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Tony
19-06-2014, 10:40 AM
I'm thinking of installing an SSD as my bootable device and transferring Windows to it. Are there any issues of motherboard support or anything else I should be thinking about?

Speedy Gonzales
19-06-2014, 10:59 AM
Guess it depends on what you use to transfer windows across to the SSD. Does the program, come with the SSD?

Tony
19-06-2014, 03:08 PM
Guess it depends on what you use to transfer windows across to the SSD. Does the program, come with the SSD?I haven't bought anything yet. I'm planning to do a clean Windows install so I'll be re-installing everything anyway. I'm more concerned about any hardware-related possible problems.

Speedy Gonzales
19-06-2014, 03:26 PM
Dont think so. As long as there's drivers for whatever, is in the case. For the version of windows you're installing. . Like the netbook here, I cant install windows 8 on it. Because, there are no Nvidia chipset drivers for it.

No chipset drivers (Win7 chipset drivers didn't work either), it couldn't / wouldn't shut down properly. It shut something down (the screen did go black, but it didnt shut the whole netbook down). I could still hear the fan.

And it kept hanging, every time I restarted it. And when I updated it, it hung every time I restarted. So, I put Win7 on it again

dugimodo
19-06-2014, 03:57 PM
Ideally you want whatever the latest SATA port is (SATA III = 6Gbps yeah?) but it's not a huge deal if you have the previous one, you just miss out on a little speed you probably won't notice. Some of them have cloning software available on their websites or included on a disk or there are other options if not. A good opportunity to start over though if your windows is a bit old and could use a refresh.

I suppose you'd want to check if your case has a physical mount for a 2.5" drive or if you need a 3.5" adapter as well - some drives come with them many don't.
As far as Speedies software issues, as long as you are using the same version of windows as you are now that shouldn't happen. I think you'd want to be using 7 0r 8 for best SSD support as well but even under XP you can run utilities to do the Trim functions etc if windows isn't doing it.

Tony
19-06-2014, 05:55 PM
It will be Win7. I'm not sure what level my SATA ports are (how do I check?). I won't have any other physical mounting problems. I made the original post be cause I seemed to remember when SSDs first came out there was some question as to whether all motherboards would support them, but I could be wrong.

Speedy Gonzales
19-06-2014, 06:19 PM
If you know what the model of the mobo / system is do a search in Google for its specs

linw
19-06-2014, 09:59 PM
What ports you have are not an issue. The drivers are dated 2006 on my SSD drive!

But I did find that I got a much better speed by changing from IDE to AHCI. The speed test I used is AS SSD.

linw
19-06-2014, 11:53 PM
To add a clarification, a SSD will work on any mobo with a SATA socket but it won't attain its highest speed unless attached to a 6GB/s port. I had a fast SATA port and AHCI allowed the SSD to achieve its full speed potential.

Tony
20-06-2014, 07:34 AM
Thanks everyone. All I have to do now is find a suitable device.

dugimodo
20-06-2014, 08:58 AM
Samsung Evo gets my vote, or I see a crucial MX100 on special all over the place for $344 for 512Gb - very tempting.

Tony
20-06-2014, 09:45 AM
Yes, I've seen a review of the Samsung which gave it high praise. I'm not sure I need 512GB - I'm only planning to have a single partition, solely for the Windows installation, and leave my other disks for everything else. 256GB or even less should be adequate for that. My current Windows partition is 100GB of and is about 50% full.

tweak'e
20-06-2014, 10:57 AM
To add a clarification, a SSD will work on any mobo with a SATA socket but it won't attain its highest speed unless attached to a 6GB/s port. I had a fast SATA port and AHCI allowed the SSD to achieve its full speed potential.

not quite that easy.
some mobo's have the highest speed sata on a secondary chip. in some case they can run slower than the main sata ports because of bottleneck between the secondary chip and the chipset. ie the connection between the two isn't fast enough to cater for multiple devices. pays to check out the reviews of that mobo and see if theres any issues.

linw
20-06-2014, 11:19 AM
Yes, I've seen a review of the Samsung which gave it high praise. I'm not sure I need 512GB - I'm only planning to have a single partition, solely for the Windows installation, and leave my other disks for everything else. 256GB or even less should be adequate for that. My current Windows partition is 100GB of and is about 50% full.

I got the 256GB Samsung EVO but, in spite of putting everything I usefully could onto it, I am only using 80GB. So I could really have got away with 128GB.

Tony
20-06-2014, 11:22 AM
not quite that easy.
some mobo's have the highest speed sata on a secondary chip. in some case they can run slower than the main sata ports because of bottleneck between the secondary chip and the chipset. ie the connection between the two isn't fast enough to cater for multiple devices. pays to check out the reviews of that mobo and see if theres any issues.My mobo is an ASUS M3A-H/HDMI and its documentation says it has 6 SATA 3.0 sockets. How do I tell whether what you say is the case here?

tweak'e
20-06-2014, 12:07 PM
My mobo is an ASUS M3A-H/HDMI and its documentation says it has 6 SATA 3.0 sockets. How do I tell whether what you say is the case here?
just had a quick look. theres only one set (6) of sata ports so theres no choice as what to use. that makes things easy.

i went with intel SSD. reliability more important to me than speed.
120gig and its not even half full. i also have 500gig and other drives as bulk storage.

Speedy Gonzales
20-06-2014, 12:25 PM
People were having probs with the Intel 530, if they were using (so Intel thinks) a displayport cable / connection, and pin 20 was missing on the cable. It kept on disappearing on reboot.

But I've read that even if you put a SATA 3 ssd on a SATA 2 port it'll still be fast enough (but not as fast as it should be).

Tony
20-06-2014, 12:30 PM
But I've read that even if you put a SATA 3 ssd on a SATA 2 port it'll still be fast enough (but not as fast as it should be).Yes, I've seen that written somewhere as well.

I just tried changing my BIOS settings from IDE to AHCI and Windows refused to load. I got a quick flash of a blue screen and then it rebooted. I've read a couple of things about problems like this but nothing definitive yet.

Speedy Gonzales
20-06-2014, 12:43 PM
You can't change from IDE to AHCI after windows is installed. It has to be on AHCI before you install windows. If you want to use AHCI. Otherwise, you'll get a 0x0000007b stop error. Which means it cant find the hdd to boot from

But if you use XP the SATA drivers have to be slipstreamed on the CD, if you want to use AHCI. Since XP doesnt have any SATA drivers on the CD. Otherwise it'll crash with the same stop error. Before you even install windows

Tony
20-06-2014, 12:49 PM
You can't change from IDE to AHCI after windows is installed. It has to be on AHCI before you install windows. If you want to use AHCI. Otherwise, you'll get a 0x0000007b stop error. Which means it cant find the hdd to boot fromYes, that's the impression I've had. I've seen a couple of things about registry hacks and the like, but nothing I'm game to try.

Tony
20-06-2014, 04:46 PM
Follow up question - I assume you can put multiple partitions on a SSD if you wish?

linw
20-06-2014, 05:57 PM
Well, yes, you can change from IDE to AHCI and it is well worth it. It only requires enabling the AHCI drivers in the registry. Not really hard and not 'dangerous'.

If you go here http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976 there is a Mr Fixit who will kindly do it for you.

linw
20-06-2014, 06:02 PM
Yep, you can create partitions if you want. Just treat the drive like any other drive.

gary67
20-06-2014, 07:53 PM
Can you use normal backup software, I have active@ and make monthly C drive images using it (always tested) so was wondering if you can image an SSD using the same software?

CliveM
20-06-2014, 09:23 PM
Can you use normal backup software, I have active@ and make monthly C drive images using it (always tested) so was wondering if you can image an SSD using the same software?
Yes. That is what I do with Active@ and SSD C drive.

bk T
20-06-2014, 10:05 PM
Well, yes, you can change from IDE to AHCI and it is well worth it. It only requires enabling the AHCI drivers in the registry. Not really hard and not 'dangerous'.

If you go here http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976 there is a Mr Fixit who will kindly do it for you.

Will it work for Windows 8, too?

I'm tempted to change mine from IDE to AHCI but just too scare to do it.

What could be the worst scenario?

dugimodo
21-06-2014, 09:29 AM
Windows 8 is easier, you don't need to play with the registry just change a boot option, reboot and change to AHCI, then change it back.
Here's the instructions that worked for me http://pricklytech.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/windows-8-1-enabling-ahci-after-installing-windows/

gary67
21-06-2014, 09:39 AM
Yes. That is what I do with Active@ and SSD C drive.

Thanks

bk T
21-06-2014, 10:05 AM
Windows 8 is easier, you don't need to play with the registry just change a boot option, reboot and change to AHCI, then change it back.
Here's the instructions that worked for me http://pricklytech.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/windows-8-1-enabling-ahci-after-installing-windows/

Thanks, dugimodo for your instructions.

Changed it to AHCI, it works brilliantly. :)

Tony
23-06-2014, 10:05 AM
Just to let everyone know, I got a Samsung 840 EVO 256gGB and did a fresh install of Win7 on Saturday after changing the BIOS from IDE to AHCI. I am now seeing the desktop after about 20secs instead of 1m 30 (on a good day), and everything is just much more responsive. Of course some of that is going to be down to the fresh install, but this is certainly the fastest boot I've ever seen. I think it has finally finished doing the hundreds of updates and application of SP1, so hopefully it should be all good from now on.

All I have to do now is to reinstall everything - done the most important ones, but I suspect I shall be finding ones I've forgotten for months.

Thanks everyone for the advice and tips.

Speedy Gonzales
23-06-2014, 10:20 AM
Pays to update the firmware on it too. If it isnt up to date. It's an ISO on the Samsung site

Tony
23-06-2014, 10:29 AM
Pays to update the firmware on it too. If it isnt up to date. It's an ISO on the Samsung siteGood idea - I'll check it out. Thanks.

dugimodo
23-06-2014, 11:49 AM
A fresh install is great also because windows 7 (and 8) is aware of SSD's and sets itself up for them when installed. However to be sure you should install and run the samsung wizard software which is pretty good and either came with the drive or can be downloaded from their site. Lets you check windows is set correctly, test & benchmark the drive, manually do garbage collection (Trim), and has optimisation options.

One slightly contentious issue is the swap file, some prefer it on the SSD for speed, others like myself put it on another drive to reduce wear on the SSD. It's unlikely to be an issue either way but I thought I'd mention it. For me I don't notice any speed issues with it on a mechanical hdd and I prefer that option - also leaves more space for programs.

Tony
23-06-2014, 03:01 PM
Speedy, dugimodo:

According to the Magician software I have the latest firmware. One slightly embarrassing thing - the magician says "Your SSD will not deliver its maximum performance because your system does not support a SATA 6Gb/s (SATA3) port". I thought it did, but when I re-checked the manual it says "6 x SATA 3.0Gb/s connectors..." which I'd read as SATA3 connectors. D'Oh!

The system still seems pretty sprightly though.