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View Full Version : How much for XP in partition ?



DutchKiwi
06-12-2003, 06:55 PM
Dear friends,
so I am going to partition my new 40 GB harddisk in a partition for the OS and prorams and data. That makes 3 partitions. Now how big do I make the OS partition for Windows XP professional? And some say I do not need to make a partition for the swap faile since under XP this would be irrelevant. What would you guys say?

Shall I save some money for expensive partition programs and just use fdisk or is that silly ??

Cheers

Johan

tweak\'e
06-12-2003, 07:13 PM
i would set aside minimum of 10gig for the OS.

no need for other partitioning programs as XP has its own which is part of the setup.

Chilling_Silently
06-12-2003, 08:03 PM
Ive installed WinXP on a 1.2GB HDD... Swap was on another drive.. and it was majorly cramped, so give it more....

Some programs cant install on other partitions, so Im gonna debate 10 gigs and say 3... ;-)

Archibald
06-12-2003, 10:00 PM
I would go for a 10G OS partition as you will need the extra space over time and split the remainder for your other two partitions.

Archibald
06-12-2003, 10:06 PM
> gonna debate 10 gigs and say 3... ;-)

Sorry Chilling, I'm going to debate your 3Gigs. (future proofing) ;)

robsonde
06-12-2003, 10:07 PM
I gave it 6Gb and had the swap on D:

its getting a bit tight after a year of use so 10GB sounds good.

Mzee
06-12-2003, 11:53 PM
I run Xp with 4 partitions.
The Primary partition is 3.5 gigs. The swap file is not allowed in the primary partition & only essential software is allowed in it. 'System restore' is disabled. The reason for this is so I can make quick 'Ghost' image files of the system.
The second partition is titled 'Backups' and contains Ghost Images & favourite software files. From time to time I can burn the 'Ghosts' to CD.
Third partition is 'Programs' for all active software.
Fourth partition is Data for all my work and Data files.
I do not use 'My Documents' in 'C'. You can move it to 'F:Data' if you wish.
If I ever have any trouble, I just 'Ghost' over 'C' & in a few minutes its up & running again.

Greg S
07-12-2003, 03:11 AM
My XP is on a 5gig partition, but I wish I'd made it 10 gigs. However your HD is a bit small, so maybe go about 7 gigs.

>The swap file is not allowed in the primary partition

Not sure about that - I have a swap file on my primary partition

kiwibeat
07-12-2003, 06:16 AM
10 gigs is about right if you intend to put a lot of programs or games onto it do a fixed swap file of around 600 megs preferably onto another HDD if you have a spare one ,

Chilling_Silently
07-12-2003, 08:07 AM
Okay, I surrender... 10 it is.. ;-)

DutchKiwi
07-12-2003, 12:38 PM
Thanks a lot guys, still open in the debate: where to o with the swap file. Ideally on a separate harddrive, but do I let it in the OS partition or in the program one or in a separate one?

Ta

Johan

tweak\'e
07-12-2003, 01:07 PM
i would just leave it in the OS partition. a good comprimise between wasting space and risking "out of memory errors".

DutchKiwi
07-12-2003, 05:17 PM
But do you then put all the programs, XP office etc etc in that same directory or is it solely for the OS ?

Cheers

tweak\'e
07-12-2003, 05:26 PM
read the partiton FAQ.

for general users its best to install any OS intergrated program on the same partion as the OS. also most programs you want running at startup (eg antivirus) are best on the OS partiton. programs such as office and most other MS programs are best on the OS partition simply because if you format the OS partition and reinstall you will then need to manaually delete the program before you can reinstall it.

all other program can go on another partition and all data that dosn't need high speed access you can have on the last partition on the drive.

ilikelinux
07-12-2003, 06:07 PM
it actually depends on what you are going to be doing whith it,


Mine is a 5 gig, (must change it to 10 some time), Donno how it works, but i had xp on a 2 gig hard disk with swap in there as well

Ten should be the recommended min.

Linux will run fine on 2gb tho....

agent
07-12-2003, 06:08 PM
I don't see how some of you need 10GB for your OS partition.

I have done a highly customised unattended installation of Windows XP Pro, for both the trial version I used and the full version I now use. In total, the time I have used them is about 1.5 years.

I partitioned my HDD (40GB, too) into ~3GB (C:), ~24GB (D:), and ~10GB (E:). I installed the OS onto the C:, and that is all I put there, aside from programs where you cannot specify the place of installation (I also installed MS Office there, though I cannot remember if you can tell it to be installed on another drive). Everything else goes on my D drive.

As yet, I have not run out of space on the OS partition. In fact, I have more than 1GB free space, and I also have System Restore enabled on that partition, though hibernation is disabled.

Your preference really depends on how much memory you have (as the swapfile size will be dependant on that) and how strictly you keep to having the C drive as an OS partition.

And despite the countless times I've said it on this forum (okay, maybe not countless, but quite a few), it appears people still think that having the swapfile on a separate partition is good. Again it's personal choice, but having the swapfile on a separate partition will slow down access times to the file. The reason for this is that, if located on the first partition, the swapfile is located relatively close to the physical start of the drive, and so access time is very fast. Unless you have the swapfile on a partition on a second HDD, the time it takes the drive to access the sectors where the swapfile is located will increase.

I will admit, however, that the time it adds is negligible in general use of your computer, and it does reduce fragmentation of the swapfile - though if you regularly defragment your partitions, this does not matter anyway.

Can anyone confirm that the swapfile should be 1.5 times the amount of memory you have? I think I heard that somewhere, eg, if you have 256MB of RAM, if you have a specified swapfile size, it is best for it to be 384MB. Otherwise, letting Windows manage the size of the swapfile will keep it at the best size.

agent
07-12-2003, 06:12 PM
I must get into the habit of using the Preview function...

Anyway, I will add that, using the unattended installation, I specified that the 'Documents and Settings' folder be located on the D drive. I would assume some of you have it on the C drive, and hence the reason why you need such large partitions for your OS drive.

Susan B
07-12-2003, 08:45 PM
I have also got a 10GB partition for Win XP and it also has all my programs on it as well. It is ample room and I still have a couple of gig or so spare. Can install more programs on other partitions if I want to, or clear out the ones I rarely use.

If you do not have Partition Magic it can be a bit of a pain resizing partitions later so it is best to get it right the first time. ;-)

DutchKiwi
16-12-2003, 04:00 PM
can that folder be relocated in retrospect ?

Cheers

Johan

Susan B
16-12-2003, 05:21 PM
You do not have to use the default Documents and Settings folder. In fact it is actually a wise thing to create another Documents folder elsewhere and use that because if a profile becomes corrupt it can take all the data in D & S with it.

i-gordon
16-12-2003, 08:54 PM
My recommendation is to buy Partition Magic. I have Partition Magic 8.0 and it has saved me no end of hours of aggro. Most of the aggro I get into is my own fault I admit because I'm a constant fiddler, I try out things, new software, scripts, messing with settings and everything else I should leave alone. With PM 8.0 I can resize,add,delete, convert, set active and alter partitions in all kinds of ways. I have my partitions set up with WIN XP on C: 6GB - Files on D: 54GB and a boot partition on E: a swap file on a separate hard drive F: , and a G: backup partition, H: a small partition I keep all my program exe.files. Everytime I stuff things up I reinstall WinXP,reinstall all my programs from H: and I can get it all running again in about 2.5 hours and all my Excell, Word and other files are untouched all on D:where I left them. What ever you do don't try to install your other programs on a separate partition it can't be done, I know I've tried it. It's OK to keep the exe.files on another partition but they must be installed on C:drive with the OS. This works for me but I have no doubt there are other ways.

tommy
16-12-2003, 10:03 PM
> Everytime I stuff things up I reinstall
> WinXP,reinstall all my programs from H: and I can get
> it all running again in about 2.5 hours and all my
> Excell, Word and other files are untouched all on
> D:where I left them.

If you use a program such as Ghost it will take only 20 minutes to restore your computer back to how it was at the time of the last image.

> What ever you do don't try to
> install your other programs on a separate partition
> it can't be done, I know I've tried it. It's OK to
> keep the exe.files on another partition but they must
> be installed on C:drive with the OS.

That is not correct for the majority of programs. It is recommended that Microsoft Office be installed on C:drive with the OS but other programs may be installed on other partitions.

Greg S
17-12-2003, 03:20 AM
>having the swapfile on a
> separate partition will slow down access times to the
> file. The reason for this is that, if located on the
> first partition, the swapfile is located relatively
> close to the physical start of the drive, and so
> access time is very fast

I honestly thought that that would be the case - never could understand the theory of having it elsewhere.

> Can anyone confirm that the swapfile should be 1.5
> times the amount of memory you have?

I seem to recall that it's XP's help files themselves that give that recommendation.

kiwibeat
17-12-2003, 09:03 AM
If you have the swap file on a different Hard drive it helps with the speed as there are two heads operating at the same time less load to worry about and less jumping from one place to another during times of intense activity .
it also means less to image when doing backups .

kiwibeat
17-12-2003, 09:07 AM
SwaP FILE SIZE is determined by your specific needs if you just surf and burn then 400 megs is fine if you do film editing photo intensive stuff then 600 upwards may be more suitable use cacheman and do the most intensive operations you would normally do then set it at what you feel comfortable with .
I use 500 max so have it at 600 megs on my 98Se PC it can be adjusted in a few minutes any ways

Kame
17-12-2003, 06:35 PM
I have setup a computer on 3 Gigs, it's your above standard PC running, MS Office XP, Adobe Photoshop 7, NAV, NIS. I had to put the swap on another drive though and I moved My Documents to another drive too. I like keeping only the System Files on the System Drive in case of some misfortune.

But this was suitable and minimal I would use. For future proofing make it 6-10Gigs but I don't expect to keep computers longer than 2 years, so the choice is yours.

i-gordon
18-12-2003, 12:25 AM
tommy,
I agree that you can install programs on a separate partition, however if those programs have registry entrys then they will cease to function if windows is reinstalled so having the programs on a separate partition is no use. Some small self contained programs such as the Steve Gibson ones can run and be saved in the event of a reinstall