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AppleFan
18-08-2015, 06:28 PM
Hey i have got three windows server 2012 which one is primary domain , secondary and third is read only domain.

Now i have a question which i googled and did look on youtube where i didn't find much help .

So i have to create a subnet in within a domain , i have got to the part on creating subnet but i don't know how should i put in .


It is asking to put prefix so that i don't know what i should put in .


First server ip is 192.168.1.10
Second server ip is 192.168.1.20
Third is 192.168.1.30

Thanks

nmercer
18-08-2015, 06:42 PM
What are you trying to achieve?

Domains and Subnets are completely different. Regardless of whether that is a DNS domain or a Windows domain

If you are trying to use all those ip address ranges and keep them separate you will need a subnet mask.

AppleFan
18-08-2015, 06:47 PM
Hey my question is within a domain create a new subnet , so i want to know what shall the prefix be since i don't know much about it .

Thanks

AppleFan
18-08-2015, 06:49 PM
6696


See screenshot

nmercer
18-08-2015, 07:01 PM
Why do you need 3 subnets?

Kame
18-08-2015, 08:19 PM
Windows is so confusing.

Anyways, the prefix is what I have known as the netmask length and you calculate it. Converting to binary, logical AND, etc

Well, thats enough information for you to find out what to do.

Cheers,

KK

Alex B
18-08-2015, 08:36 PM
Why do you need 3 subnets?

To pass his windows server course.

http://www.subnet-calculator.com/

AppleFan
18-08-2015, 10:03 PM
Hey thanks for reply

chiefnz
22-08-2015, 10:52 AM
You may be confusing the concepts of subnet and sub-domain

subnet - simply put a "sudivided network" within an IP range.

So for example... let say your network is 192.168.1.0/24 - this is "standard" class C address range and only has 1 available subnet which allows 254 hosts.
so IP range - 192.168.1.0/24
network mask 255.255.255.0
192.168.1.0 = indicates the network subnet i.e. the start of a network
192.168.1.255 = is the broadcast address


If we take 192.168.1.0/25 - still a "class C" address but because of the /25 it has 2 avaiable subnets which have 126 host addresses available each.

So here the networks would be;

1st subnet
192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.125
subnet 255.255.255.128

2nd subnet 192.168.1.127 - 192.168.1.254
255.255.255.128

chiefnz
22-08-2015, 11:10 AM
Sorry ran out of time whilst editing.... my post in full...

You may be confusing the concepts of subnet and sub-domain

subnet - simply put a "sudivided network" within an IP range.

So for example... let's say your network is 192.168.1.0/24 - this is "standard" class C address range and only has 1 available subnet which allows 254 hosts.
so IP range - 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254
network mask 255.255.255.0
192.168.1.0 = indicates the network subnet i.e. the start of a network
192.168.1.255 = is the broadcast address of the network

If we take 192.168.1.0/25 - still a "class C" address but because of the /25 it has 2 available subnets which have 126 host addresses available each.

So here the networks would be;

1st subnet
192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.125
subnet 255.255.255.128
192.168.1.0 - indicates the network subnet
192.168.1.126 - broadcast address

2nd subnet 192.168.1.128 - 192.168.1.254
255.255.255.128
192.168.1.127 - indicates the network subnet
192.168.1.255 - indicates the broadcast address

Domains also have a hierachical structure;

Forest----->domain (you can multiple domains in a forest)
|
|------>domains can have subdomains within them. Such as this...

top level domain = pcworld.co.nz
subdomain = pressf1.pcworld.co.nz etc

So coming to your question about setting up subnets within a domain... If I understand correctly you're referring to having each of your DC's on a "different" network?

To achieve this you setup your subnets on your network - i.e. configure routers and switches with the various networks, VLANS (if applicable) etc.
Then on your primary DC you need to add these configs to DNS/DHCP etc and also configure statics routes on your network interface.

If you're using replication the DNS/DHCP settings will filter through to the other DC's if your secondary is a backup to your primary then the DNS/DHCP configs should be the same.

Note the network interfaces will have different configurations in terms of IP address and each DC should have a static route added for the other 2 networks. You shouldn't need to add the default route for that network as it willalready have been added when you configured the network interface at the start.

So you can have each of your servers on 3 different subnets but still have them able to "communicate" with each other via routing configs etc.

Caveat I'm no expert but this is how I've done it at home and have not had any issue. Though to be fair it wasn't exactly an advanced config I was going for.

Good luck

linw
22-08-2015, 04:11 PM
Do you sit the exams for a fee, chief?

AppleFan
22-08-2015, 07:40 PM
Sorry ran out of time whilst editing.... my post in full...

You may be confusing the concepts of subnet and sub-domain

subnet - simply put a "sudivided network" within an IP range.

So for example... let's say your network is 192.168.1.0/24 - this is "standard" class C address range and only has 1 available subnet which allows 254 hosts.
so IP range - 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254
network mask 255.255.255.0
192.168.1.0 = indicates the network subnet i.e. the start of a network
192.168.1.255 = is the broadcast address of the network

If we take 192.168.1.0/25 - still a "class C" address but because of the /25 it has 2 available subnets which have 126 host addresses available each.

So here the networks would be;

1st subnet
192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.125
subnet 255.255.255.128
192.168.1.0 - indicates the network subnet
192.168.1.126 - broadcast address

2nd subnet 192.168.1.128 - 192.168.1.254
255.255.255.128
192.168.1.127 - indicates the network subnet
192.168.1.255 - indicates the broadcast address

Domains also have a hierachical structure;

Forest----->domain (you can multiple domains in a forest)
|
|------>domains can have subdomains within them. Such as this...

top level domain = pcworld.co.nz
subdomain = pressf1.pcworld.co.nz etc

So coming to your question about setting up subnets within a domain... If I understand correctly you're referring to having each of your DC's on a "different" network?

To achieve this you setup your subnets on your network - i.e. configure routers and switches with the various networks, VLANS (if applicable) etc.
Then on your primary DC you need to add these configs to DNS/DHCP etc and also configure statics routes on your network interface.

If you're using replication the DNS/DHCP settings will filter through to the other DC's if your secondary is a backup to your primary then the DNS/DHCP configs should be the same.

Note the network interfaces will have different configurations in terms of IP address and each DC should have a static route added for the other 2 networks. You shouldn't need to add the default route for that network as it willalready have been added when you configured the network interface at the start.

So you can have each of your servers on 3 different subnets but still have them able to "communicate" with each other via routing configs etc.

Caveat I'm no expert but this is how I've done it at home and have not had any issue. Though to be fair it wasn't exactly an advanced config I was going for.

Good luck



Hey chiefnz thanks so much for help , much appreciated . I do understand it now .
So thanks once again .

chiefnz
24-08-2015, 04:18 PM
Do you sit the exams for a fee, chief?

Uuummm generally, all vendor exams are at a cost yes.

If the vendor does mandate a compulsory course (like VMware does) some providers such as Auldhouse computing will include a single "shot" at the exam as part of the course fees... and yes you guessed it these courses are like $5K and up possibly more nowadays.

Microsft doesn't mandate sitting a compulsory course for it's certifications (yet) though one of the biggest differences is that "most" MS certifications require more than one exam... the only caveat here is the MS Certified Professional accreditation which you automatically gain after successfully completing any applicable MS technology exam. This is kind of neat because it gives you some sense of accomplishment as you go from exam to exam the other thing is MS certifications don't really expire but the technology platform the certification is for can become obsolete - so you do get at least 5-7 years "use" out of your certification.