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CarlH
24-05-2003, 09:30 PM
I currently have an XP pc, an XP laptop and a W98 pc networked through a switch, and sharing the XP pc's modem.

I'm considering getting Jetstream, and am confused by the variety of modem/routers around.

Do all routers have an adsl modem built-in?

Given I have a switch, I assume paying extra for network connections is a waste?

The laptop may get upgraded to one with a 802.11g wireless card. Can I get a modem/router with wireless, or should I get a separate wireless access point?

Phew! Thanks in advance!

Big John
24-05-2003, 10:25 PM
> Do all routers have an adsl modem built-in?

No.

> Given I have a switch, I assume paying extra for
> network connections is a waste?

Maybe, Maybe not. I have a switch and my ASDL router/modem has a 4 port switch as well. I use the modem switch most of the time but when I need the extras I simply plug the extra switch into it and away we go. Also it is good to take to LAN games days.

> The laptop may get upgraded to one with a 802.11g
> wireless card. Can I get a modem/router with
> wireless, or should I get a separate wireless access
> point?

If you really need the wireless then get it it with it built in as it will be cheaper getting one package than having to buy 2 packages. Also saves extra cabling and power points.

Billy T
24-05-2003, 10:33 PM
All you need is the router and just plug it in to the switch. Configure gateway, DNS & IP address on each computer and way you go. Each computer will have independent net access as long as the switch is powered.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Pheonix
24-05-2003, 10:57 PM
Just to add to your confusion, maybe a basics overview.
The Telecom jetstarter/jetstream service is put over the same pair as your normal telephone and is moved up in frequency so it sits "on top" of your normal telephone speech. Much like radio stations use the same airspace and are "on Top" of each other. Thats why you require these "filters" between all phone devices and the wall jackpoint.
The ADSL modem interfaces to the line. It may be internal PCI or external. To connect to the computer it may use either USB or network. If network, you will require a network card in your computer. But, the handy thing with the network side is that the modem contains it's own address (as if it is another computer attached) . This means that it can be shared by other computers on a network easily. (In your case, plugged directly into your switch)
Now you have your own switch, but to make things easy for people who do not have an existing network, manufacturers provide some modems with their own hub or switch, so that more than 1 computer can plug into it.
Hope this helps, rather than hinders, your understanding.

Billy T
24-05-2003, 11:39 PM
USB is no good to you, stick to ethernet connection.
Apart from the CPU load the USB adds, you have to have the host computer on as well for others to share the connection.

Router + ethernet + switch is the easiest combination to set up and is probably also the cheapest.

Filters are a separate matter relating to the phone line interface and should not be confused with the router set up.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

PoWa
24-05-2003, 11:44 PM
Dynalink RTA300W (http://www.dynalink.co.nz/products/rta300w.htm) sounds like what you need. It includes wireless, 4port switch, and they are about $350.

Billy T
25-05-2003, 12:30 PM
Ummmm..........

Carl already has a switch PoWa, all he needs is a plain vanilla router. No point in spending extra $$$ for surplus technology.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

CarlH
25-05-2003, 05:24 PM
Great info - thanks!

Seems to me I need a router like maybe the Dynalink RTA220 now, and then add a wireless access point off my switch at another time.

As far as I can tell the RTA300W only supports 802.11b, so my potentially fancy new laptop's 802.11g card would be under-used!

Thanks for the help & advice.

PoWa
25-05-2003, 05:27 PM
Yea, but a router with wireless technology??? Thats about the cheapest you can get :p Unless you know of a better one?

PoWa
25-05-2003, 05:29 PM
Oh righto then ;)

JamesStewart
25-05-2003, 05:37 PM
I have a DSE router (V2) and have had no problems with it. Very easy install and support team. Come ready for Ihug and very easy (change 4 numbers) to get to Xtra...

John H
25-05-2003, 05:43 PM
>Seems to me I need a router like maybe the Dynalink RTA220 now, and then add a wireless access point off my switch at another time.

>As far as I can tell the RTA300W only supports 802.11b, so my potentially fancy new laptop's 802.11g card would be under-used!

All of that sounds fine, CarlH, and you are right about the RTA300W. However, just a couple of thoughts - I bought the RTA300 (ie without the wireless technology). By using that router, I was able to flick my switch, thus freeing up precious desktop space and remove a brick from the overloaded junction boxes. I already had a Wireless Access Point - if I could have got rid of that as well without wasting what I had spent on it, I would have bought the RTA300W, which would free up even more space and remove another brick. The RTA300W has a very small footprint by the way.

It would have been nice if I had been able to predict how my needs would change, and what manufacturers were going to come out with... If that had been the case, I would have far less junk littering the desk, and far fewer demands on the power outlets.

However, I understand the issue of the RTA300W only doing 802.11b (which is all that I need - a WLAN that works fast enough between the laptop in the house and PC in my office in an outside building). However, if you cannot do without 802.11g, have a look around and you may find an equivalent that does the router/modem/WAP 802.11g thing all in one - I have a feeling there is a Dynalink model that might do this. Dynalink routers look a bit crappy, but style isn't everything, is it?

John

John H
25-05-2003, 05:54 PM
>I have a feeling there is a Dynalink model that might do this. Dynalink routers look a bit crappy, but style isn't everything, is it?

Sorry, that should have been D-Link, not Dynalink. I always get their names confused. The RTA300W is Dynalink of course, whilst the other manufacturer is D-Link.

I have just checked the D-Link website, and they have an AirPlus Xtreme G DI-624 4-Port Wireless Router that does both b & g (draft). I understand that 802.11g has not yet been signed off, so you do take a bit of a risk buying those products at this stage. Have a look at this: DI-624 (http://www.dlink.co.nz/products/routers/di624/)

Big John
25-05-2003, 07:21 PM
> Carl already has a switch PoWa, all he needs is a
> plain vanilla router. No point in spending extra $$$
> for surplus technology.

He needs an ADSL Modem with Router.

There is a difference as you can get routers just by themselves that are basically a switch in another breed.

CarlH
25-05-2003, 08:07 PM
I'd looked at the DLink DI624, but unless I'm missing something it isn't a modem.....?

godfather
25-05-2003, 09:48 PM
> I'd looked at the DLink DI624, but unless I'm missing
> something it isn't a modem.....?

My guess as well.

A router is a term for a device that connects 2 networks. The DI1624 looks as though it is a router in the sense that it connects a wireless network with a Local Area Network.

You need a router that connects an internet network (via ADSL ) to a LAN, and also to a wireless network.

Something like this (http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/3ed08300066b06a0273fc0a87f9906a5/Product/View/XH1150) however its out of stock at this location.

John H
26-05-2003, 09:58 AM
>I'd looked at the DLink DI624, but unless I'm missing something it isn't a modem.....?

Whoops, yes, you are correct. It is also listed on another D-Link page as a router without built in modem.

My apologies - I should have read the page more carefully. NZ PC World recently did a review of two products that do the 802.11g thing and one of them was from D-Link. I thought it was a modem/router, and that this was the model reviewed. I guess I should riffle through back issues and re-read the review...

John