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Winston001
06-12-2003, 06:17 PM
Why is there so much attention paid to this Peanuts character on PF1?
Was Charles Schultz a geek?
Who was that little red haired girl? Susan?

Signed
Deeply Puzzled
Bluff

Dolby Digital
06-12-2003, 06:43 PM
Dear Deeply Puzzled from Bluff,

Yes, Charles Schultz was one of the original Unix developers, he did his cartoons on the side. Hence the subtle reference to the Linux character.

Yours,
Tom Scott

mark.p
06-12-2003, 06:58 PM
> Why is there so much attention paid to this Peanuts
> character on PF1?
> Was Charles Schultz a geek?
> Who was that little red haired girl? Susan?
>
> Signed
> Deeply Puzzled
> Bluff

Surely you are mixing Linux up with the Peanut character Linus http://www.snoopy.com/comics/peanuts/meet_the_gang/meet_linus.html

Mind he does have a security planket...................

-=JM=-
06-12-2003, 09:54 PM
> Surely you are mixing Linux up with the Peanut character Linus http://www.snoopy.com/comics/peanuts/meet_the_gang/meet_linus.h tml

> Mind he does have a security planket...................

Do you know why Linux is called Linux?

mikebartnz
06-12-2003, 09:59 PM
I always thought it was the combination of Linus and Unix

Chilling_Silently
06-12-2003, 10:27 PM
Yeah... Linus Torvalds... Unix..

IIRC, He was finishing College and wanted an OS that was similar to what they were using at college for his own PC (Unix), and so began working on Linux (Couldnt call is Linus coz that's too self-obsessed).
And, IIRC, he released kernel 0.1 which contained 10,000 lines of code.

GNU = GNU's Not Unix
The FSF (Free Software Foundation) also began working on a Unix-like OS, but was aptly named GNU as it wasnt Unix. They were working on their own kernel at the time, but were going about it in a different way to Linus.

Segfault or Jen will correct me if Im wrong ;-)

Dolby Digital
07-12-2003, 08:32 AM
>>but were going about it in a different way to Linus.
My understanding is that Linus's kernel is more traditional in design. The FSF's kernel used a more modern technique which was more complex and therefore was taking longer to get going.

mark.p
07-12-2003, 09:06 AM
> >>but were going about it in a different way to
> Linus.
> My understanding is that Linus's kernel is more
> traditional in design. The FSF's kernel used a more
> modern technique which was more complex and therefore
> was taking longer to get going.

I'm guessing you are refering to GNU HURD. Its a Mach microkernal as opposed to the Linux monolithic design. And is still being developed-http://www.gnu.org/software/hurd/hurd.html

Winston001
07-12-2003, 12:46 PM
Well guys and gals - I am bemused and amused all at once. Most informative. Thankyou.

Dolby Digital
07-12-2003, 01:14 PM
>>I'm guessing you are refering to GNU HURD
Very good. I wasn't sure of its name as I haven't gone into that area.

Graham L
07-12-2003, 01:42 PM
There is also the point (whicu is often made by the FSF people ;-)) that Linus produced the kernel. The OS should be referred to as GNU/Linux.

Almost all of the utilities (compilers, text processors, libraries, etc are from GNU ...) and Linus couldn't have done it without them. Almost all the OS functions have been around for a long time because they were written for "real" Unix.

It was a matter of timings ... there were three BSD Unix projects active at the time as team operations and still going, as well as the GNU kernel.
The BSDs have different concentrations ... NetBSD has lots (60+) of platforms, FreeBSD and OpenBSD go for security and ? . They are all working together on security.

Linux runs on only about 8 platforms.

mark.p
07-12-2003, 02:07 PM
Hey Graham isn't it real UNIX? -http://www.bell-labs.com/history/unix/ ;) Considering the Linux kernal was originally designed for the x86 platform as opposed the NT based windows, that with its HAL is multiplatform, (or ment to be -MS seem to have reduced the platforms it runs on) Having 8 platforms now isn't too bad don't ya think. I guess a good thing about Linux is it make the general populous realise there are alternatives to MS offerings. I'd never heard of UNIX and BSD untill I started researching Linux a few years ago.