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yingxuan
25-02-2004, 10:18 AM
IF a cellphone is vodafone can it be changed to telecom?

The trademe said that the phone is vodafone phone but if u were to buy a cellphone overseas or any cellphone there's no such thing as a vodafone phone phone correct? U can choose what type of network you want to use.
Does anyone know how telecom puts u into the network?
They don't use a sim card so what exactly happens?

Fire-and-Ice
25-02-2004, 10:29 AM
> IF a cellphone is vodafone can it be changed to
> telecom?

No, absolutely not.

> The trademe said that the phone is vodafone phone but
> if u were to buy a cellphone overseas or any
> cellphone there's no such thing as a vodafone phone
> phone correct? U can choose what type of network you
> want to use.
> Does anyone know how telecom puts u into the
> network?
> They don't use a sim card so what exactly happens?

If the phone is on one of those pre-paid plans it comes with its own number which remains with it for the life of the phone. After purchase (from new) it is activated by the customer by phoning Telecom and requesting they activate it. If you buy a Telecom phone on Trademe you inherit the phone's number from the seller.

yingxuan
25-02-2004, 10:45 AM
the guy at trademe bought the phone overseas and its never been used.Its new.It says vodafone network but since its never been used can it be change to telecom.

Fire-and-Ice
25-02-2004, 10:50 AM
> It says vodafone network but since its never been used can it be change to telecom.

I doubt it. Why don't you phone Telecom and ask them? ;-)

sam m
25-02-2004, 10:52 AM
> the guy at trademe bought the phone overseas and its
> never been used.Its new.It says vodafone network but
> since its never been used can it be change to
> telecom.

Nope, now way, no how.
If it has a sim card then it can only connected to a GSM network which means here in NZ as only Vodafone.
Telecoms 027 phones use CDMA and even though this system is used overseas you can not buy a CDMA phone overseas and make it work here.

SKT174
25-02-2004, 11:05 AM
No, since both Vodafone & Telecom uses completely different Network.

You're right about there's no such thing as Vodafone phone phone, but there's a thing called GSM phone (vodafone uses GSM network) and Telecom uses CDMA network (correct me if I'm wrong about Telecom).

To make things more complicated, GSM comes under GSM850, GSM900, GSM1800 and GSM1900 as well, but GSM900 is the most common one.

Most GSM phones on the market will accept GSM900 and GSM1800, some even accepts all four.

I'm not sure how Telecom mobile works as I've only used GSM network and the Roaming and GPRS features are useful to me.

yingxuan
25-02-2004, 11:35 AM
the phone i gsm 1800 and gsm 900 as well.What gsm is telecom?

sam m
25-02-2004, 11:58 AM
> the phone i gsm 1800 and gsm 900 as well.What gsm is
> telecom?

Telecom is NOT gsm.

Basically the phones that you have been bidding on at Trademe can NOT be changed to or connected to Telecom, end of story.

yingxuan
25-02-2004, 02:40 PM
if a phone is blocked if u were to insert the sim card in.IT doesn't mean that the phone is stolen correct?

There's an auction at trademe selling for around 45 dollars and it said that the phone is block.No matter which sim card u put in it'll say sim registration failed.IT just means that the phone is..??
Not stolen is it?

Sb0h
25-02-2004, 03:22 PM
I think you are a little confused as to what GSM is. GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) is the "format" (for want of a better word) the network is based on. In this "format" there are different bandwidths that are used ie 900MHz, 1800Mhz etc hence the GSM900 and GSM1800 etc. There are many GSM carriers (or networks) around the world like Vodafone, Orange, Optus and many countries have more than one carrier to choose from. In New Zealand the only GSM network is run by Vodafone, so if you buy a GSM phone you can only use Vodafone.
Telecom operates a CDMA (Code Division Muliple Access) "format". Many countries also have CDMA networks and CDMA phones work overseas fine. This format is incompatible with the GSM "format". So you cannot use a GSM phone on the Telecom network and you cannot use a CDMA phone on the Vodafone network. It does not matter if the phone has been used previously or not. Really you have to decide whether you want to use Vodafone or Telecom and then buy the correct phone for the network.

You may be able to unlock the phone using the PIN Unlock Key code but you'd be best to ring Vodafone and talk to them about this. I would say it would be unusual for the legitimate owner of the phone to lock it by entering the incorrect PIN. It sounds suss to me.

Lizard
25-02-2004, 03:33 PM
It's likely the phone was "found", and after the "finder" tried the most common PINs, the phone locked, and s/he is now trying to sell the phone as a "locked" phone. Very common...

yingxuan
25-02-2004, 04:03 PM
anyway to unblock the fone?

yingxuan
25-02-2004, 04:04 PM
oh ok just found out i left out something to read.!!

godfather
25-02-2004, 04:19 PM
If the GSM phone is saying "blocked" when using any SIM card (including a prepaid SIM card), and the phone was bought from overseas, then its most likely "locked" to an overseas network as a prepaid phone.

Best advice is to forget it, its probably not worth trying to find anyone with the code and software to unlock it, apart from the overseas network operator its locked to, and they will be unlikely to co-operate.

Usually these phones are totally unuseable here. I have seen these before and the owners given up.

Alasta
25-02-2004, 06:44 PM
It's true that CDMA handsets will work overseas if you're on global roaming, but you can't connect a CDMA handset permanently to a network other than the network for which it is purchased. This is because CDMA handsets have software customised for particular networks and it is usually impractical and uneconomical to change the software.

In all honesty, the CDMA system is very inflexible.

Alasta
25-02-2004, 06:50 PM
If the phone still doesn't function with a different SIM, then the block is obviously on the phone rather than the SIM itself.

SIM cards get blocked when a user incorrectly enters their PIN a certain number of times (three times, I think). A phone gets blocked if its IMEI (a unique number which identifies the handset on the network) gets blacklisted by the network provider.

In the latter case, you can almost guarantee that the handset has been stolen and there is no way that you will be able to get it to work unless you can convince the network provider to unblock it (which is highly unlikely).

John H
26-02-2004, 03:13 PM
The comments about unlocking phones seem to be quite accurate. As I understand it, phones are locked to a particular network in countries where there is competition and your service provider wants to stop you easily changing to their competition. There are various ways of unlocking them, but obviously that has no relevance to the GSM v CDMA issue.

I think I will stay with GSM (ie Vodafone in NZ), because GSM seems works well here, and I have found it easy to roam with internationally - OK, I have only done so in Oz, but my daughter has used her GSM phone in a number of countries.

This is from a 15 Sept 2003 story:
"The GSM community celebrated another milestone in August as membership of the GSM Association (GSMA) broke through the 200-country barrier. New countries joining the GSM community recently include exotic locations such as the Bahamas, Kiribati, Comoros, Guatemala, Dijbouti (the 200th country), and Timor Leste (the 201st), Honduras (202) and Guyana (203). Including the most recently added countries, the GSM Association said 99.7% of the world’s population now lives in countries that have selected GSM."

Not sure what the equivalent figures are for CDMA.

I use a Treo 600 here, which comes out in both GSM and CDMA models for those countries that have both kinds of network. Judging by various US websites and user groups, the GSM model seems to be trouble free with their networks, but there seem to be various problems with the CDMA networks using essentially the same phone.

Alasta
26-02-2004, 04:41 PM
Network providers don't SIM-lock handsets to stifle competition.

In many countries, network providers sell handsets at a loss on the basis that the ongoing call revenue will more than cover that loss. The purpose of SIM-locking is to prevent these subsidised handsets from being connected to another network before the original network operator have recovered their costs.

Having said that, there seems to be a trend away from subsidising handsets because consumers seem to be becoming more comfortable with hire purchasing handsets. Vodafone New Zealand no longer subsidise any of their handsets and therefore all handsets purchased locally should be unlocked.