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Columbuslee
08-01-2015, 12:10 AM
I am planning on building a new computer using parts from my old computer. I am planning on using the hard drive, DVD, memory, graphics card and case (the * items are the parts I want to reuse).
Old Computer:
*Hard Drive - SEAGATE 500GB SATA NCQ 16MB
*DVD - IPSG SAMSUNG 22X DVDRW SATA
*Memory - CORSAIR 12GB 3X4 D3 1333 DIMM
*Case - ANTEC ONE HUNDRED ATX CASE
*Graphics Card - EVGA GTS450 1GB DDM FPB PCIE
CPU - AMD PHENOM II X6 1090T BE AM3
Motherboard - ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO/U3 AM3 ATX

For the new computer I am planning to add the below listed items:
CPU
AMD FX-8320 Vishera 8-Core 3.5GHz (4.0GHz Turbo) Socket AM3+ 125W Desktop Processor FD8320FRHKBOX
Motherboard
Gigabyte ATX Socket AM3+ AMD 970 Chipset 2000MHz DDR3 SATA III 6Gbps Ready AMD 9 Series FX Motherboards GA-970A-D3P


CPU: AMD AM3+ FX processors; AMD AM3 Phenom II processor/ AMD Athlon II processor
Memory: 4x1.5V DDR3 DIMM sockets supporting up to 32 GB of system memory; DDR3 2000(O.C)/1866/1333/1066 MHz
LAN: Realtek GbE LAN chip (10/100/1000 Mbit)
Expansion Slots: 1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x16 (PCIEX16); 1 x PCI Express x16 slot, running at x4 (PCIEX4);3 x PCI Express x1 slots; 2 x PCI slots
Storage Interface: 6 x SATA 6Gb/s connectors supporting up to 6 SATA 6Gb/s devices; Support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, and JBOD
USB: Up to 14 USB 2.0/1.1 ports; 4 USB 3.0/2.0 ports
SSD
Crucial MX100 Series 128GB SATA III 6Gb/s 2.5" Internal Solid State Drive CT128MX100SSD1
CPU FAN
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO - CPU Cooler with 120mm Fan (RR-212-20PK-R2)

I think everything will fit in the old ATX case.

Will it be much of a problem to install an SSD along with my old hard drive? Will I have to purchase a new Windows 7 program. Can I keep all the stuff on the old hard drive and have the operating system on the SSD?

When I look at the picture of the motherboard it looks like there are plastic ridges for the CPU fan. It looks like the plastic ridges are screwed to the motherboard. If that is the case I believe all I have to do would be to remove the plastic ridges and use the standoff system that came with the new CPU Fan. Does that seem correct?

Have I left anything out?

Does my plan seem feasible? I no longer live near a Microcenter (a six hour drive to Denver is the closest) and I have no idea who I should purchase the parts I need. Any ideas?

Thanks for all the great work all of you do!!!! I would be lost without your assistance.

pctek
08-01-2015, 07:25 AM
Will it be much of a problem to install an SSD along with my old hard drive? Will I have to purchase a new Windows 7 program. Can I keep all the stuff on the old hard drive and have the operating system on the SSD?

When I look at the picture of the motherboard it looks like there are plastic ridges for the CPU fan. It looks like the plastic ridges are screwed to the motherboard. If that is the case I believe all I have to do would be to remove the plastic ridges and use the standoff system that came with the new CPU Fan. Does that seem correct?


No problem using the SSD. I would clone the old drive onto the new one and then just remove the data off it. Save having to do a complete reinstall.
And then, remove the O/S off the old drive, leaving the data....

Technically you are supposed to buy Windows again, however it would work with the old one.

You are correct about the CPU fan system....remove the original, replacing with your new one.

dugimodo
08-01-2015, 07:38 AM
OEM windows 7 is not legally transferable and should really be sold with your old hardware however you can often get it to work but it may require a phone call to MS to convince them it's a repair rather than an upgrade. Retail windows 7 can be legally transferred as long as it is removed from the old machine so it depends which you have. Cloning a drive for a new motherboard and CPU may or may not work depending how similar the hardware is and would require windows to be reactivated. I think it would be better all round to start fresh and install windows on the SSD from scratch.

This site and most of the users is based in New Zealand so we can't help you with local suppliers but I imagine someone like newegg would ship to your location.
Your plan looks perfectly workable, if you want feedback on your parts choices it'd be helpful to know what you're trying to achieve and/or what the PC is used for.

Columbuslee
08-01-2015, 11:11 AM
Thanks for all your insight!!

Right now I use that computer to play WoW at 1080p. It really looks great, with a lot of detail I hadn't seen before. I will also be using Dragon 13 and I want to do some photo editing. I also use Hauppage WinTV-850 to turn my computer into a DVR.

My old CPU would have cost about the same as the new one but the socket on my old motherboard can't use newer CPU's. Upgrading both the CPU and the Motherboard seems to give me the most bang for the buck.

My old hard drive has more than 128GB. Can I just take the old OS off the old hard drive and move it to the SSD?

Since my old hardware does not work but the hard drive does will that help will being able to just install Windows 7 on the new computer? Once I get the SSD to be the boot drive how do I make all the stuff on the old hard drive available in the easiest way?

I realize you are in New Zealand but I have been purchasing all my major computer stuff from Microcenter for over 20 years and having to now do it on line is not something I am looking forward to. All of you are to me my lifeline to keep me from making too many dumb mistakes.

dugimodo
08-01-2015, 02:41 PM
TL;DR - go for an i5 or keep what you have.

I'm a WoW player myself and what many who don't play fail to understand is just how demanding that game can be. I have an i7 3770 and a GTX980 and even so in a 40 man RAID the FPS can drop into the mid 20's briefly when there's a lot going on (despite being well over 100fps while solo questing).

For gaming I'd personally go for an intel i5 and suitable motherboard. I recommend having a read through this article http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-overclock,3106.html for more understanding of why. In fact that article rates the 8320 and your current CPU as near enough the same in gaming performance making the upgrade largely pointless.

The point of the tiers on the hierarchy chart on page 5 is that CPU's grouped within a tier will game close enough in performance in most games that you won't see a difference. You Phenom is in the highest tier that AMD reaches, while their are some games that do benefit from the extra cores of the 8320 they are few and far between and intel are significantly better on an IPC per core basis.

Columbuslee
09-01-2015, 09:26 PM
I am confused about my old CPU being very close to the CPU's I am interested in. Yesterday I switched to the AMD FX-8350. When I looked at which CPU to choose I used this website: http://www.passmark.com/index.html

When I compare the AMD FX-8350, Intel Core i7 3770, AMD FX-8320 and my old CPU AMD Phenom II x6 using their CPU Marks: the FX-8350 is 9004, the i7 is at 9384, the FX-8320 is at 8074 while the Phenom II is 5706.

Looking at the Hierarchy Chart the FX-8350 and FX-8320 are just one level below the top level on the chart. With the FX-8350 @ $170 and the i7 @ $305.

It's AMD all the way.

Am I correct?

For the Alliance!!

dugimodo
10-01-2015, 09:00 AM
AMD is often the best choice if you have a strict budget, but for games if you can afford intel they are just better. The hierarchy chart is just about gaming performance, passmark do a lot of other tests so it's more about overall performance.
For anything that uses four cores or less (which is almost all current games) intel dominates. Check the single threaded passmark charts and you'll see it's quite different, AMD only gain ground for multithreaded because of a higher core count. In some tests they do beat intel but for most of us they are things we never do and don't translate to the real world. People who need that kind of power tend to spend huge amounts of money on high end platforms with 8 core intel chips that aren't even in this discussion due to crazy prices.

The point I'm making for your CPU is that in games you are not likely to notice much of an improvement no matter what AMD CPU you upgrade to. Sure for other things you might but even then not so much, you have one of the fastest phenoms AMD make and they haven't improved all that much since. I know AMD has a lot of loyal supporters and I used to be one of them but if you are serious about gaming you buy intel. If you don't mind less performance and more heat/power consumption and want to stick with AMD then that's cool too. At the end of the day they both game good enough to do the job.

AMD FX 8350 vs intel i5 4460
http://www.cpu-world.com/Compare/368/AMD_FX-Series_FX-8350_vs_Intel_Core_i5_i5-4460.html
In single-threaded programs, our estimates show that the processor is about 83% faster.
It's your call and the FX 8350 is probably good enough that you will never have an issue with it, but from a purely gaming perspective intel is better.


Looking at the Hierarchy Chart the FX-8350 and FX-8320 are just one level below the top level on the chart
Yep, at the level of current i3s and below every current i5. There has been a few people asking that the chart be broken into another tier to better show the high end but Tom's group them that way because for most mainstream games there is no gain to be had once you exceed 4 threads and in many cases the i7's actually do worse than the i5's. This is the same reason AMD do poorly, they have higher core counts but much lower per core performance.