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B.M.
13-04-2018, 04:05 PM
A friend of mine is having trouble with his HP ProBook 6550B notebook in that he keeps hitting the Pointing Stick Buttons as he types. (Hes 87 and nearly blind)

So what Id like to know is if there is a way to turn off the Pointing Stick and associated Two Buttons?

Operating system is Mint 18.2 Cinnamon.

gary67
13-04-2018, 07:07 PM
You can under windows it usually called synaptics touchpad (on this laptop) or similar, you will need to look for this under I guess settings in the Mint menu or the equivilant of device manager

Kame
13-04-2018, 08:59 PM
Best guess would be to look in mouse settings, although I don't recall seeing the track/pointer stick. I don't have a laptop with a track stick, so can't test it out.

I know you can use xinput (a CLI program) to disable it and a while back a program called gpointing-device-settings use to create a more advance pointer setting GUI to do this.

wainuitech
13-04-2018, 09:47 PM
Found this how-to-disable-touchpad-while-writing-article-or-documentation-in-ubuntulinux-mint-or-derivatives-linux (http://www.linuxandubuntu.com/home/how-to-disable-touchpad-while-writing-article-or-documentation-in-ubuntulinux-mint-or-derivatives-linux)

NO IDEA if it works, bricks something or makes the penguin squeal - :p

mzee
14-04-2018, 08:22 PM
In Mint click on the Settings Icon in the Start menu, (left side bottom), you may be asked for your password.
About half way down the page that opens (I think its under Hardware) there is an Icon which opens the settings for the Mouse & the Touch-pad. Just slide the switch from ON to OFF.

B.M.
16-04-2018, 11:27 AM
In Mint click on the Settings Icon in the Start menu, (left side bottom), you may be asked for your password.
About half way down the page that opens (I think its under Hardware) there is an Icon which opens the settings for the Mouse & the Touch-pad. Just slide the switch from ON to OFF.

Thanks mzee that worked fine.

Interestingly, whilst the Touch Pad and associated buttons are disabled, the Point Stick still operates but cant do any harm because the associated buttons are disabled.

Anyway, Ill get the computer back to the owner in the next day or two so well see how he finds it. :)

mzee
17-04-2018, 07:49 PM
Thanks mzee that worked fine.

Interestingly, whilst the Touch Pad and associated buttons are disabled, the Point Stick still operates but can’t do any harm because the associated buttons are disabled.

Anyway, I’ll get the computer back to the owner in the next day or two so we’ll see how he finds it. :)

Here are some more tips on Mint that may be useful to your friend:-

1] Password: Mint, like Ubuntu, keeps asking for your password for admin actions. This is a real pain in the butt! The solution is to change the password to Z. It will grumble a bit about 'being too short' but just confirm it.

2] Key-ring: If you install Google Chrome, Mint comes up with a 'Keyring' which is a real pain. When the key-ring appears it will ask for a Master password. ignore it and comtinue. You will get a spiel about keeping your passwords safe, but still ignore it, and continue/authorise. It won't bother you again.

3] Menu: If you right click on an item in the main Menu you will get a choice of:
a] Add to panel (taskbar)
b] Add to desktop
c] Add to favourites
d] Uninstall (very easy to uninstall software, it will ask for your password)

piroska
17-04-2018, 08:02 PM
1] Password: Mint, like Ubuntu, keeps asking for your password for admin actions. This is a real pain in the butt!
)

Er, no. It's a feature. IT's safety. You don't NEED to mess with the system all the time, unlike certain other O/Ss. The few times you may need to alter something, and? Takes a second to enter your proper password.

gary67
17-04-2018, 08:29 PM
But do you really need it just to install updates, yes it is a pain and one of the first things I disable when using any flavour of Linux. You can't even install programs without it bugging you when turned on

Rod J
17-04-2018, 11:37 PM
Er, no. It's a feature. IT's safety. You don't NEED to mess with the system all the time, unlike certain other O/Ss. The few times you may need to alter something, and? Takes a second to enter your proper password.

I agree.

When you first start to use Linux it may seem to be a pain to keep getting prompted for your password (because you are so used to that other OS's lax security) but it quickly becomes automatic and you just don't think about it. Especially if you choose a password that is short, say five characters or so that you can type fast.

dugimodo
18-04-2018, 08:12 AM
You have to strike a balance between security and convenience somewhere. Linux users have got used to it but when MS tried to introduce similar security levels with the first version of UAC it caused such a backlash they backed it off and made it less intrusive by default.
Didn't help of course that was with Vista which had plenty of other issues at release. I put up with it when I use Linux, but it does bug me.

mzee
18-04-2018, 08:29 AM
You have to strike a balance between security and convenience somewhere. Linux users have got used to it but when MS tried to introduce similar security levels with the first version of UAC it caused such a backlash they backed it off and made it less intrusive by default.
Didn't help of course that was with Vista which had plenty of other issues at release. I put up with it when I use Linux, but it does bug me.

I usually disable UAC when setting up Windows, turn it on again when completed setup.