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BBCmicro
29-04-2018, 01:54 PM
Is there an app for doing physical jigsaw puzzles? I am presently having radiation treatment for prostate cancer and and patients spend a lot of time in the waiting room trying to do an impossible jigsaw puzzle. (My treatment is for 37 days of attendance)

I'm thinking you photograph the box and a group of pieces and the app works out where they go

R2x1
29-04-2018, 03:30 PM
Good luck with the procedure - - -
Better if you could find an app to get the treatment, and the waiting.

;)

BBCmicro
29-04-2018, 05:18 PM
Good luck with the procedure - - -

Thanks. I was lucky - my doctor picked it up with the regular PSA test.
And since it was caught early it hadn't spread anywhere else.

The trouble with prostate cancer is there's no chemotherapy for it. So if it spreads....

allblack
29-04-2018, 06:35 PM
How old are you? I've crossed into the wrong side of 50 so things like this interest me ...

gary67
29-04-2018, 07:29 PM
Thanks. I was lucky - my doctor picked it up with the regular PSA test.
And since it was caught early it hadn't spread anywhere else.

The trouble with prostate cancer is there's no chemotherapy for it. So if it spreads....
Are you sure, my Father was treated with chemo for his in the UK

plod
29-04-2018, 08:02 PM
Are you sure, my Father was treated with chemo for his in the UKSometimes treatment is used not so much as a fix/cure but to slow down the cancer to give some more time. My father unfortunately is in his last few weeks we think after lasting longer then expected. He was told any treatment was purely to give more time. Although non of it worked he has had longer then expected. Sorry for hijacking thread. I know if no such app. Lol

gary67
30-04-2018, 07:32 AM
Sometimes treatment is used not so much as a fix/cure but to slow down the cancer to give some more time. My father unfortunately is in his last few weeks we think after lasting longer then expected. He was told any treatment was purely to give more time. Although non of it worked he has had longer then expected. Sorry for hijacking thread. I know if no such app. Lol

Yes mine was cured they said and then passed a year later of an unrelated problem this Feb

piroska
30-04-2018, 09:15 AM
The trouble with prostate cancer is there's no chemotherapy for it. So if it spreads....

I'm not sure chemo over radiation is an improvement you know.

And a lot of men get it, it does not mean death or spreading.

Think skin cancer, the one that gets you is melanoma, sometimes.
The others don't, although it's still a cancer.

Same with prostrate, watched a doco on it, and there are many men not treated at all, monitored and doing just fine, not ill, with the no need for drastic measures version of it.

kenj
30-04-2018, 11:10 AM
I'm not sure chemo over radiation is an improvement you know.

And a lot of men get it, it does not mean death or spreading.

Think skin cancer, the one that gets you is melanoma, sometimes.
The others don't, although it's still a cancer.

Same with prostrate, watched a doco on it, and there are many men not treated at all, monitored and doing just fine, not ill, with the no need for drastic measures version of it.

My Dr. Friend told me a few years ago that most men die with prostate cancer but not of it. In other words, what you say is correct.

Hey Beeb, hope all goes well with your treatment. :)

Ken 😊

BBCmicro
30-04-2018, 09:15 PM
I'm not sure chemo over radiation is an improvement

Radiation can only be directed at a specific spot. If the cancer is being spread by the blood you need chemo. At least that's how I understand it

If the cancer has spread, hormone treatment can delay death by several years. I think that's what Paul Holmes did. If the cancer hasn't spread, either surgery or radiation can give about 100% cure

Our public hospital system is good and quite efficient but occasionally it has a resource problem and needs to temporarily ration treatment. In the case of prostate cancer the rationing seems to take place between experiencing a suspicious PSA test and getting a biopsy to confirm cancer. The hospital might say that the pattern of PSA results doesn't suggest urgency and so the patient is sent back to accumulate more results. They might wait a year or more this way. But once cancer has been confirmed by a biopsy the hospital is very good at getting treatment underway. So the patient's efforts should be directed at getting that all-important biopsy

Looking back at my experience I would suggest the following:

- have a regular PSA test and take an interest in the results
- if your doctor decides the pattern of PSA results warrants a biopsy, go for it. Get him or her to put pressure on the hospital to do the biopsy promptly
- if the biopsy is likely to be delayed by 6mo or a year, consider getting it done privately (just the biopsy, not the treatment). This is what I did. It cost me $6000 for general anaesthetic and a night in hospital. In retrospect I would try to get it done privately by local anaesthetic, and pay less than $1000. Biopsy by local anaesthetic is the way the hospital does it, and it is not a painful experience. I know this because I had the same experience (biopsy-by-local-anaesthetic) when the hospital inserted some gold pellets in my prostate to provide aiming points for the radiation (a standard procedure). For me, the public hospital is doing everything apart from the biopsy
- choose radiation over surgery. Radiation has made great strides in the last few decades. They use a linear accelerator rather than a powerful radioactive isotope and can target the radiation more accurately and shield nearby organs, and they can do imaging (Xrays) 2min prior to the radiation to make sure the gold pellets are where they should be (and adjust the table to suit). Best of all, they don't 'burn' the target area by killing everything. They adjust the power of the beam so that the DNA of all the cells (good cells and cancer cells) are damaged equally, but the good cells repair their DNA whereas the cancer cells don't. (Their forte is spreading to new existence rather than maintaining their present existence)

Radiation is painless but having to attend 40-odd hosp visits could be a burden for a working person or somebody not living close to the hospital. I am 71, retired, and live within 20min by car. On the other hand, surgery would be quick but you can expect incontinence for a couple of months afterwards. In my case, surgery was ruled out by a hernia mesh adhering to tissues rather tightly which would have lengthened the procedure by several hours - a possible problem for a 70-year old under anaesthetic