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JJJJJ
30-01-2004, 08:41 AM
I have just removed everything off a hard disk and re-formatted all 40 megs to NTFS.
Question: Can I install SuSe 8.0 on to this format?
If the answer is "No" , what do I have to do next.
Jack

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 08:50 AM
Yes, you can resize the partition and it'll be fine. Just make sure you Defrag and Scandisk entirely before you continue and install Linux.
This is HDD Partitioning, please dont miss that out.... Its a very important part and things go wrong if you skip it... Speaking from experience here :p

Im pretty sure you can use the SuSE Installer to do this.
If not, then boot off a Knoppix Disc and use partmagic :-)
Hope this helps


Chill.

JJJJJ
30-01-2004, 08:56 AM
Sorry Chill, I don't quite understand. I don't want to partition. I just want to install suse and let it have all the disk.
Jack

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 09:02 AM
Im not sure if SuSE supports this, however there is others that do.

There are Linux's out there that'll let you install onto a "Loopback Filesystem".

Its basically where it makes a file on your Windows Partition somewhere called something to the effect of "Linux". This will appear as a single file, but all your Linux contents will be in that one file.

You've got Ntfs which is good (You can have a linux install bigger than 4 gigs, as 4 gigs is the largest a file can be for Fat32), but its also bad because you Must have a distro that's using the 2.6 kernel (Not many do yet), or supports NTFS writing with the 2.4 kernel.

I'll have a quick look for a Distro I saw a while back which should let you do that, but I dont think that SuSE will sorry.


Chill.

bmason
30-01-2004, 09:04 AM
You can't install linux on NTFS, but the SUSE installer will include an option to replace the NTFS partition with linux partition(s).

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 09:06 AM
Actually, you can:
http://topologi-linux.sourceforge.net/index.php

Its Slackware based which is cool, slackware is a speedy little Distro.

Down side is that because its a loopback file-system, you're never going to reach Linux's speed potentials!!

Hope this helps


Chill.

JJJJJ
30-01-2004, 09:15 AM
Thanks. If the SUSE installer will change the NTFS partition, to whatever, that's all I need. I think ??
Jack

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 09:20 AM
Here's another URL for thos who are wanting to try Linux, but not partition their PC:
http://www.colinux.org/

If anybody tries it, could you please let me know how you get on. I would download it and try it, but I dont have a Doze PC in the house... Although I could try running it under Wine :D

I think its similar to Cygwin?

Jack>
If you install SuSE, it'll either re-partition it so you can keep some of the NTFS drive, or it'll fully take over if you allow it :-)

Linux will be using Ext3 and SWAP partition types.


Chill.

JJJJJ
30-01-2004, 09:27 AM
Thanks again Chill, I realy don't understand what you say, but my intention is to let LINUX have the whole computer.
So linux will modify my ntfs partition to suit and will then install? Agree?
Jack

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 09:31 AM
Correct :-)

forrest44
30-01-2004, 09:54 AM
Umm... I wouldn't try installing linux on NTFS.

Linux uses the EXT3 (or EXT2..) filesystem.

When you come to the partitioning part of the installation format the whole hard disk for EXT3 (if you want to run windows as well youll need to partition the disk in half, half for FAT32 or NTFS and the other half for EXT3).

Install linux on the EXT3 partition you made. Only thing is that windows can't see past LILO (in my experiences with win98SE, not sure about GRUB), so you'll want to partition for windows and linux, install windows, then install linux along with the bootloader.

Cheers
Forrest.

JJJJJ
30-01-2004, 10:12 AM
I don't want to install windows! I am installing Linux. It is going on to a 40 gig hard disk. Just a single partition.
Chill answered my question. He says that linux will re-format the disk to whatever system it needs.

JohnD
30-01-2004, 10:24 AM
The process will be to delete the NTFS partition and create new partitions using ext3 or Reister. The installer should allow you to do this. I suggest a mimimum of /boot, /, /home and swap.

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 10:35 AM
I'd just let it work its own magic to be honest. Im pretty sure that SuSE does that anyways :-)

What about xfs? ;-)

Chill.

Dolby Digital
30-01-2004, 11:51 AM
When I was first playing with Linux, I installed RedHat 7.1 onto a FAT32 partition and booted into it via a floppy (under Windows it was just one massive .img file). It worked fine except they said that it would run a bit slower as it wasn't a native Linux partition.

JJJJJ
30-01-2004, 12:34 PM
What the hell's "xfs" ????????????????????

bmason
30-01-2004, 01:22 PM
Short answer: Don't worry about it.

Longer answer: Its one of the many filesystems linux can be installed on natively, along with ext2/3, reiserfs, jfs, etc. SUSE will pick one for you.

Chilling_Silently
30-01-2004, 01:33 PM
Dolby>
Yeah, That's how I first installed Linux too, with Redhat 7.1
That doesnt seem to work anymore, I believe they removed loopback rootfs support in 8.0?

Jack>
Dont wory about xfs, I was only taking the piss when ReiserFS was mentioned ;-) Its just another File-system as Bmason said :-)

My XBox lags quite a bit though because I've not done a native install... It does slow down a lot, but not too much that its unbearable :-)

Not that you need to know that seeing as you're just going to follow along with what SuSE gives you partition-wise :-)


Chill.

Graham L
30-01-2004, 04:26 PM
And the easiest way to do an installation is to give the Linux installer an empty disk with no partitions.

I like ext3. The journalling works.

bmason
30-01-2004, 08:47 PM
> I like ext3. The journalling works.

That reminds me of an interesting story about the time I was using ext3 and tripped over the powercord....