drives. Lately cyanine formula has been altered which results in a much higher life span (20 to 50 years). The gold reflection layer has also been replaced by a silver reflection layer this make the color of the bottom appear blue.

Well, I have waded through the info but I am not too sure if I have it right.......by saying that here in NZ, a good bet for good quality CDs are TDKs, probably also Kodak (but have not seen any good prices on Kodak CDs). It is not clear to me which CDs in NZ have a SILVER reflective layer and if (as was stated above) that Silver will play CD-RW better in older CD players. ?:|

Cheers, Steve

Steve_L
18-07-2004, 02:07 PM
The URL for the dye colour info given above is

http://www.cdmediaworld.com/hardware/cdrom/cd_dye.shtml

Exwesty
07-08-2004, 10:03 AM
I have what used to be a top line Sony DVD player that despite the manual saying it won't support CDR or CDRW, i managed to get it to read some music disks that I compilied.
These were NEC 650Mb disks and I only ever found one packet of them, no other disks I have bought since, eg Transonic, TDK, Verbatim etc have ever worked.
The only difference is that the NEC disks were silver, my only mistake was that i used most for data backups before I discovered that my player would accept them.

Of course now you can buy a DVD player for about a 1/10 of the cost and it will support MP3 & Jpg etc and read off just about any brand.

Exwesty
07-08-2004, 10:06 AM
I have what used to be a top line Sony DVD player that despite the manual saying it won't support CDR or CDRW, i managed to get it to read some music disks that I compilied.
These were NEC 650Mb disks and I only ever found one packet of them, no other disks I have bought since, eg Transonic, TDK, Verbatim etc have ever worked.
The only difference is that the NEC disks were silver, my only mistake was that i used most for data backups before I discovered that my player would accept them.

Of course now you can buy a DVD player for about a 1/10 of the cost and it will support MP3 & Jpg etc and read off just about any brand.