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Annanz
02-05-2003, 12:47 PM
Need to take out my internal and I have got Anti Static Wrist Strap which I got told would be safer to use when removing my internal modem.

On the end of the Strap you have got a Alligator clip, where do you attach the alligator clip???

wintertide
02-05-2003, 12:54 PM
You usually connect it to part of the power supply fan grille or onto an unpainted metal part of the case. Turn off the power supply by the switch on the back of it (for ATX systems) first, though, as sometimes the PC can power itself up as soon as you put the card in.

Wintertide

Jams
02-05-2003, 12:57 PM
it sounds like you have no idea what you are doing. you shouldnt really be doing this if you dont know what to do.

but.... the aligator clip, clips to anywhere on the computer chassis (the case) aslong it is being clipped to the metal structure of the case

PoWa
02-05-2003, 05:33 PM
Why do some people tell you to leave the power cord plugged in and plugged into the wall (to supposedly ground it)?

I would have thought that was pretty dangerous as there is 240v going though there!. Wouldn't it be safer to just unplug everything, and just clip onto the case to stop any static charges going where they are not supposed to?

-=JM=-
02-05-2003, 05:52 PM
The reason for the plugin/unplug change is that with older computers when you switched the poweroff it was OFF. Now with modern computers the power stays on unless it is unplugged at the wall.

-=JM=-
02-05-2003, 05:54 PM
Also I usually try to do what I can with the computer running. Only power it off when I have to.

As for antistatic straps they're something you *should* wear. Not entirely necessary really.

tango
02-05-2003, 06:59 PM
if you don't have it plugged into the wall then how is it grounded...

PoWa
02-05-2003, 07:12 PM
My computer has a power switch at the back of it. When you flip that off, it goes *zwippp* and I assume that means all power is off.

What actually are you trying to ground, when adding hardware to a computer?? I thought you are only trying to ground yourself and stop static electricity from frying the circuitry?? Why does the computer need to be earthed?

-=JM=-
02-05-2003, 07:21 PM
I think the idea is that you and the computer are at the same potential. Billy T seems to know about this IIRC.

cyberchuck
02-05-2003, 07:29 PM
> Why does the computer need to be earthed?
Because when you ground yourself, what you are doing is removing the static electricity from your body and giving it to the metal chassis of the computer. However, as it's common knowledge that computers don't like Static Electricity, when your static electricity hits the computer, the computer further passes it onto PSU for the ground pin. So in essence both you and your PC are grounded...
You do not have to have any power switches on, be it at the back of the case, on the wall, etc, because the Earthing cable does not require a switch to manage it - All the switch does is allow the positive and negative electrons to pass through, giving your PC power...
Well that's a rough explanation anyway


CyberChuck

Bazza
02-05-2003, 08:34 PM
Some good information on the correct use & connection of antistatic wrist straps is here:

http://www.pccomputernotes.com/esd/esd2.htm

tango
02-05-2003, 09:05 PM
>>All the switch does is allow the positive and negative electrons to >>pass through


aren't electrons negative?? i failed 6th form chemistry btw :)

even though you're wired to the computer chassis, doesn't there still need to be an earth beyond that? which is why i always thought the computer needed to be plugged in, but switched off at the PSU.

Terry Porritt
02-05-2003, 09:27 PM
Multiple ROFL :) Almost paralytic :)

2003 AD and still elementary electrical theory and practice does not appear to be taught in schools. Reminds me of the days when radios required an earth connection, and many people (in the UK) connected a piece of wire from the earth terminal on the back of the radio and buried the other end in a jam-jar filled with earth :D

Follow Bazza's advice and read his link.

cyberchuck
02-05-2003, 10:15 PM
> >>All the switch does is allow the positive and negative electrons to
> >>pass through

> aren't electrons negative?? i failed 6th form chemistry btw :)

Hehe :p - your right. It was a lapse of the mind (well that's what I'll blame it on anyway :p) I'm doing 5th form Physics and Chemistry at the moment ;)
Yes, the Chassis needs to earth beyond itself, which is why it is strongly reccomended you have your computer plugged in while you work on it... This grounds both you and the computer so you don't get a shock of static electricity, and your computer doesn't die from it


CyberChuck

cyberchuck
02-05-2003, 10:17 PM
> 2003 AD and still elementary electrical theory and practice does not
>appear to be taught in schools.

Hehe :p - we still know not to put a fork up the electric socket though :D otherwise more than one thing ends up going boom ;)... Not that I've tried it or anything!

Murray P
02-05-2003, 10:57 PM
"Also, you have full AC power going to the remote power switch on the front of your computer" from the link above. I thought it was the AT supplies that put 230v to the front switch not the ATX's ??

Cheers

Murray P

wintertide
02-05-2003, 11:35 PM
Yes, only the AT power supplies put 230V AC through to the switch at the front (learned that one the hard way). With AT PCs, the power is controlled by the PSU.
With the ATX motherboards, the power is fed through to a standby cable that keeps a small amount of voltage running through the motherboard. The ATX motherboard controls the power. That's why you have the power button going to the motherboard with ATX PCs and also why you can have Wake on LAN or Wake on Modem on an ATX motherboard.

E.ric
03-05-2003, 12:00 AM
> My computer has a power switch at the back of it.
> When you flip that off, it goes *zwippp* and I assume
> that means all power is off.
>
That interesting PoWa when I turn my monitor on via mains switch it goes "pppiwz"