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Kostas
11-06-2017, 03:35 AM
Hello everyone,
I am about to format my pc and having windows 10 64bit. So i have a 300gb HDD and i wanted to create a partition to seperate windows files from personal files, games etc. My question is how much space should i give it? Is 30gb enough since microsoft says needs at least 20gb for the install? Is this even a corect way to organize and seperate windows files?
Thank you in advance for the time spent.

Lawrence
11-06-2017, 07:59 AM
I would go with a 150GB Partition ,even this could be considered to small as people that switch to a 120GB SSD Drive end up wanting more space as things expand

Seem HHD drives are cheap go bigger or the ultimate go SSD 240GB if cost is not a factor and keeping your HHD for non system stuff

Kostas
11-06-2017, 08:26 AM
WOW 150GB!!! wait a second cause i'm really missing something right here. Since files themselves need 20gb for installing what brings the number sky high at 150gb? I know there'll be minor updates, logs etc. but 130 gb more?

Lawrence
11-06-2017, 08:53 AM
All your other software has to be on the same Partition and as you install software they let you know how much space they need to operate with,if you say if are into Photography and run a couple of high end programs you need over 1GB just in installation plus more to be able to work with

If you are into Video conversion this eats space at a great rate an so it goes on with other software

Just looked at drive ,SSD 240GB windows 10 64bit about 20 bits of software and minimal pic's and data on drive as I use another for this and I have used for this 70GB's

Kostas
11-06-2017, 09:32 AM
But my originall plan was to actually have all the programms in an other partition. So i had let's say:
30gb windows( installation and room for updates)
120gb Games and apps
150gb Programms like video,picture editors and other serius stuf
300gb total. Wouldn't this work? Does it require them to be installed in the same partition as windows(for reading)?

Lawrence
11-06-2017, 09:50 AM
Software needs to be run on "C" Drive but there could be some exceptions

Kostas
11-06-2017, 10:05 AM
So should i try it? or do you think it's going to create problems?

Lawrence
11-06-2017, 10:16 AM
Should you try it?, No

The best option is to install without any partition as most have another Drive for this or better still if you could use a SSD 240/250GB as it gives a massive performance jump and the size won't limited you for normal use(have not long done this myself)

dugimodo
11-06-2017, 10:49 AM
I have had windows running on a tablet that only had 32GB of storage. It is a pain in the butt, not even enough space to update from windows 8 to 10 when that happened. It's ok if you install a very minimal amount of software and store ALL your files elsewhere but it requires some effort to maintain and you have to remove unused software to fit on new software. Also you may have to set your swap file elsewhere. I'd suggest 64GB as the minimum practical size for a windows partition and 120GB+ as much easier to live with for most people. A lot of software will not let you choose where it installs and windows stores a lot of things on the C: drive by default so disk usage tends to grow over time.

What you suggest is possible but will likely not be a good experience. Far and away the easiest thing to do is to have a single partition so all free space is available to everything rather than being split among drives. The only advantage to dividing a drive up is it makes it easier to backup & restore windows. Separating installed software doesn't really achieve anything as it still uses up the same amount of space and would still need to be reinstalled if you reinstall windows (except if restoring from an image). Some games are an exception but you can't rely on that, most programs store config and save files on the windows drive and make registry entries etc in windows.

Kostas
11-06-2017, 11:20 AM
Ok thank you very much guys, @Lawrence @dugimodo i think i'll just keep it in one partition untill i could save up for a new drive.

Tony
11-06-2017, 12:11 PM
Sorry to disagree with Lawrence but your application programs do not have to be in the same partition as the operating system. I have my Win10 OS on the C: partition and my application programs (office etc.) on the D: partition. It is just a matter of assigning the correct path when you install a program. There are some progs that don't give you that option, but I can live with that.

I think there are many benefits to separating the OS from the applications, not least being that if you re-install the OS the applications are still there even though you may still have to "re-install" them. I also have a separate partition for all my data files so I can easily back them up/shift them around easily and independently of the OS an applications.

Having said that I would definitely have a C: partition larger than 30GB. My current C: drive is 116GB of which about 80 is used. Windows puts all sorts of miscellaneous stuff on the C: drive that you have little control over. I only have that much spare on the C: drive because I did a major housekeeping exercise and got rid of a lot of the junk. I was down to about 10mb spare and getting all sorts of warnings.

As another poster said, disk drives are so cheap these days there is really no reason not to have large partitions.

wainuitech
11-06-2017, 12:58 PM
Since a partition size is kind of important to allow growth why not split the sizes asked, go 80 -100GB. Nice easy size, still room to grow and add programs.


Is 30gb enough since microsoft says needs at least 20gb for the install What Microsoft aren't saying is you NEED at least 20GB of SPARE space as well.
When Windows upgrades it needs space to move the current installed OS install the New then integrate sections of the old one back in. If you have Less than 20GB Spare you will have problems, it needs room to move.

When doing an upgrade, look at the size of the Windows.old afterwards file is often 18-20+GB in size.

Misty
11-06-2017, 06:33 PM
Unless I am missing something, Kostas, then the best option when you can afford it, is to have your operating system and programs on an SSD drive and the data on your existing hard drive. However, this is the real world, and we have so little appreciation of how difficult it is to live in Greece at the moment. If the EU listened to the IMF then they would forgive some debt, sound economics--and best for all concerned, both borrower and lender - however politics gets in the way.

Given the advice offered, then I think you have to go with what you can afford. Very best wishes from me!

Tony
11-06-2017, 10:06 PM
Unless I am missing something, Kostas, then the best option when you can afford it, is to have your operating system and programs on an SSD drive and the data on your existing hard drive. However, this is the real world, and we have so little appreciation of how difficult it is to live in Greece at the moment. If the EU listened to the IMF then they would forgive some debt, sound economics--and best for all concerned, both borrower and lender - however politics gets in the way.

Given the advice offered, then I think you have to go with what you can afford. Very best wishes from me!

Good advice. I'd still break the SSD into two partitions - OS and applications.

wainuitech
11-06-2017, 10:17 PM
This whole thread has gone off on the wrong tangent. The Op doesn't have a SSD, Whom ever started the SSD portion has confused the thread.

So i have a 300gb HDD and i wanted to create a partition to seperate windows files from personal files, games etc.

mzee
12-06-2017, 11:16 PM
I agree with Tony, I always keep my data on another partition, this way if 'C' packs a sad I still have the latest Data. As I do not do gaming, and do not download videos, I find that 65GB is a good size for Windows 10. This way I can back it up in a few minutes. Some of my more important data is synced with Google Drive. And yes, if you want to save space on C you can install most software on another partition.

Kostas
13-06-2017, 02:33 AM
Since a partition size is kind of important to allow growth why not split the sizes asked, go 80 -100GB. Nice easy size, still room to grow and add programs.

So i might consider this as the best solution since i wanted form the start to break the disk apart to keep things organized, easy to back up and control if something goes wrong.
The only reason i wanted to isolate windows files from all programms was because i had an accident where some software would get saved in the "windows" folder thus i would try to move them but i didn't risk messsing my OS up.(Has happened like twice and had to restore)

Kostas
13-06-2017, 02:40 AM
Unless I am missing something, Kostas, then the best option when you can afford it, is to have your operating system and programs on an SSD drive and the data on your existing hard drive. However, this is the real world, and we have so little appreciation of how difficult it is to live in Greece at the moment. If the EU listened to the IMF then they would forgive some debt, sound economics--and best for all concerned, both borrower and lender - however politics gets in the way.

Given the advice offered, then I think you have to go with what you can afford. Very best wishes from me!

Thank you very much for the kind words. Yes things have been difficult around here if i manage to save up for an SSD i'll buy one. Till then i'll probably divide the 300Gb HDD to two parts, -one being 100gb for windows and programms and -other one for data as @wainuitech originally advised me.

Tony
13-06-2017, 07:27 AM
This whole thread has gone off on the wrong tangent. The Op doesn't have a SSD, Whom ever started the SSD portion has confused the thread.You are right, but the general advice still holds - separate partitions for OS and application progs and general data.

1101
13-06-2017, 11:14 AM
Splitting up a HD is the worst advice , unless they are very tech savvy .

Real world: C: gets full, D: stays near empty . Seen that so many times.

Splitting the HD has few advantages. If the HD dies, data is lost regardless
If you need to reload,with a single partition simply backup data first. Its not that hard. Or wipe the lot & get data from backup.

Splitting the HD often leaves the C: too small , meaning you have to b*gger around managing HD space when C: fills up.

So my opinion, dont split a single HD , especially a relatively small 300M HD

Tony
13-06-2017, 11:26 AM
Splitting up a HD is the worst advice , unless they are very tech savvy .

The OP is actually proposing to create partitions so I assume there is sufficient technical knowledge there.

linw
13-06-2017, 06:02 PM
Still very good advice from 1101. Couldn't agree more with him.

Kostas
15-06-2017, 07:47 PM
Damn it, so many well thought opinions yet I don't know who's right ..... :|

linw
15-06-2017, 09:20 PM
The simplest is to follow what 1101 said. You don't need the complication of managing multiple partitions when there is really no need.

Windows expects progs to be in C: drive. That is the line of least resistance. For backup use something like Macrium Reflect Free to image C: drive to a backup drive. Any problem, just restore that image. Bingo, everything back as it was with no mucking around. You can also extract data files from an image as well if that is what is needed.

IMHO, keep it simple. Years ago we usually split disks up but I never even consider it now.

End of day, you have to consider what you are prepared to manage.

Good luck.

1101
16-06-2017, 10:17 AM
There is no wrong way , either way will work.
Its just easier in the long term to have a single partition (Win10 will actually create a hidden partition , so thats 2 , but you dont get access to the 1st)

Some Laptops come presetup with 5 partitions :just a nightmare to recover/clone . :badpc:
Ive seen a HD setup with a separate partition for every program he installed . A bit over the top :waughh:

CliveM
16-06-2017, 10:43 AM
I would suggest that it is best to follow the advice given by 1101, linw and others. The simplest solution is always better IMHO. Unnecessary complications tend to lead to problems down the track.

Tony
16-06-2017, 11:26 AM
I don't want to confuse the issue even more or extend this thread past its use-by date, but I think the difficulties of multiple partitions are being exaggerated and the advantages downplayed. If you have any technical skill at all dealing with partitions is not a problem. There is the Windows Disk Management tool and any number of third party apps. The advantages of my proposal, i.e. one partition for the OS, one for the applications and one for the data are many.


Keeping the data separate makes it much easier to manage, rather than having it all go into one "documents" folder on the OS partition.
Separate partitions means you can maintain/backup/image stuff in a more granular fashion, i.e have different strategies for the OS, for applications and for data.
If you need to reinstall the OS, you at least still have all the apps available in their separate partition so at least you know what they are, even if you still have to re-install them (which isn't always the case), and also you may well have their settings preserved as well - unless that is all in the registry.
I acknowledge that there are some programs that insist on going on the C: drive, but they are much in the minority these days.

The best of all possible worlds is to have these three categories on separate physical disks, but I acknowledge that is probably a bridge too far for many people.

Having everything in one partition will certainly work, but I am saying that although the initial setup may be a little more complex, the day-to-day maintainability is better with stuff separated.

Kostas
17-06-2017, 12:30 PM
Ok guys I want to thank all of you for all of the attention and the replies I will certainly consider all of them before doing anything.

Tony
17-06-2017, 12:49 PM
Ok guys I want to thank all of you for all of the attention and the replies I will certainly consider all of them before doing anything.Glad to help - and hopefully not overconfuse. :)