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learning
21-07-2014, 02:58 PM
I moved in a house that is 2 story and my DSL modem wifi router is upstairs.

I cant seem to get good wifi coverage downstairs and its very flaky.

Can someone suggest a good wirless extender?

Thanks

1101
21-07-2014, 03:23 PM
I moved in a house that is 2 story and my DSL modem wifi router is upstairs.

I cant seem to get good wifi coverage downstairs and its very flaky.

Can someone suggest a good wirless extender?

Thanks

WIFI extenders can be really flakey as well. Ive tried them on a number on sites, they are really hit or miss: sometime work well, often dont
work at all. I dont think they will help here.
Sometimes also have to match the modem/router to the extender.

The best option is a homeplug unit, it sends the network through the mains cable. you plug one end into the mains power next to the modem, other end into the mains
upstairs. Cost is $150 - $250 ish

The Netcom homeplug kits : I'm had 3 out of 6 pairs/installs fail. Anyone tried other brands ?

linw
21-07-2014, 05:50 PM
Agree, getting a good signal up or down stairs is a problem.

Homeplug sets are one way. The other foolproof way is to see if you can run an ethernet cable downstairs with a wireless router on the far end. That is how I fixed my similar problem.

Speedy Gonzales
21-07-2014, 06:30 PM
Or get a better wireless modem / one that's got better coverage

wainuitech
21-07-2014, 07:17 PM
Linw's suggestion with the Ethernet cable is the safest way.

You dont need an actual Router though, just a Wireless Access point. We have one in the lounge and Workshop connected to the Router in the Office. These ones here:http://www.netgear.co.nz/service-providers/products/business/wireless/soho-wireless/wn604.aspx They are about $70 give or take.

Agent_24
22-07-2014, 08:34 PM
Homeplugs are great if you want a ton of noise on your power line, I would run an Ethernet cable.

BBCmicro
24-07-2014, 11:36 AM
Our son bought a wifi extender plug and thought it was useless. (The device was a bit like a night-light. You plug into a power point halfway between the two locations. No cables.)

So he bought an access point [as Wainui recommends] and ran a Cat5 cable to it (and power) and all was well.

Our daughter took over the wifi extender plug and found it worked quite well in her (more difficult) situation.

The difference between the two cases is that our son did not use it properly (even though he works in IT!) His main access point was basically at floor level as was the extender plug in an adjacent room - it was a really scungy path between everything

Whereas our daughter connected the plug to a power cord and suspended it high up with a reasonable sight-line to the access point.

(Correct me if I am wrong, but I understand that a wifi repeater - one that takes in wifi (RF) and spits out wifi (RF) - will reduce the bandwidth by x4. The device stores the packet and waits for the airways to clear before re-transmitting it. If both ends are bathed in the same RF (even if only at interference level) then everything is waiting for everything else and throughput drops by 4x. Am I right?)

Agent_24
24-07-2014, 12:13 PM
I have not used a repeater but I would assume it works on a different channel to avoid that problem

Renegade
24-07-2014, 12:13 PM
Anyone used one of these? http://www.ubnt.com/unifi/unifi-ap/
A place I was at a couple of weeks ago had one, it had a very strong signal throughout their 2-level building. Looks like it's Powered over Ethernet.

1101
24-07-2014, 01:41 PM
Our son bought a wifi extender plug and thought it was useless. (The device was a bit like a night-light. You plug into a power point halfway between the two locations. No cables.)


That device is actually a repeater. I have installed a few, sometimes work, sometimes dont.

There can be plenty of noise on mains power, a tiny bit more from a homeplug unit wont cause any meltdowns .

Agent_24
24-07-2014, 08:05 PM
There can be plenty of noise on mains power, a tiny bit more from a homeplug unit wont cause any meltdowns .

Tiny? The facts speak for themselves: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wvtBhilvz4

1101
25-07-2014, 10:05 AM
Tiny? The facts speak for themselves: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wvtBhilvz4

heres the link he mentioned in the vid
http://www.ukqrm.org.uk/
.. so lets also ban plasma TV's,fluro lighting, power tools, anything with coils that that switches on and off, solar power inverters, electric fences
and the list goes on and on.
My cellphone spits out a fair bit of noise (noise heard on computor powered speakers), lets ban those as well

I havnt seen that many Ham radio operators in the homes that use these devices.
So simple, if youre a HAM radio operator, dont use them. For 99.99% of us, they are just fine & dandy.

Oh , and please dont quote links 4 years old using older tech Powerline adapters.
Belkin, what do you expect :-)

Sit a AM radio on top of a PC & see what happens. Cant hear the station with all the noise.
What does that prove, nothing of interest

learning
02-08-2014, 06:34 PM
Thank you all for the tips. I was not aware of the homeplug unit until saw it here.

I currently have a Netgear DGND 3300v2 wireless DSL router.
For now I will give a wireless extender a shot and decided to try Netgear ExtenderEX6100 http://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/wifi-range-extenders/EX6100.aspx

Typically for better coverage should wireless extenders be upstairs or downstairs ?
I can easily move my router downstairs or leave it upstairs.

wainuitech
02-08-2014, 08:13 PM
Doesn't really matter if the extender is upstairs or down, as long as the overlap of the extender range is within the range of the Router.

I've installed several of those Netgear extenders ( different model) and they have all worked fine. Sometimes depending on the layout of the house, the insulation in walls, floors etc, you have to move the extender about to get the best result.

Just a Hint -- when you plug in the extenders to a power socket for the first time, attach a laptop to the Ethernet port and set it up manually (its very easy as the wizard walks you through) found the Auto setup doesn't work to well in most cases.

berryb
02-08-2014, 09:30 PM
I like Wainuitech have installed several extenders and as long as within wireless range have worked fine. Also agree that manual config is often best.

Agent_24
02-08-2014, 09:30 PM
found the Auto setup doesn't work to well in most cases.

Do they ever?

berryb
02-08-2014, 09:34 PM
Yes but not always the way you want them to work. The last D-Link extender I installed worked via the auto setup but I wanted to configure the SSID and password to something different.

But have found a lot that don't auto setup.

Speedy Gonzales
02-08-2014, 09:38 PM
Its like the useless network wizard that was in XP. Why it was there in the 1st place, I have no idea. It didnt do anything. What took people ages to figure out, could have been done, in less than a minute if you did it manually

Agent_24
02-08-2014, 09:40 PM
Sorry, should have added /sarcasm to my post... ;)

I hate autosetup features as they almost always get everything wrong or don't even work at all.

Surprisingly though I have used the XP network wizard many times with success.

Speedy Gonzales
02-08-2014, 09:42 PM
You're probably 1 out of a few billion then where it did work

linw
03-08-2014, 10:48 AM
"You're probably 1 out of a few billion ". That's what his mother says!! As long as he doesn't believe it:)

wainuitech
03-08-2014, 11:22 AM
Its like the useless network wizard that was in XP. Why it was there in the 1st place, I have no idea. It didnt do anything. What took people ages to figure out, could have been done, in less than a minute if you did it manually The wizard is really easy to use, from memory ( so some steps my be missing ) You connect a Ethernet cable directly via a Laptop, PC, making sure the PC is NOT connected to the LAN ( this is important as it does change some options) the wizard often opens on its own when detected, or open your web browswer, you scan for any wireless signals, any in range will be detected, you select yours. You can either change the name of the extender to something else or use its default which will put a ext at the end Eg; yournetwork_EXT.

At this point you can either use the same password ( advisable) or give it another. The reason I set up the same password is if you have a mobile device that has been connected to the original Wireless & extension, if you move from one stronger signal to another the connection can change to the stronger signal, and you would never know.

Theres a couple of other options atfer setting the pasword, just read what you do or dont want to do.

Once its synced ( can take a minute or two), unplug the laptop ( settiing up) scan for any wireless connections and you'll see a new one, Eg> yournetwork & yournetwork_EXT, connect to it using your password, and thats it, all done. :)

If the range is not to good where the extender is, then move it, ( unplug, then plug in again, no need to resetup) keeping in mind the further away from the router the extender is, the weaker that critical connection strength of the signal between the router/Extender crossover will be.

Thats why I normally set up Access points Via ethernet -- you can run a cable ( up to 100Mtrs) from the router plug a Access point into that.

BTW: The extender can be connected as a acess point to a ethernet cable if needed, just sets up differently.

Speedy Gonzales
03-08-2014, 11:32 AM
Thankfully i didnt have to do all / any of that. Only time I used an ethernet cable was when I updated the fw on the modem. To reconfigure it. I've never used extenders myself. At the mo everything connects fine to the modem wirelessly

Agent_24
03-08-2014, 11:46 AM
"You're probably 1 out of a few billion ". That's what his mother says!! As long as he doesn't believe it:)

We are all one out of a few billion... Or maybe two, if you're Siamese twins...

berryb
03-08-2014, 12:38 PM
The wizard is really easy to use, from memory ( so some steps my be missing ) You connect a Ethernet cable directly via a Laptop, PC, making sure the PC is NOT connected to the LAN ( this is important as it does change some options) the wizard often opens on its own when detected, or open your web browswer, you scan for any wireless signals, any in range will be detected, you select yours. You can either change the name of the extender to something else or use its default which will put a ext at the end Eg; yournetwork_EXT.

Do you use the same SSID as the current or make it different? If you keep it the same as long as the 2 devices are on different channels I find there is no need to change any devices with any wireless connection.

wainuitech
03-08-2014, 02:44 PM
Do you use the same SSID as the current or make it different? If you keep it the same as long as the 2 devices are on different channels I find there is no need to change any devices with any wireless connection. "Usually" I would use the same SSID as per the original.

One funny event happened once, one customer wanted his SSID at his house named "Home" that way he could determine which was his home and which was his work network.

Few months later another customer wanted the same thing, when scanning for networks the laptop picked up home_ext -- it was his neighbors that I had installed previously. Their previous Router, also having the SSID of Home was to weak to go outside the hall let alone the house.

BBCmicro
03-08-2014, 06:13 PM
it was his neighbors that I had installed previously...

:) Trying to be clever I named my SSID virus.exe. A bit later we had a group of young people staying. I had given them the password and one of them said "I presume it's virus.exe" and connected. He didn't blink an eyelid or show the slightest bit of amusement - behaved as if everyone names their access point that way...

After the earlier discussion on wifi extenders I got to thinking what I would do if I needed to. I decided that the most scientific solution would be to use an access point/wifi router/repeater with a detachable antenna. And replace the antenna with one that had some gain eg a yagi with about 12 dBi gain. This would give 10 dB increase over the typical 2 dBi that access points use. Most importantly, the 10 dB would apply to both transmit and receive. So instead of the normal 100mW of transmit power (or 50mW, if it's a typical repeater ie 17 dBW), it would have 1 W effectively both transmit and receive.

And if I could use a separate antenna at the client end, I would get a total of 20 dB both ways. That's 10 watts equivalent, both ways

1101
04-08-2014, 11:04 AM
:) ........ Most importantly, the 10 dB would apply to both transmit and receive. So instead of the normal 100mW of transmit power (or 50mW, if it's a typical repeater ie 17 dBW), it would have 1 W effectively both transmit and receive.

And if I could use a separate antenna at the client end, I would get a total of 20 dB both ways. That's 10 watts equivalent, both ways

Just so there's no confusion, higher db antenna's dont give any more power. Zero, zilch nada . (I know you said equivalent) :)
All they do is focus the transmission into a narrower (more focused) beam.
That could make things worse if trying to go between floors .

But your example does show why better antenna's are more effective than (legal) signal boosters .

dugimodo
04-08-2014, 03:46 PM
Yagis work well in a point to point link but are hopeless in a normal multi-directional wi-fi setup. They are very directional. You'd get a great link between the extender and the router but they'd both have hopeless coverage unless they had seperate aerials for local wi-fi usage as well as the yagi for the link.