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View Full Version : why installed game keep asking for cd?



amijinx
14-01-2004, 10:00 AM
I just bought No One Lives Forever 2 and everytime I try to play, it will ask for the game CD. How do I save or install everything on the computer without having to pop in the disk everytime?

Thank you.

chiefnz
14-01-2004, 10:08 AM
It's a form of copy protection... as far as I know I don't think you can play the game without the CD in the drive. When you get asked for the CD it's the game's way of making sure that everything is legal.

cheers
chiefnz

Megaman
14-01-2004, 10:11 AM
i have a method but i'm not sure if its legal. i'll ask my dad who's a lawyer and i'll get back to you

stu140103
14-01-2004, 10:16 AM
> It's a form of copy protection... as far as I know I
> don't think you can play the game without the CD in
> the drive. When you get asked for the CD it's the
> game's way of making sure that everything is legal.

I have to agree with chiefnz here, there is not much you can do about it.

amijinx
14-01-2004, 10:22 AM
Oh ok, thanks for the explaination. But why other games like MOHAA do not ask for game cd? Just curious.

Biggles
14-01-2004, 10:39 AM
It's all down to the publisher and how they want to handle copy protection. Some games, of course, give you the option for a partial install of files to save hard disk space, and in this case require the CD to get info not stored on the hard drive at various stages, but mostly its just copy protection.

For example, you can usually take the disk out again once the game has started and it won't affect the game at all since it verifies the legal disk just at game start-up.

For the legimate user it's annoying, and for this reason some people resort to "no CD" hacks found on the internet that let you play the game without the CD. However, since this is also an obvious and often used way for non-legit users to play games without payiong for them, it is our policy not to discuss such hacks or provide links to them in this forum.

agent
14-01-2004, 10:46 AM
It would most likely depend on the distributors choice as to whether a game needs the CD inserted to be played, or not.

Note that the only time "no-CD" cracks should be considered even slightly legal is when you are using them for games you have legitimately bought, because you get annoyed about having to insert the CD to play the game. However, inserting a CD to play a game is no mean feat, so unless you are incredibly lazy, there should be no reason at all to resort to a "no-CD" crack.

In the US, interpretation of the DMCA might suggest that cracks are illegal because they can be used to circumvent copy contol protections. New Zealand doesn't have a DMCA, but using a crack you are still circumventing a method used by the holders of copyright to protect their product.

somebody
14-01-2004, 10:52 AM
What about CD Emulators? would they be legal?

agent
14-01-2004, 11:00 AM
Er... umm...

Well my argument would be that CD emulators are hardly necessary; though I have used them sometimes to speed up installations (theoretically, anyway).

That said, if your CD drive has problems coping with copy protection for some reason or another, a CD emulator would most likely solve this problem, and it would be for a completely legitimate reason. Of course, with the cheap prices of new CD drives today, it would be just as easy to buy a new CD drive than CD emulation software. Granted, there are free emulation programs such as Daemon Tools, but one would assume you would first have to get an image of the CD onto your HDD, so that would require a different CD drive in any case.

I know some people like to use CD emulation to speed things up, or to protect original discs from scratches, and these can be considered legitimate purposes in my mind. Using emulation software because you do not have an original of a CD, but have an image of the CD, is utterly illegal.