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jerry_23
17-04-2004, 01:20 AM
I am trying to install redhat 9 as a dual boot with my existing windows XP OS.

I have read various documentation on how to do this and its all confusing (geek speak)!

I have tried using Partition Magic 8 and it stuffed everything up, so I'm not using that again.

Can anyone suggest a site or instructions that the majority of people like myself could follow so that we may even have a hope of escaping Microsoft Windows.

beama
17-04-2004, 01:52 AM
jerry
try your local library The dummies ( not trying to be nasty) series of books are good starting point
try the red hat site
try your local linux user group here (http://www.linux.net.nz/)

Jen C
17-04-2004, 01:01 PM
>I have tried using Partition Magic 8 and it stuffed everything up, so I'm not using that again.

When you used PM to create some free space, did you leave the new partition as unallocated (free space)? That is, don't try to use PM to format that partition with ext2/ext3 (Linux file systems). The Red Hat installation process will format the unallocated space automatically if you choose Automatic Partitioning and "keep all partitions and use existing free space".

For your information, Linux refers to hard drives as hda, hdb etc. hda is hard drive 'a', so if you only have one physical hard drive installed it will be hda. A second hard drive (eg Slave) will be referred to as hdb. Linux then refers to the partitions within a hard drive with numbers. hda1 is the first partition on the drive, hda2 the second and so on.

There is a graphical installation guide for Red Hat 8 (hardly any difference to what you will see with RH9) that you might like to look at here (http://www.blackviper.com/Articles/OS/InstallRH80/installrh8-1.htm). The official RH 9 installation guide can also be viewed here (http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/install-guide/) or downloaded as a PDF from Red Hat Linux 9 - x86 Installation Guide (http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/).

A much more easier way of trying out Linux is to get another hard drive and install it as a slave, that way you don't have to worry about partitioning XP's drive and the risk of data lose involved in that.

NOTE: Red Hat will no longer provide for maintenance and errata support for the Red Hat Linux from the end of this month as Red Hat now focuses on its Red Hat Enterprise (commercial) business. The alternative now available is the Fedora Project for the free version. Fedora Core 1 is the equivalent of what Red Hat 10 would of been had it been released. Read more here (https://www.redhat.com/software/rhelorfedora/).

I would install Fedora Core 1 instead if you are interested the the Red Hat type distribution. Fedora is undergoing testing for its new release Core 2 at the moment which will be released mid May if the schedule is not delayed by the testing.

Fedora Project homepage (http://fedora.redhat.com/)

Hope all this helps.

Jen :)

beama
17-04-2004, 03:29 PM
there are many ways to install linux and the way jen just outlined is pretty straight forward (althrough that didnt work for me, jen, It would not reconise the partions as free space, I ended up using fdisk and disk druid (laptop, dual boot Xp Pro and RH9)).
I would also reccomend installing Fedora because of the simple fact that hardware support is going to better and also as jen rightly pointed out, support will soon be no longer be available for RH9.

If you what to get in behind the Linux GUI all I can say is "I havent this much fun as since I discovered DOS" If you what to understand how a operating system works use a CLI (Command Line Interface)for a while.

good luck

mark.p
17-04-2004, 04:57 PM
Spot on beama. http://jetblackz.cjb.net/ has some good info for those new to Linux. You can download the book and read it at your leasure off line. Also once you get use to the Linux way of doing things a lot of what you have learned is transferable to other *nix based enviroments.

jerry_23
18-04-2004, 10:56 PM
Thanks to all for the advice and useful links.

I started committing myself to reading one of the redhat 9 installation setups, but there was so much, and so many different terms to windows, that it was sort of like reading a book, and halfway through, I got lost completely.

Another HDD is almost definitely on the cards, but I would still like to conquer the partition thing and run both off my laptop.

One other thing that stands out from all I have read... do I need a partition for a swap file...I have 512 Ram, and have read that unless I have heaps of Ram, I would need a swap file part.

Jen C
18-04-2004, 11:04 PM
>One other thing that stands out from all I have read... do I need a partition for a swap file...I have 512 Ram, and have read that unless I have heaps of Ram, I would need a swap file part

Red Hat and Fedora's installation program, Anaconda, will automatically create a swap partition of an appropriate size according to your installed RAM if you choose automatic partitioning.

JohnD
18-04-2004, 11:40 PM
The standard as I remember it is to create a swap partition twice the size of your installed RAM.

Chilling_Silence
19-04-2004, 11:27 AM
Yes John, Ive heard the same...

Although it seems rather stupid if you have 32MB Ram creating one that's 64MB big, when something around the 200MB mark would be better spent, and if you have 512MB Ram (As I do too) having a 1GB Swap partition (Mine has been used once on my desktop, and never on my laptop).

Can anybody shed some light on why people recommend that?


Chill.