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View Full Version : What cable to buy for connecting my notebook...



Mcpisik
27-06-2004, 08:48 AM
Hi,
Can someone tell me the name of the cable I need to buy to do the following?....
I have my home pc connected to a dynalink rta300.
I would like to connect my toshiba notebook to the back of the router as well. (I have it working if I want to use only one at a time)
Just don't know what cable to order ( I want about 5metres)
I think it might be a rj45 that I need but am unsure. And I don't know what the catergory 5, 6 etc is.
Both pcs run xp. and have 10/100 lan if that means something...
Many thanks!
Kris

Megaman
27-06-2004, 09:44 AM
my Cat.6 cable was used to connect my XP and Linux computers, so you'll need a Cat 5 cable to cojnnect to a switch

Curious George
27-06-2004, 09:52 AM
It's called cat5 cable, with two rj45 ends. Be sure to get a straight through cable, not a crossover.
It's easiest to go to DSE or similar and buy the pre made length, instead of making your own.
I think it works out to about $1 to $1.50 per meter.
Cat 6 cable will also work, but you wont notice any difference unless you have a giganet connection

Megaman
27-06-2004, 09:57 AM
> Cat 6 cable will also work, but you wont notice any
> difference unless you have a giganet connection

I thought it only worked for direct computer-computer connections, not for computer-switch-computer ones?

Billy T
27-06-2004, 10:58 AM
The only real difference between Cat 5 and Cat 6 is the ability to carry significantly higher speed data on Cat 6. They are otherwise fully interchangeable.

Cat 5E (E = enhanced) is slightly better than Cat 5.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Mcpisik
27-06-2004, 01:52 PM
Great. Many thanks for your input guys!
Cheers for helping :-)

Fire-and-Ice
27-06-2004, 03:32 PM
> It's called cat5 cable, with two rj45 ends. Be sure
> to get a straight through cable, not a crossover.

Funny, all my computers work fine with crossover cables on the same model router. ;-)

Mcpisik
27-06-2004, 04:07 PM
so what is a crossover cable? :-)

Graham L
27-06-2004, 04:12 PM
megaman: the difference is in the pin connections, not in the cable type.

There are two sorts of connection used for this" twisted pair" Ethernet: "straight", and "crossover". The straight is the normal one: used between devices (such as computers) and hubs, switches or routers. Crossover cables are used only to connect two computers without a hub (etc). Most commercial crossovers have red covers on the plugs as a warning. :D

Cat5 and Cat6 are different standards for the physical cable. Cat 6 is rated for higher frequency use than Cat 5. Either is fine for 100 MHz, but most sold retail will be Cat 6.

Connecting a computer to a router requires a"straight" cable (which will have RJ45 connectors).

Fire-and-Ice
27-06-2004, 04:28 PM
> Connecting a computer to a router requires
> a"straight" cable (which will have RJ45 connectors).

Would damage be done using crossover cable to connect to a router or is it supposed to just not work? ?:|

Mcpisik
27-06-2004, 04:37 PM
Thanks. If you were buying it would you just get category 6 and be done with it? Or is it really just of no benefit compared to the 5 in my situation?

Graham L
27-06-2004, 04:43 PM
It won't work. :D

There are two pairs used. One is "transmit", the other is receive". The T end at one device has to go to R on the other and vice versa.

Because the Ethernet designers live in the real world, there is enough protection in tranceivers to stand a lot of abuse. (There's even a spark gap ;-)). But connecting T-T and R-R just doesn't work. (Except for some clever gear which autodetects and can cope).

The ports on a switch, hub, or router are wired one way, the ports on computers are the other so that all the connections in a network can be straight through. This helps to reduce the confusion. One port on a R/H/S might be marked "X", or have a slide switch beside it. This is for expansion (so a straight cable can be used from this to connect to another S/H/R). Plugging a computer into an X port won't work either. ;-)

Graham L
27-06-2004, 04:45 PM
At 5 metres it won't matter. If you were using the full 100 metres, I'd go for Cat6.

tweak\'e
27-06-2004, 05:01 PM
>Funny, all my computers work fine with crossover cables on the same model router

some network cards can autodetect crossover cables and use them as normal cables (afaik).

Mcpisik
27-06-2004, 05:01 PM
Beauty thanks!

Mcpisik
27-06-2004, 05:18 PM
So this one below will be ok then?...
(Is there any difference between manufacturers? (Seemed to be a heck of a lot of them))

Cat5e PATCH CABLE BLUE 5m (DD000869)
Our Price: $10.82 +
HIGH QUALITY NETWORK CABLE
PI DATE : Feb 2004
TYPE : CAT 5E Patch Cable
CORD LENGTH: 4.57 meters
CONNECTOR A: RJ45(Cat 5E Straight Through)
CONNECTOR B: RJ45(Cat 5E Straight Through)
COATING : PVC, Blue
DIMENSIONS : 139.7 x 139.7 x 25.4 mm (HxWxD)
WEIGHT : 0.16kg
* Enhanced CAT 5e UTP patch cable
* EIA/TIA Approved
* Snagless boots, 350 MHz, 568B
* Keeps the network up & running

Murray P
27-06-2004, 05:42 PM
That'll be fine.

Just out of interest check the ports on your router or the manual for such words as auto sensing o (up)link (which are usually auto sensing AFAIK). I think more often than not a modem/router with a hub will just have one uplink port for connecting other devices to like switches, wireless, etc.

Cheers Murray P