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wintertide
30-03-2003, 05:23 PM
I have just built a PC with an Athlon XP 2000+ CPU, a TNT2 video card and a Seagate 7200 rpm HDD. I installed 2 80mm fans (the maximum size I could fit into the case), but in Windows XP the case temperature is 42 degrees Celsius and the CPU is 46 degrees Celsius. I feel that I should add more cooling to the PC, but don't know what I should add. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Wintertide

robsonde
30-03-2003, 05:29 PM
anything under 55 degrees is doing good.

tweak\'e
30-03-2003, 05:47 PM
> anything under 55 degrees is doing good.
>

*cough* yeah right ! :p

the case temp seems a little to high. however check with another temp gauge that the motherboard is actually reading right. also check ROOM temp. how are the fans installed? can the case itself flow enough air?

wintertide
30-03-2003, 05:57 PM
Room temperature is around 20 degrees Celsius (with all the windows open), and the M/B temperature gauge seems to be right.
One fan is installed at the front of the case, below the HDD, and the other is mounted at the back, beside the CPU fan. When I actually built the PC (I got it as part of my A+ course), it came with no fans other than the fan supplied with the CPU. The case back then was operating at 50 degrees Celsius normally, with it going up to 53 degrees Celsius when being pushed.
Back then I could not get XP to even boot off the CD, as the hard drive was generating so much heat. I then installed the two fans today, and they seemed to cool down the PC considerably. The hard drive seems to have cooled down a lot now, but I'm kind of afraid to push the PC in XP as I don't want to cook any components.
This article (http://www.pcworld.co.nz/pcworld/pcw.nsf/0ee5f09d452f012dcc2568870012def5/59c31dbda81b81dfcc25693f000bc0bb!OpenDocument) told me that the maximum case temperature should be 44 degrees.
The fans seem to be spitting out enough air to cool the case down.

Btw, I am using no fans on the video card and the PSU fan seems to be barely cooling the PSU itself. I am running a Gigabyte GA7VAX1394 M/B.

Wintertide

whetu
30-03-2003, 06:21 PM
your temps are fine provided you arent putting load on the cpu, however your case temps do seem a tad on the high side - mine never top 33c, and thats with a single 80mm blowhole - panaflo running at 7v (some quite old pics of my case here:
http://forums.overclockers.co.nz/showthread.php?s=&threadid=614&pagenumber=2 )

however if you really want to tweak your cooling, i wouldnt be asking here. what you want to do is look around the net at overclocking websites and forums, especially overclockers.com, overclockers.com.au, forums.overclockers.com.au and forums.overclockers.co.nz
frostytech.com is quite good, as is spodesabode, dansdata, hardocp, radiativenz.com, anandtech.com... the list goes on

as a side note, your computer seems just a tad unbalanced, you might want to consider bringing your video card up to a radeon or gf3/gf4

tweak\'e
30-03-2003, 06:22 PM
if your room temp is 20 degrees then your case temp should be about 25-30.

have you actually messured the room temp or are you just guessing?

what case do you have?

something dosn't quite right. with 20 room temp, 80mm front and rear case fans (assuming there are good enough and installed properly and your not somehow sucking in hot air) then your case temp should be a lot lower than what it is.

tweak\'e
30-03-2003, 06:23 PM
i keep forgetting............take the side of the case off and use a household fan to blow cool air in. what happens to the case temp?

robsonde
30-03-2003, 06:26 PM
> > anything under 55 degrees is doing good.
> >
>
> *cough* yeah right ! :p
>
> the case temp seems a little to high. however check
> with another temp gauge that the motherboard is
> actually reading right. also check ROOM temp. how are
> the fans installed? can the case itself flow enough
> air?


well yes.......

i was looking at the CPU temp rather than the case temp.

Pheonix
30-03-2003, 06:34 PM
Just a thought too. Check the flow of the fans. First, is the power supply sucking (into the case) or blowing. Normally the blow, and if that's the case, make sure the front fan is sucking air into the case, and the rear is blowing out of the case. This creates a good air-flow through the case. Also less chance of recycling the warm air being blown out the back.

wintertide
30-03-2003, 06:42 PM
Yes, I know that my PC doesn't have that great a video card, but it was all I got for $1500 and I couldn't be bothered doing an upgrade to a GeForce 4 (will save up later and buy one). The HDD seemed to generate a lot of heat, which is what is probably generating all the extra heat.

Tweak'e - blowing a household fan into the case did lower the temp - about 8 degrees Celsius. Could just be that the case temp sensor is too close to the CPU, because when I stuck my hand in the case it didn't seem to be around 40 degrees - more like 35.

Pheonix - My fan at the front of the case is blowing cold air in, the one at the back is blowing warm air out. The PSU fan is blowing air out (the fan in it doesn't seem to blow out much air, but what air it blows out is quite warm - warmer than the air coming from the exhaust fan).

wintertide
30-03-2003, 06:45 PM
Sorry - forgot to add:
Case is from Serious Computers in Ellerslie, Auckland.
Has room for a HDD cooler or a temperature monitor/cooler when I have my CD-ROM and CD Writer in the case.
The two 80mm fan spots in the case I have just filled with fans from Dick Smith Electronics - both fans are the Titan brand and are currently running at around 3000 rpm.

tweak\'e
30-03-2003, 08:04 PM
> blowing a household fan into the case did lower the temp - about 8 degrees Celsius

your motherboard is most likly reporting the temps incorrectly. the household fan should make the case temp the same as the room temp.

>Could just be that the case temp sensor is too close to the CPU

doubt it. most are on the bottom end of the mobo (upright case)

one comman thing to watch is what the case is sitting on. i've seen a fair few sitting on/sinking into carpet with the carpet blocking the front air vent.