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Julius Caesar
07-08-2003, 03:03 PM
Hi Folks,

I unfortunately did a silly thing with my PC this morning. Unpatient as I can be at times, I went into some troubleshooting!

Well, the problem is that, when I went to lift the CMOS battery up from the battery, the clip which holds the battery in position, broke.

I can still get CMOS, but cannot use the keyboard to enter BIOS.

Any suggestions or remedies. Is this the end for me?


Sincerely
Julius Caesar. (Romantic Emperor)

Julius Caesar
07-08-2003, 03:06 PM
Oops error here....

> Well, the problem is that, when I went to lift the
> CMOS battery up from the battery, the clip which
> holds the battery in position, broke.
>

Should read:

>Well, the problem is that, when I went to lift the
> CMOS battery up from the motherboard... blah blah blah

tweak\'e
07-08-2003, 03:21 PM
just solder a new battery holder in.

however you should still be able to use a keyboard even without a bios battery, sounds like you have other problems as well.

what type of keyboard, usb?

Julius Caesar
07-08-2003, 03:27 PM
> just solder a new battery holder in.
>
I could try that...but umm.. I don't know much about soldering. sorry!

> however you should still be able to use a keyboard
> even without a bios battery, sounds like you have
> other problems as well.
>
> what type of keyboard, usb?


I don't think that I have more problems as it may sound as though I do. I just think that I need to get this battery back into its slot. At the moment, the pc is on its side. (Its not a Desktop PC Case)

As for the keyboard, I could try the other one, which is USB and PS/2
The one which I was using is only PS/2

Graham L
07-08-2003, 04:26 PM
Umm. :_| This is not such an easy repair. You could "probably" remove the holder and replace it. However that's a major operation. And although it would "probably" be successful, those boards are not intended to be repaired. There are multiple layers of circuit tracks, joind by plated through holes. It is possible to destroy the plating in a hole while desoldering. I don't think anyone would guarantee the results. :D

However, all is probably not lost. The battery makes contact at the edge, and at the centre. If you haven't damaged the socket too badly, it should still make contact. All that remains is to hold it in. Superstick packaging tape comes to mind, but anything which will hold the battery down in the socket will work. The ideal would be something with spring (foam tape might work -- stuck to the battery, under the tape).

The Student
07-08-2003, 05:17 PM
Hi,

How about Cellotape or even Superglue the battery at the bottom.

Meanwhile, this could be very bad advice, but the cellotape idea could convieniently be the solution to your problem. (I stand to be corrected)

If you do decide to superglue the battery to your motherboard, then just hope that your battery doesn't die out in front of you within the next month or so.

HTH

tweak\'e
07-08-2003, 05:42 PM
> You could "probably" remove the holder and replace it. However that's a major operation.

nah....peice of cake......if you have the gear ;-) any tech could do it. the curse is having to pull the mobo out of the case and then reinstalling it.

Terry Porritt
07-08-2003, 06:29 PM
They can actually be unsoldered as tweak'e says. fairly easily if you are familiar with an instrument type soldering iron.
You can get a battery holder from a junked motherboard.

It may be possible with a pair of IC type side cutters to snip the old holder off and just solder to the stub ends. Or even solder leads to the stub ends and then solder the holder with it taped in a convenient remote place, taking care that it doesnt short out anywhere.

Note you dont have to lift the battery clip much if at all, there is usually a piece of plastic cantilevered opposite to the clip, so that if you push down on it the battery can be slid out of the holder

ugh1
07-08-2003, 06:56 PM
> Hi Folks,
>
> I unfortunately did a silly thing with my PC this
> morning. Unpatient as I can be at times, I went into
> some troubleshooting!
>
> Well, the problem is that, when I went to lift the
> CMOS battery up from the battery, the clip which
> holds the battery in position, broke.
>
> I can still get CMOS, but cannot use the keyboard to
> enter BIOS.
>
> Any suggestions or remedies. Is this the end for me?
>
>
> Sincerely
> Julius Caesar. (Romantic Emperor)

You could get an external battery that plugs into the old header pins that some motherboards had and if your motherboard does not have an "enternal" battery connector cut the plug off the batery and solder the wires onto the button cell holder.

I have done this before, not tidy looking, but it worked.

Terry Porritt
07-08-2003, 07:12 PM
Just another thing I forgot. The holders with a spring clip make contact through the clip, it's the holders without a clip that contact on the sides.
Ughs way, to solder to existing connectors is probably the best way for a "non-tech" to go.
You hopefully wouldnt even need to remove the broken holder. There may be enough of the end of the clip to solder to, and it should also be easy to solder to the centre contact.

Julius Caesar
09-08-2003, 07:29 PM
Thanks for your help people...

At the moment, I am using a somewhat "anything goes approach" for the mean time just to get my PC up and working. That is, the cellotape approach.

I know it is not the best method, but it does kinda work, but when I practise enough doing soldering, I will then facilitate the 'soldering' methods. However, I am no electrician, and it would cost me twice the price to get someone to fix it, yet this is double the amount for a regular soldering kit.

At the moment, I do have odd problems, such as If I do take the power cable (from the HDD) and find that my CMOS errors are set back to their default settings with the Time set back to January 1 1999.

Would it be an idea to buy another CMOS battery? Or would this approach be a waste of time?

Pheonix
09-08-2003, 07:53 PM
The battery will need to be replaced by the sound of it. Go in to Dick Smith and ask them if they can check your battery, they have the multimeters :) If the battery is OK, then it is your holder that is still the problem.
The battery maintains the systems clock.

Julius Caesar
09-08-2003, 09:55 PM
Thanks Pheonix,

I might just try that!

Graham L
10-08-2003, 03:21 PM
I'm glad to hear that you have taken the safe and simple way ... it's easy for those who have many years of experience (and have things like temperature controlled "soldering stations" and desoldering tools -- I have them too, and the experience :D ) to assume that others have the same.

I would certainly do it the "cheap and cheerful" way ... and only if it didn't work would I use more extreme steps.

Make sure you have "saved" the CMOS settings ... if they are not saved, and the checksum corectly written, things like the clock might be regarded as unreliable, and put back to the default. Autodetection can sort out the disks, time and date are a bit more difficult.