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Ashley Matthews
04-07-2004, 11:55 PM
Hey,

I just took the plunge and installed Xandros 2.0 Deluxe.

One thing I have noticed is that it cannot write to NTFS partitions.
Is this a licensing issue or something else?
If not, how can I get Xandros to be able to write to my Windows drives.

Also, a second problem, but one I can live with. I'd like to get my 3Com 802.11g WLAN card to work. It's model number 3CRWE154G72. I've looked on google but to no avail, does anyone have any ideas on how to get it to work... I'm stumped. Perhaps a newer kernel?

Thanks
Ashley

whiskeytangofoxtrot
05-07-2004, 12:09 AM
It's because Linux NTFS support is extremely flaky - mostly due to the fact that the "standard" for NTFS changes a lot hence supporting them all is difficult.

You'd be a brave fellow to try it.

Chilling_Silence
05-07-2004, 12:09 AM
I know that the Deluxe edition can Resize NTFS Partitions fine during installation (That's what it says on the website at least), however actually writing to the File-System when you're in Linux is another matter altogether.

Try looking up the captive-ntfs project, its probably your best bet.

Either that, or compile your own 2.6 kernel (Im not sure if Xandros Deluxe ships one on the 2nd Disc?), as the 2.6 kernel includes basic write-support for NTFS drives :-)

Hope this helps


Chill.

Chilling_Silence
05-07-2004, 12:11 AM
> It's because Linux NTFS support is extremely flaky -
> mostly due to the fact that the "standard" for NTFS
> changes a lot hence supporting them all is
> difficult.
Good point

> You'd be a brave fellow to try it.
Not entirely true.
Do a quick search for Captive-NTFS, and you'll see that because it uses a couple of Windows DLL and exe files that its pretty much perfect :-)

Graham L
05-07-2004, 03:45 PM
There is no problem writing to any FAT style partition. The fact that distributions don't include writing to NTFS means that they aren't happy with the safety. MS don't want to be portable. ;-) The FAT structures were a straight copy of C/PM and trivially easy to handle. (I once wrote MSDOS disks on a PDP11 ... a simple programme under RT11. ;-))

The safest way is to have a "vfat" partition which both systems can use. Any direct writing to NTFS should be accompanied with good backups. :D

kiki
05-07-2004, 08:20 PM
Why haven't those NTFS developers for linux made use of that Windows 2000 source code leak from a while back?

Dolby Digital
05-07-2004, 08:34 PM
>>I once wrote MSDOS disks on a PDP11
PDP11 - a classic machine by all accounts.

Chilling_Silence
06-07-2004, 03:20 AM
If they did even _look_ at that code, there'd be Microsoft Lawsuits to 'nam!

kiki
06-07-2004, 01:11 PM
Question is, how would Microsoft ever find out?

Chilling_Silence
06-07-2004, 01:19 PM
Code similarities etc...
AFAIK there's even issues with reading the debug assembly code and then going to program another app of your own.....

Could be wrong thou....

kiki
06-07-2004, 03:18 PM
> Code similarities etc...

Well if they copied it word for word, yeah - but I don't think they would be that stupid. They are better off looking at it to see how it works and improving on it or something.