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lightfoot
21-05-2003, 12:56 PM
Recovery data of an inadvertently reformat partition.

There is a problem with my start-up disk, win 98. The windows seemed to crashed frequently and so I did a ghost reverting the drive. I have two hard drives; a smaller one is drive C, a bigger one, which is larger than the bios can accommodate, is running by promise controller card and is partitioned into two partitions, which designated as drive D and E.

When I did the ghost reversion, I did a reformat the C drive with my start-up disk, which simple as typing at dos prompt format C:

Strangely, it reformatted my D drive.

My question is can the data on D drive a recovered with some program and what would this program called. Also what could be the cause of this problem. Thanks.

rsnic
21-05-2003, 01:18 PM
dos used to come with a program called unformat, you can try and find it, also there is an open source version for freedos, i think it works in ms-dos as well its worth a try
http://www.23cc.com/free-fdisk/
otherwise check this out,
http://www.powerload.fsnet.co.uk/fat32/fat11.htm

Graham L
21-05-2003, 01:23 PM
Oh dear. :_|

You might get very lucky. Try "unformat". The programme might not be on the startup disk ... see if it's on your (still not reformatted :D) C disk. I'm not sure if you still have this with W9x ... you might be able to find it on a DOS6.22 floppy. It shouldn't do any harm (he says, with fingers and legs crossed) in the sense of making things worse. If it can't fix the disk, it won't. ;-)

The format/unformat was intended more for use with floppies (if you didn't use the /u option to format). I'm not sure (because of never having tried) whether the necesary information was saved on hard disks. I think that unformat was pulled from the Windows DOS at some stage.

Anyone else?

Billy T
21-05-2003, 02:01 PM
Hi LF

When you restore a Ghost image there is no need to reformat your C: drive first. The image will write the data back exactly as it was, negating any worthwhile effect the reformat may have achieved.

Abandoning the unnecessary step will help avoid problems such as your present dilemma.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)