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View Full Version : Monitor gone in a power spike



fergie
08-08-2003, 06:00 PM
Hi.
Last night, we had a power surge - the lights all went half bright, only one small TV would go, and everything else was dead (though the 'power' lights still worked) - it remained this way for about an hour before it came normal again.
At the time of the event, i was using my PC with a 17" CRT monitor, the screen went blank - yet the PC's power lights were still going - I quickly unpluged all the cords from the wall and hoped that everything was still good.

Unfortunately, when it came back on, and I tried turning it on, the PC went (CDROM, HDD reving etc) but there was nothing on the screen. Theres not even a Power light on it (i've tried it in different plugs - no good)

Anyway, my question is, do monitors have built in "fuses" or something that would protect it from power surges? (BTW - everything was connected into a "surge Protector") or is the monitor no good?
Would it be fixable? or to expensive?

Thanks

godfather
08-08-2003, 06:26 PM
Its not the "half power" (dim lights) that would necessarily cause the problem, its what happened the few milliseconds before that.

The low power would not affect much apart from refrigeration devices with motors, as you noted the PC kept its lights on, they can cope with quite low voltages. The fuse could possibly have blown if the monitor reached the limit of its voltage operating range (lower limit)

The monitor should also cope with low voltages well, but there could have been some nasty spikes at the transition from normal to part power (part power is caused when a high voltage phase is lost)

There probably will be a fuse internal in the monitor for safety reasons. Fuses do not blow due to spikes, they are all over before the fuse could possibly blow.

If the monitor power supply ran out of voltage regulation, it could blow a fuse however, just as it could if there was a major spike induced fault on the monitor circuitry.

So, yes, take it in and get it looked at. Remember your insurance policy?

wuppo
08-08-2003, 06:26 PM
Monitors do have fuses, however something else usually fails to cause the fuse to blow. It may be as simple as a bridge rectifier or varistor near the fuse, shorting causing the fuse to open. So yes, it is worth getting the monitor looked at. In the above case, the parts prices are only a few dollars.

Jester
08-08-2003, 08:20 PM
Sounds like a "Brown Out"

Links:
http://www.elect-spec.com/faqbrwn.htm#Brown-out

If you wish to pursue an insurance claim, contact your power retailer while the event is still fresh in their mind and ask for something in writing to confirm that supply to your address was affected for the stated period. This will certainly help with your claim and can assist in confirming that the event actually caused the power malfunction, rather than it being a product fault.

I do not always suggest that you provide a report on cause and repair/replacement options straight away to insurers, as, in my experience, these generally overstate the problem and suggest repair is not possible. Insurers love disproving this and often have their own preferred suppliers / repairers.

Take into consideration what your excess is too, as repairs may fall under this, or the difference in next years premium may make the whole exercise non-economical.

Finally, ask your power retailer what the actual cause of the event was. Insurers generally wish to pursue recovery, and may have other claims from the same event. It may not be the power co's fault, but a car hitting a power pole somewhere, or a contractor cutting a line etc.

J.
:D