PDA

View Full Version : Network Newbie question



sandy beach
06-08-2003, 11:03 PM
Hi,

I'm curious about some things about networking. Im very very new about networking as such, so please be gentle.

I at the moment I will be networking 2 computers using just Windows 2000, and have all the necessary specs except for the cable.

I get very confused as to which one I should be using. Cat 5 or Cat6 or Cross over Cat 5. If this doesn't make any sense to you, then I understand my confusion. I have got 2 network cards with 10/100mbps (whatever that all means) from dick smith for about $16.00 each.

Secondly, if I was to enable Internet sharing, and if I go online in my room and someone goes or tries to go online in the lounge, would I or the other person in the room wait until I finish surfing any pages? Or would we all be surfing the same pages at the same time?


I apologise for any confusion here.

Thanks

stu140103
06-08-2003, 11:11 PM
> Secondly, if I was to enable Internet sharing, and if
> I go online in my room and someone goes or tries to
> go online in the lounge, would I or the other person
> in the room wait until I finish surfing any pages?

depends on which computer is the computer which has the module in it & have Internet sharing( ICS)

> Or
> would we all be surfing the same pages at the same
> time?

Not necessarily, you could be on Press F1 & the person in the lounge can be on Nzoom.com or any site

I hope that makes sense, if not post back here :)

Murray P
06-08-2003, 11:28 PM
Hi, Tell us a little more about your setup. How do you connect to the internet. dialup modem, broadband (pci, external usb or ethernet, does it have a hub).

If you have a switch/hub or your going to do a direct cable connection will have a bearing on whether you will need a crossover cable or not.

Cat 5 cable will be fine, cat 5e is better and obviously cat 6 is better still but, you wont get near the capacity of the cable on a 10/100 connection. I believe the sheilding is more relevent on the latter two, I'd take advise on that though.

So post back your spec's and we'll give you our best.

Cheers Murray P

sandy beach
06-08-2003, 11:54 PM
> Hi, Tell us a little more about your setup. How do
> you connect to the internet. dialup modem, broadband
> (pci, external usb or ethernet, does it have a hub).

Ok, I have only a dial up modem

> If you have a switch/hub or your going to do a direct
> cable connection will have a bearing on whether you
> will need a crossover cable or not.

Umm... I want to connect these computers together??

> Cat 5 cable will be fine, cat 5e is better and
> obviously cat 6 is better still but, you wont get
> near the capacity of the cable on a 10/100
> connection. I believe the sheilding is more relevent
> on the latter two, I'd take advise on that though.
>
> So post back your spec's and we'll give you our
> best.
>
> Cheers Murray P



I haven't gotten to the stage into buying a cable yet. The only thing I have at the moment is two network cards and two computers. As I am not sure which cable is good for me, as why I have not connected my PC yet.

Thanks Murray.

sandy beach
06-08-2003, 11:56 PM
> > Secondly, if I was to enable Internet sharing, and
> if
> > I go online in my room and someone goes or tries
> to
> > go online in the lounge, would I or the other
> person
> > in the room wait until I finish surfing any pages?
>
> depends on which computer is the computer which has
> the module in it & have Internet sharing( ICS)
>
> > Or
> > would we all be surfing the same pages at the same
> > time?
>
> Not necessarily, you could be on Press F1 & the
> person in the lounge can be on Nzoom.com or any site
>
> I hope that makes sense, if not post back here :)

No. That makes sense to me.

Thanks Stu

sandy beach
06-08-2003, 11:59 PM
As to my specs:

1st Machine:
Pentium 4 2.4Ghz
Windows 2000
Geforce etc..
2xHDD (40Gb) & (13Gb)

2nd Machine:
Pentium 3
450Mhz
40Gb

vk_dre
07-08-2003, 12:15 AM
U should buy the Nokia Hub ports that act as firewalls and also periodiacly change ur IP.

Gorela
07-08-2003, 12:26 AM
Hi Sandy Beach,

If you are just wanting to connect the two computers together you only need a CAT5 crossover cable. Both CAT5 and CAT5e (Enhanced) run at 100Mb/sec. The CAT6 cable is meant to be used for Gigabit networks which your network card doesn't support.

The primary difference between the CAT5 and CAT5e cables appears to be the Mhz rating which I think gives an idea of the clarity of the signal. It doesn't have anything to do with shielding as it is using Unshielded Twisted Pair cables.

If you are just going to purchase a crossover cable from Dick Smith they only seem to be selling CAT6. This is fine, you just won't be able to use it to it's full capacity. It will still permit a nominal transfer rate of 100Mb/sec between the two computers.

Enabling Internet Connection Sharing between the computers will allow both computers to access their own pages at (what seems to be) exactly the same time. It just means that both machines are sharing the available bandwidth, so will access slightly slower.

HTH

Murray P
07-08-2003, 12:42 AM
Ok. I've never shared a connection with dial up before but I don't think its too hard to do anyway, the first thing to do is get you networked.

Have a read up before diving in, if you get into difficulty or have any questions regarding terminology, post back at at PF1. There is a section on networing and sharing a connection in the PF1 FAQ and I have found this (http://www.wown.com/j_helmig/win2k.htm) site to be great, especially for OS specific networking and sharing, another to look at is Tech Tutorials (http://www.techtutorials.com/Networking/). Most of it deals with cable or dsl re the sharing, have a hunt around for dialup.

If your not using a hub you'll need a crossover cable, cat 5, cat 5E or 6 will be fine, with RJ45 plugs on each end to connect to your network cards, once they are installed (BTW, if your thinking of getting broadband or connectiong more computer in the near future, consider getting a switch/hub). Next setup your network protocols, have a read of the FAQ, top right corner of PF1.

HTH Murray P

Murray P
07-08-2003, 12:59 AM
Thanks for clearing that up Gorela, I should have looked up the cable spec's and done some revision before posting rather than drag something out of the jumble.

Cheers Murray P

Chilling_Silently
07-08-2003, 02:47 PM
Just to add a few things:

Firstly, while a Nokia Hub/Router/Firewall/Whatever else they do is good, its only for Dial-Up, so ICS is pretty easy to setup and get going if you are willing to persevere should you run into troubles.

Now, you'll be needing to make the PC's networked first, from there when you know they're both networked fine, then you can go ahead with Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), but until you've got a fully functional network, trying to start ICS would simply cause more headaches for you.

Cat6 is backwards compatible with Cat5 and Cat5e, so any of those above are fine for running your 10/100mbps network (Which is the speed that the network runs at, in this case it will auto-detect that both PC's can run at 100mbps, and so that will be your speed). Crossover simply is a standard cable with the connection's "Crossed Over" so that PC's can connect directly without having to have a hub, switch, or a router to connect the PC's and direct the flow of traffic between them!

ICS is fully legal, Im just saying that as Ive had some people concerned about how it works, and that it's ripping your ISP off or whatever.
Its not, basically what ICS does is takes the main PC which will be connected to the Internet (We'll call it the gateway or host PC) and forwards to the Client PC any data for websites the client tries to access, so as far as your ISP are concerned, there could be 1 or 100PC's connected, and they wont mind!
Its not just limited to website, but any internet traffic will pass through, such as ICQ/MSN etc :-)

I'd suggest you goto DSE, remember what Gorela said (Very well put :-)) and get a Crossover Cable.

You'll then need to setup your network first with your PC's, sharing files is probably a good place to start.

If you get stuck, then you know where to come for help ;-)

Hope this helps

Cheers


Chill.

sandy beach
07-08-2003, 02:48 PM
Hi Guys,


Just thought I'd ask one more question, if so, I was to purchase a hub or a cat5; cat5e what price range will I be expected to pay for these items?

Thanks for your help. I really appreciate your help. Thanks Murray for those websites. I will take the time to research more and be more clear in the long run in the future.

sandy beach
07-08-2003, 02:56 PM
what I really should of said; is that the reasons I would of used Cat 6 is that the length of the cable is efficient enough for me to link my cable to the other PC in the lounge.

It seems though that the majority of Cat 5 cables (correct me if i'm wrong here) do not go further than 5 meters. Had a look at DSE this afternoon and yes there are more cat 6 cables going at least 30 metres. Wow!!

The distance from one computer to another is probably 10 metres.

KiwiTT
07-08-2003, 03:40 PM
Cat 5 cables can run Ethernet 100mbps for 100 metres. Longer than that and you will have problems. For the home user there is negligible difference between Cat 5 and 6 if only connecting 2 pcs at the home.

Susan B
07-08-2003, 04:24 PM
You are in luck -- just last night Babe Ruth kindly provided a link to the Microsoft Knowledge Base article How to Set Up a Small Network with Windows XP Home Edition (http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=813936>) which may be of some help. Even though you are using Win 2000 there would still be parts that apply to your system.

Murray P
07-08-2003, 08:06 PM
You can get cat5(e, 6) from your local electrical supplier. Not sure if they would have it with the plugs fitted already though, I fitted my own to the length I needed. Much cheaper than DSE.

Cheers Murray P

Gorela
07-08-2003, 08:56 PM
Sandy Beach,

The cost of cables and a hub can vary depending on the manufacturer and supplier. As you seem to be looking at DSE I think they have 10Mb/sec hubs selling for about $50 and 100Mb/sec switches for $90-100. To enjoy the same connection speed as you would get from the crossover cables (ie direct connection) you would need to buy the switch and would also need to buy two straight through CAT5/5e or CAT6 cables.

So now you are looking at an outlay of about $150 to get the same functionality as the $30 crossover cable. The only good thing about a hub or switch is that you can connect more than two computers together.

If you were thinking of adding additional computers in the future you can always buy the switch at a later time. You will find that the price will only lower over time and by then you could easily buy some RJ45 connectors and make your 30m crossover into a number of smaller normal cables. ;)

sandy beach
07-08-2003, 10:03 PM
Hiya everyone,

Thanks to Gorela, Murray, and to everyone out there who dedicated their time to help me. I really appreciate it heaps.

Just as long as I have a general idea, I should be fine when I don't feel too embarrased about asking the sales person about networking.

If you feel though I have left out any important things not yet mentioned, please feel free to tell me. I'd rather pay for personal advice than things I have no knowledge about. Also, I will use the FAQ to also help answer some of my questions so that you guys and girls can help some one who also needs some assistance.


Thanks

Chilling_Silently
08-08-2003, 01:42 AM
> Just as long as I have a general idea, I should be
> fine when I don't feel too embarrased about asking
> the sales person about networking.

Well, the people at DSE are supposed to be knowledgable in this sorta thing. It may help if when you go in there you ask to speak to somebody who is fluent with Computer Networking, so you dont get given the run-around to a certain degree.

> Also, I will use the FAQ to
> also help answer some of my questions so that you
> guys and girls can help some one who also needs some
> assistance.

Im sure that was why you've posted here.... ;-)

If you do go in there, dont let them try and sell you something you're not after. I had a friend go in about a fornight ago to buy a Crossover Cable, basically wanting what to do the same as you, and came out with a JetStream/ADSL Router for around $300! Now, this friend was only supposed to spend $30ish on a Crossover Cable...
So it may be a good idea to decide on Crossover Cable or Switch/Hub first of all, before you go shopping :-)

Murray P
08-08-2003, 04:53 PM
You can get a 5 to 8 port switch for $40 to $60 for something that is fine for home or home office. I agree that its not needed unless you plan to expand your network from 2 comps in the near future or add other ethernet componemts such as an adsl router or printer (yes you can get them with usb and ethernet, why?)

BTW. It cost me about $0.75/ meter for cat5e cable, sans rj45 plugs.

Cheers Murray P