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DavidG
29-11-2002, 03:39 PM
I understood that if my e-mail program is set up in Mail Format as HTML the text and graphics would be received by another computer just as I send it.
It doesnít. Colour, and graphics yes but text no.
I like to write my e-mails using a TTF font called Marking Pen. If you or any other computer receiving it do not have that font installed it appears on your e-mail program in a standard font like Times Roman.
I even tried sending fancy text from another computer to mine and that also came through plain because I didínt have the same font.
I read that the program Incredimail would set up e-mails to your own design, (which I assume means others would receive that design) so I tried it and that does exactly the same --- fine on my computer, plain text on the receivers.

My specs are : Windows 2000 pro SP2, Microsoft Outlook 2000 using Word as the editor, Internet Explorer 6
Is there any adjustments I can make to overcome this problem, perhaps there is another e-mail program that will do what I expect, or is that how it is supposed to work.

Thank you for your time.

David G

Shroeder
29-11-2002, 03:45 PM
My understanding is that the other computer will always need the font to be installed or it will revert to its default font.

Also worth noting that a lot of people prefer to receive plain-text emails only as it reduces the likelihood of accidentally receiving embedded virus'

tweak\'e
29-11-2002, 03:56 PM
and to add to Shroeder, some of us (exspecialy with poor net connections) don't exactly like bloated emails. nothing worse than waiting 5 min for an email to download and all it say is "hi".

Susan B
29-11-2002, 04:00 PM
For HTML emails try and keep your fonts to the standard ones that most computers will have. There aren't many but at least the formatting should be preserved.

You could also enquire of your recipients what fonts they have installed, if you regularly send emails to the same people, and you will then be able to use those fonts in your emails.

DavidG
29-11-2002, 10:12 PM
Thanks for the replies, i assumed as web pages loaded quickly with fancy text e-mails would do the same

tweak\'e
29-11-2002, 10:27 PM
> Thanks for the replies, i assumed as web pages loaded
> quickly with fancy text e-mails would do the same

yes and no.

if you get lots of email useing text you might get say 1meg of email but with HTML it can go to 3 meg which takes a fair while to download.

its not so much the fancy text (i think u can do fancy text in text format) but all the added HTML code thats in the background. add background pic, sounds and your 10meg email box gets filled really fast.

tweak\'e
29-11-2002, 10:31 PM
opps HTML is required for fancy text :(

Susan B
30-11-2002, 08:18 AM
>> i assumed as web pages loaded quickly with fancy text e-mails would do the same

Fancy text alone won't be too bad but like tweak'e says if you also add a background picture, some graphics, icons and all the rest of it, it soon becomes quite a large file.

I don't understand why HTML emails (with graphics) take longer to download than webpages but they do. They also take up A LOT of room on your hard drive if you like to save them all. Not a problem for those who have large hard drives with plenty of room but not everyone does.

At work our head office and a few other places send all their emails with coloured fonts etc and I've noticed OE is starting to groan since the boss won't delete anything.

tweak\'e
30-11-2002, 08:48 AM
i think they do take simelar time to download BUT, most people download a web page 1 at a time, but downloading 10 email can be like downloading 10 web pages at once.

the main thing is, if you emil a message its basicly text. when you do it as HTML your strapping a lot of codeing onto the message. the message is still the same wether its text or HTML, so why bother adding HTML. why?? cause peole like fancy stuff regaurdless of the bugs/secirty risks etc.

ambasluv
02-12-2002, 08:26 PM
What about sending two emails at once for a little while. A text email with the font file attached, and the prettier Html mail. The text email could contain instructions on what to do with the attachment, and put something like "Read this email before my other one) in the subject line

tweak\'e
02-12-2002, 08:40 PM
sending 2 emails about the same thing is pointless and means even more to download.

TonyF
02-12-2002, 09:23 PM
> HTML. why?? cause peole like fancy stuff regaurdless
> of the bugs/secirty risks etc.

Indeed they do. I have a contact who has been captured by Incredimail. Lots of fancy stuff, animated GIFs etc etc ..........
But not much text.....

Susan B
02-12-2002, 09:31 PM
>> Indeed they do. I have a contact who has been captured by Incredimail. Lots of fancy stuff, animated GIFs etc etc ..........
>>But not much text.....

I know what you mean. But with some people you have to be grateful for ANY correspondence at all....... :D

Heather P
02-12-2002, 09:31 PM
Web pages and html emails all use something in common - the html markup language.

HTML doesn't actually contain stuff like font code - it contains a link to the font stored on the recipient's computer. This makes html files much smaller than things like Word documents which stores the font code in the actual document. It does, however, mean that the recipient won't see the fancy font if they don't have it installed.

Another problem is that Macs and PCs don't always contain the same fonts as standards.

This explains why most web pages use one of a very select group of fonts. Headings and logos in a different font are usually stored as images to get round the problem.

ambasluv
03-12-2002, 10:06 AM
Obviously I've been misunderstood... The plain text e-mail only contains the font file, and instructions on where to put it. Okay, sending two e-mails at once can be rather cumbersome, but how many of you have attempted retrieving 3 Mb of e-mails because a 'friend' decided to send you that 102 page list of blonde jokes, and did it with a nice, fancy, stationery-using e-mail? All well and good, unless the best connection you can get to the net is 42.6kbits, ah la me...
Oh and by the way, it took 2 hours, and over 50% were repeats of jokes from earlier in the list, and about half of what was left, he'd sent me before...

Heather P
03-12-2002, 10:13 AM
2 minor problems with that one.

1. The font is probably copywrited
2. Most people won't install it.

ambasluv
05-12-2002, 09:40 AM
Well, that one's new to me. A copyrighted font... Interesting I must say... Makes me feel just a little bit silly. Good call! Looks like you're m8s are going to have to shell out for one of those font cd's, unless you want to break some laws... (not advisable)

Bummer.

I still feel silly...

Heather P
05-12-2002, 12:50 PM
One learns by experience. You've obviously not received a document from a client containing some weird Adobe font that they want matched on their web site.

Lots of fonts are in the public domain but others are copyrighted.