PDA

View Full Version : Don't you get sick of these Email footnotes



hay u
05-04-2004, 02:19 PM
************************************************** ***********************************************
This e-mail, including attachments, may be confidential and/or privileged. Only the intended recipient may access or use it. Any dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient please notify us immediately by return e-mail and then erase the e-mail. Any confidentiality or privilege is not waived or lost if you have received this e-mail in error.
************************************************** ***********************************************

I normally change it to read something like this
************************************************** ***********************************************
This e-mail, including attachments, may be confidential and/or privileged. Any dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail is up to you.
I know what I am doing when I selected your E-mail address, you are the intended recipient live with it. ************************************************** ***********************************************

Graham L
05-04-2004, 02:23 PM
But you're an exception. :D

That sort of thing is added by the lawyers in big businesses and givernment departments, who know that since they treat their employees with contempt (which is heartily recipriocated) errors will happen. Often. And they might be sued for disclosing information to unauthorised people.

It's known as CYA.

agent
05-04-2004, 04:21 PM
If you used a half-decent email client, you would be able to formulate some sort of filtering rule to clear out blocks of text which contained the words "confidential", "dissemination", and "attachments", among other variations on those words. Or even just delete the emails immediately, as a protest against those footnotes.

PS: I used to use a footnote like that on my emails, and I'm only a student :p

Jester
05-04-2004, 04:44 PM
It's called "covering your butt". If someone mistakingly sends you an email with material that may be sensitive to a businesses' activities and you act on it, then you breached the terms of receiving the email.

Usually there is more added that disclaims any corporate liability should you take offence at what the individual wrote in the email.

All's fair in love and court :D

Billy T
05-04-2004, 05:01 PM
Nope, don't read 'em John.

Life's too short to be irritated by reading the dross at the bottom of emails.

I don't use them either.

Cheers

Billy 8-{) :D

bmason
05-04-2004, 06:23 PM
> It's called "covering your butt". If someone
> mistakingly sends you an email with material that may
> be sensitive to a businesses' activities and you act
> on it, then you breached the terms of receiving the
> email.

If its so important you have to wonder why they are sending it in a form that allows anyone to read the message.

What I really don't like is the demands they make, whats wrong with a request to notify them of _their_ error, rather than legal treats.
I suspect they aren't actually legally binding. If they want to restrict what I do with a message then they should have asked me to agree to some conditions before they send the message.

> Usually there is more added that disclaims any
> corporate liability should you take offence at what
> the individual wrote in the email.

Something like that does seem reasonable to me, esp. since most of the messages with this boiler plate are not at all work related :-).


I'm thinking about adding the following to my .sig just incase:
************************************************** ******************************
This e-mail, including attachments, may be confidential and/or privileged.
By receiving this message you have agreed in exchange to send the original author of the above message exactly one trained circus monkey with tertiary, or equivalent qualifications (hereby referred to as Bobo) within seven days of the date on which this message was sent. If Bobo is not received within this time frame the recipient will become liable for one additional monkey with equivalent qualifications as Bobo and one fully trained acrobatic circus elephant for each day over due. Any dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail will also be bound these same terms.
************************************************** ******************************

... it might pay off.

Noel Nosivad
05-04-2004, 06:31 PM
Hey hay u,

I know these messages are annoying, but it's there to cover our butts.

I made it even more annoying by actually making the message a header, not a footnote, so the first thing they saw was this disclaimer message.

My reason for this, well obviously someone has to read the message, and then at the bottom find out that if it wasn't for them that they should have not done that, it made no sense to me why it had to appear at the bottom, so I made it appear at the top.

The thing more annoying is when other people's disclaimers are replied to your email, now you are dealing with twice the annoyance. However you are entitled to ignore it, it's only used in the events that an email has accidently gone to somewhere that it shouldn't have gone and for that recipient to do the right thing.


Noel Nosivad

Jester
05-04-2004, 06:40 PM
Life's short - I have many more things to get upset over, things that in the scheme of things are more important :D

Greg S
06-04-2004, 03:59 AM
I read somewhere some time ago that those footnotes don't mean a thing in a court dispute.

In my opinion they're just using typical f************ legalese that their profession try to use to con the public.

Any time I get a message from someone that has that type of sahit in it I'm tempted to mass-mail their address and email contents to known spam lists

;)

Chris Randal
06-04-2004, 09:15 AM
Don't forget though, that a worm may have created the email, so the company from whom the communication purports to originate may be pleased to know that you have received something NOT intended for you.

Winston001
06-04-2004, 09:38 PM
> In my opinion they're just using typical
> f************ legalese that their profession try to
> use to con the public.


Damn. Our cover is blown.

But the local Law Society knows where you live Greg. Be afraid, very afraid................


*This post is intended only for Greg and all other users of this forum reading this missive must delete it immediately and send Bobo the monkey packaged in a suitably perforated a plain brown paper wrapper to this poster in lieu of liquidated damages*

metla
06-04-2004, 09:55 PM
I get faxes daily from some medical company with details of clients drugs.

along with a whopping disclaimer about privacy,part of which states that I'm not allowed to read it if I'm not the intended receiver.

Now,I could care less about their wishes,I won't distribute the info because I'm not that sort of person(and their is no money in it)but I don't agree with their tone when they are the ones sending the stuff out to the wrong number.They need to sort their end out,not just send it out into the wilderness with a big heavy handed puff of crap attached to it.

The other thing that aggravates me is that it states that anyone who receives it wrongly "has" to contact them,Again,I could not care less what some crap arse company whom is making mistakes thinks they have the right to instruct me to do,but its wasting my ink so I want to stop it,......but their is no return fax number,instead it says Fax sent by pc.....


I intend to send them a bill for ink used,wear and tear on my fax machine,the cost of the phone calls in tracking them down,and for my time.


Then I may even send them a nasty letter,stating at the end its confidential,that they were never meant to receive it,and they do not have the right to show it to anyone.

whiskeytangofoxtrot
07-04-2004, 12:38 AM
The whole concept is pretty poor, if you're sending things that sensitive and you mess up the address then you should bear the consequences of whoever received it.

The ones demanding a phone call to a toll number to report it are pretty outlandish really.

I mean when I get my credit card posted out by the bank, theres nothing that I can remember seeing printed outside or inside the envelope that says 'Oh yeah, if this credit card isn't for you, be a sport and cut it up, then take some more time and give us a ring, that'd be great'

It's almost as annoying, but not quite so, as the idiot 'Admins' who leave their mail server virus scanners set to bounce to all and sundry that they sent a virus to x company when 9 out 0f 10 viruses fake their sender addresses.

bmason
07-04-2004, 03:37 PM
> I mean when I get my credit card posted out by the
> bank, theres nothing that I can remember seeing
> printed outside or inside the envelope that says 'Oh
> yeah, if this credit card isn't for you, be a sport
> and cut it up, then take some more time and give us a
> ring, that'd be great'

Isn't it illegal to open other peoples mail? I think postcards are a better analogy to email because they don't even have the protection of an envelope.

Graham L
07-04-2004, 04:11 PM
metla: I believe it's a legal requirement for every fax to have the fax number and name of the sender included.

Anyway, I suspect that such a CYA note wouldn't be a very good defence if someone whose confidential details were "accidentally" sent to people not entitled by carelessness took the trouble to sue the company.

metla
07-04-2004, 09:42 PM
legal requirment?

hmmm.....My fax machine only sends my number if its configured to do so,and it loses that info everytime i unplug it...