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View Full Version : When someone gets past the 'used by date'



20-02-2002, 12:55 PM
Someone told me that Schools should never take someone on over 40 years of
age as a student with the promise it well lead to a job at the end of the
course because the IT industry will not take on workers over 40 as they have
got to the 'used by date' Schools can however take on students to do IT
subjects as a 'hobby' class. Does anybody have any thoughts on this topic

20-02-2002, 01:14 PM
I have had to struggle to be taken seriously in the IT industry for some time by people 40 and over who run the IT industry.

I'm 26 this year and I studied as soon as I finished highschool.

I've had to work under people near and over 40 who have less experience than I do.

People near and over 40 have more in common with the people who will hire them and their age (derserved of not) will led them credability.

Either that or it's just how Rototua works.

I would be interested to know.

20-02-2002, 02:02 PM
Courses should not take on students with the PROMISE that it WILL lead to a job.

With IT related work there is also the ability to sell yourself as an asset to a business and not just a pasty geek that can only hang out in the backroom as the real world doesn't have the attractions of the cyber version.

Age should not play a part in it, more your experience that relates to the field/ position that you are aiming for.

But age will play a part if someone is trying to build a team and looking at team fit. When the majority of the positions are filled by those 25 years and below this is a disadvantage to someone older entering the industry.

I think 'used by date' is a misleading term to be using. Its a case of more where a new worker will fit into the structure of the company with the skill base that he or she brings.

20-02-2002, 03:14 PM
Gerard, I wish my experience was anything like yours. In October last year I started looking for a job after returning from a long OE (that's Overseas Experience, all you geeks) including years of IT work in the UK and Europe. My last job there was in Amsterdam, managing a huge pan-European integration project, getting paid the sort of money (and living the sort of lifestyle) that makes most people spit tacks. And now, so do I.

Something called me back home, and I came. I'm not complaining, and I love New Zealand, and I'm not going back.

But in five months of diligent searching I have got no closer than one, count them, one, interview. And that was with an agent, not a hirer. Most agencies and companies don't even bother to acknowledge receipt of the application & CV. As none of them have seen me, I can safely assume that it's not my lack of personal hygiene, my hare lip, my club foot, hunchback, baldness, acne, or squint that's putting them off.

Nope, and as I've been careful to target my applications at jobs that I have a good match with, I can only assume that my age, 41, has something to do with it. Trying to find out is a waste of time.

What makes me laugh, is all those ads every Wednesday in the NZ Herald offering training for a great career in IT. Is there really a market for people with no experience? Read the job ads on the internet - only graduates with 2-4 years of Delphi, C++ or Java need apply.

Personally, I'm going back to Uni for a brand new and up-to-date degree. In three years, I'll find out what that's worth too.

Cheers,
Nick

20-02-2002, 03:28 PM
I would like to know where young er people are being hired. Here in Rotorua I've had applications go well until my age was asked and no one wanted to hire someone as you as I.

I've been working where I am for just over two years. They hire people young or forign to get away with paying as little as possible.

21-02-2002, 07:55 PM
Hi Ernie,

contrary to popular belief the IT industry does not discriminate based on age. In fact I personally am very wary of 'whiz kids' as they frequently wade into a corporate environment and cause chaos. I have heard things like 'I've done this a hundred times before, -it'll be fine' only to have it explode without a recent backup. Many younger workers posess a great deal of technical proficiency but there is much more to working that just your skill level. Older workers tend to have superior interpersonal skills, and are better at accepting responsibility for the sucessful completion of a project.

22-02-2002, 11:01 AM
It's your attitude a sweeping generalisations 'wizz kids' That make it so difficult for yonger people to get employed in this industry.

I know from experience that this generalisation (below)is wrong, it's just what is expected of older people before their qualifications/experience is looked at.

'Older workers tend to have superior interpersonal skills, and are better at accepting responsibility for the sucessful completion of a project.'

Younger people can be paid less, if you're 20 or under an employer can really rip you off and legally call it 'youth rates'

22-02-2002, 11:02 AM
It's your attitude a sweeping generalisations 'wizz kids' That make it so difficult for yonger people to get employed in this industry.

I know from experience that this generalisation (below)is wrong, it's just what is expected of older people before their qualifications/experience is looked at.

'Older workers tend to have superior interpersonal skills, and are better at accepting responsibility for the sucessful completion of a project.'

Younger people can be paid less, if you're 20 or under an employer can really rip you off and legally call it 'youth rates'