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craigrob
20-02-2004, 08:58 AM
Can someone shed some light on the most current and practical books for studying for the compTIA A+ certification.
I have done some research and the "A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide" fifth edition by Michael Meyers, Scott Jernigan seems to stand out the most.
Also is the compTIA the only recognized standard in NZ?
If not what is the most widely recognized standard for NZ and the rest of the world.

ugh1
20-02-2004, 03:59 PM
> Can someone shed some light on the most current and
> practical books for studying for the compTIA A+
> certification.
> I have done some research and the "A+ Certification
> All-in-One Exam Guide" fifth edition by Michael
> Meyers, Scott Jernigan seems to stand out the most.
> Also is the compTIA the only recognized standard in
> NZ?
> If not what is the most widely recognized standard
> for NZ and the rest of the world.


Yep, it's a good one if all you wont to learn is enough to pass the exams.

If you wont to learn enough to be more "practical" in the real world then only hands on practise will help.

JohnD
20-02-2004, 04:42 PM
I have used Michael Meyers 4th edition and have found it to be quite good except for the odd silly statement like "DOS may be dead, but the legacy of DOS lives on in every PC used today". My home PC uses Linux only & I can assure Mr Meyers that there is no reminant of DOS there!!

Graham L
21-02-2004, 02:47 PM
Actually, he is quite correct. Your computer won't start without the BIOS code which is very much DOS based. The disk partition tables are DOS. :D

JohnD
21-02-2004, 10:25 PM
Graham - I accept that your depth of knowledge is greater than mine but I want to question you on this one (however it might turn out to be a matter of semantics?)

BIOS routines are firmware and DOS (by definition) is on disk. The original BIOS routines and the first version of DOS must have been written about the same time and must be able to communicate with each other (which is probably what you mean by "DOS based"?)

Question answered?

John

beama
21-02-2004, 11:55 PM
soory for this john could resist
DOS Disk Operating System
does linux run from disk? :D

mark.p
22-02-2004, 07:47 AM
As for dos being dead, far from it. Nortons Ghost anyone;) Oops..................

ugh1
22-02-2004, 01:56 PM
> Graham - I accept that your depth of knowledge is
> greater than mine but I want to question you on this
> one (however it might turn out to be a matter of
> semantics?)
>
> BIOS routines are firmware and DOS (by definition) is
> on disk. The original BIOS routines and the first
> version of DOS must have been written about the same
> time and must be able to communicate with each other
> (which is probably what you mean by "DOS based"?)
>
> Question answered?
>
> John

Could not resist having Mike up on that one either, so I emailed him and his response was he is refering to a "disk operating system" and not to any particular type or brand of DOS.

I did mention too him that he should make the statement a bit clearer.. perhapes he has in volume 5?

Graham L
22-02-2004, 02:47 PM
The BIOS ROM contains standard DOS code routines to control the keyboard, disk drives, and video. Those routines are callable from DOS using the INT mechanism.

A PC clone with a "standard" BIOS in rom should complain that it can't find IBM BASIC if there isn't an OS on any disk it knows about. :D The IBM 5150 came with a tape interface. Floppies were expensive. Who needs an OS when you've got BASIC? :_|

I've got a box somewhere in the heap which has DOS (v1 !) in ROM. It is a word processor, which boots DOS, and the AUTOEXEC.BAT loads and runs the programme. A Ctrl/c gets a DOS prompt. I'm going to play with it some more one day ...

robert6655
24-02-2004, 04:34 PM
right back to the actual topic, get hold of the user on here named "growly" he is a good friend of mine and has just recently been working on A + certification courses and he had a REALLY huge book (cant remember the title) but it was golden and hardcover and about a4 sized and maybe 10cm thick, he ha just been through all this so talk to him and you might get an answer

Growly
24-02-2004, 05:44 PM
Its me.

Last year i worked on the A+ course at WelTec, but due to still going college never made it to the exam. I have "A+ Certification All-In-One guide" Written by Michael Meyers. With discount it was about $129.

It's american, and takes the long way around explaining points, but if you're in for some rather lame humour go ahead. Otherwise it is quite indepth, and broken up nicely.

I'm now studying Network+ (much more indepthly), and am using the Network+ book from the same series (and the same author)

Barnabas
25-02-2004, 08:57 AM
On a side note the exam changed back in Nov 03 so make sure that you get a very recent edition book. The new exam has stuff on Win XP, P4's SATA, USB 2.0 and firewire etc.
Have a look here http://certcities.com/editorial/exams/story.asp?EditorialsID=82 for some useful info.
Cheers.
B.

craigrob
26-02-2004, 07:05 PM
Thanks everybody, have already purchased the "All in 1 A+ certification exam guide" by Michele Meyers 5th edition and seems to be the most current version. By the way if anyone is looking for this book in Auckland try Tech Books on Broadway Newmarket, as it's the cheapest around for this book anyway @ $110.00

Cheers all, now back to the study.

zminos
26-02-2004, 08:14 PM
A+ is great and I sorted out a few things for me, and in some cases I learn't something.

do you feel a but?

The joke is that A+ means you know what all the stupid questions are and the answers - including anti-static etc...

I have personally seen new grads ( of A+ ) that don't even know how to find pin 1.

A+ means you've passed your FIRST part of your IT apprenticeship.

:)