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SurferJoe46
21-03-2016, 04:51 PM
I keep getting notices that a certain application is 'way outta date and needs to be brought up to date.

I am getting notices that Flashplayer is out of date and I am allowed a couple of options.

One is to accept the update (which I do almost every time) and the other is to let it just go anyway - which I am doing now that I know that I've downloaded the update at least 40-50 times so far.


firefox-45-0-1.tar.bz.2


adobe-release- x-86_64-1.0-1.noarch.rpm


flash-plugin-11.2.202.577-release.x86-64-6.rpm

I click on the 'update' - something happens and then I'm sent to a page that asks me to somehow open the file I just received.

I have no idea which file I need to open the download. The choices are pretty arcane to me, like abiword - which I don't think this is a readable things and it should be opened and installed - but I have no idea how to go about that.

I tried typing them into the Urxvt terminal and all I get is 'bash'ed.

I'm beginning to understand a file with a .sfs on the end will self-instal, but what about these others?

Help!

wainuitech
21-03-2016, 05:24 PM
Google is your friend :) Well mostly anyway

http://www.tecmint.com/20-practical-examples-of-rpm-commands-in-linux/


Ya gotta remember, Linux is NOT windows, it does things differently.

SurferJoe46
21-03-2016, 05:40 PM
Gack!

I HAD some sort of file area opened and I got to click on one of those updates, and it asked me if I wanted to do - er, some-thing-or-other --- which I did and a small - looked like a dos - window opened for a brief moment and then it went away and I got a SUCCESSFULLY INSTALLED notice.

Wow! That was kewl!

Big question now is - "Where wuz I and what did I do?"

I think I was in a /temp area, but for the life of me I don't know where it is/was/will be again.

It was wonderful --- while it lasted. This learning curve is totally vertical.

SurferJoe46
21-03-2016, 05:44 PM
EDIT:

This is what I mean..... the info is good, but the comprehension is bad.


RPM keeps the information of all the installed packages under /var/lib/rpm database

How do I FIND "/var/lib/rpm database ". Is there some sort of search engine of a repository where those files go - and in my case, get lost - forever?

SurferJoe46
21-03-2016, 06:01 PM
Oooooooh! I found /mnt/home and did it again.

Can anyone tell me if I am OK here - I got this pop up telling me that it was excluded from my recent update :::

*** Installation Started 08/21/2020 19:15 ***
Title: Belarc Advisor Installation
Source: C:\Documents and Settings\Bass Player\Desktop\Programs\IBM CD Files\advisorinstaller.exe | 12-12-2015 | 10:04:58 | 4393888
User Rights: Admin
*** Installation Started 08/21/2020 19:15 ***
Title: Belarc Advisor Installation
Source: C:\Documents and Settings\Bass Player\Desktop\Programs\IBM CD Files\advisorinstaller.exe | 12-12-2015 | 10:04:58 | 4393888
User Rights: Admin

I thought .exe files weren't in Linux.

So what's this stuff --- and notice the date -- 2020 hasn't happened yet.

Kame
21-03-2016, 06:19 PM
SFS, is slackwares packages, possibly compatible with Slacko. Puppy also uses PET files.

RPM is Red Hats, DEB is Debians, etc.

tar.gz is usually a compressed file, possibly compatible with all Linux distributions.

You seem you need to learn more about Slacko/Slackware to know how your distribution works. There would possibly be convertors that could convert such files to what you need to be able to install it into your distribution using its methods to do so.

Cheers,

KK

SurferJoe46
21-03-2016, 06:36 PM
SFS, is slackwares packages, possibly compatible with Slacko. Puppy also uses PET files.

RPM is Red Hats, DEB is Debians, etc.

tar.gz is usually a compressed file, possibly compatible with all Linux distributions.

You seem you need to learn more about Slacko/Slackware to know how your distribution works. There would possibly be convertors that could convert such files to what you need to be able to install it into your distribution using its methods to do so.

Cheers,

KK

Thank-you. Seriously. I really mean it.

"You seem you need to learn more about Slacko/Slackware" is for sure what I need to do. There don't seem to be too many places for a n00b to ask such things.

I'm afraid that I'll kill this installation with a gross mistake that is not recoverable-from and I'm off the internet until I can get it (Puppy) reinstalled again.

Not knowing is the worst part. Will what I do accomplish anything at all? Will I lose internet connectivity? Ya know.... after playing in Windows, this is certainly different.

I DID get to install Open Office, but I want it to be default. I don't know where to go to do that - so Googling is prolly the best. Actually, Googling is not the best answer, since all the answers are for Linux geeks, and I'm not gonna be one for a few years at best.

Not being able to speak the language puts me at a disadvantage. I don't yet understand what I can do with some packages, as I never knew that I could modify (yeah - like THAT'S gonna happen!) a line of code and get it to work for me.

I've got a lot of money riding on the next question:

I bet nobody learned Linux-stuff without someone to hold their hand - right? Everybody was a Linux virgin once - right?

At least this time (my attempting to run a Linux system - Ubuntu I think) I didn't lose all my MP3s and videos. :punk:clap:banana




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fred_fish
21-03-2016, 08:42 PM
You probably haven't done yourself any favours by choosing that distro - it's rather minimal and intentionally stripped down to run on older hardware (which doesn't seem to match your specs...:) ), along with being built to be compatible with Slackware binary packages (NOT rpm and NOT deb) and instructions for other distro's - ESPECIALLY FOR INSTALLING SOFTWARE - will not work.

Slackware is a 'no handholding' type distro, and Puppy is really intended to be used as-is unless you are really into the "nuts and bolts", so unless you want to spend a long time and a lot of frustration getting up to speed with Slackware packaging conventions, AND the particular quirks and caveats of shoehorning such packages into Puppy (and presumably doing manual dependency resolution, as is the Slackware way), I think you would be MUCH better off picking another distro.

Any of the large distros provide really easy pre-packaged software installation from repo's that house compatible packages for the release you are running.

Pick one you like and use the software provided, at least until you get a grip on how things work, and what is involved when going 'off-piste'.

The single biggest problem people coming from Windows run into is trying to download and install random packages and source code from "wherever" that are not compatible or require convoluted and precise build processes.

I like the Debian ecosystem, so would recommend Debian Stable (currently Jessie) if you want free (as in speech) - there are also the derivatives (Ubuntu / Mint / SolydX and many more) that make default choices / changes to the parent to suit themselves and their target users (maybe more "Windows user friendly").

It's probably best to pick something that has good documentation and help resources / forums and a good number of active users - it can be frustrating when using a niche distro and having issues that don't occur in the parent distro and there are very few places/people to help.

SurferJoe46
22-03-2016, 02:34 AM
Thanks, Fred.

My first intention was to get Mint, but they kept saying the servers had been hacked and until they were rendered OK, they were shutting them down. So I jumped to Puppy/Slacko, and all this experience has been interesting, but frustrating at the same time.

Being so, I DID get OpenOffice installed (back patting, please!) so I know I could do other things given the time to stumble, fumble and create numerous bilabial fricatives. (that should get through the filters).

Time is the enemy here, so I'll try to Google "Mint" again and see if the servers are now clear of malware.

Thanks for the motivation.

SurferJoe46
22-03-2016, 02:55 AM
Is Zorin a decent distro? I've got a recent copy of that for 32 & 64, needing 64 for myself.

fred_fish
22-03-2016, 07:38 AM
Is Zorin a decent distro? I've got a recent copy of that for 32 & 64, needing 64 for myself.

It's a distro... :)
I don't have any experience with it, but it is an Ubuntu derivative that claims to be more familiar for Windows users.
Again, do some searches for the kinds of questions you have been running into and see how much helpful, Zorin specific, info you can find - in general terms, Ubuntu/Mint/Debian advice will be mostly applicable, but for specific things like Software installation or GUI specific questions, you will need Zorin info.

Mint's forum, and then website, were compromised a few weeks ago, and for one day the download links for one ISO were redirected to an altered copy.
The site was taken down while this was fixed and is now back up and operating normally - no need to still be concerned, lots of people have been scrutinising their setup closely.