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ianhnz
11-06-2014, 04:02 PM
Hi guys.

A week or so ago I installed Xbuntu 14.04 desktop amd 32 bit onto a Netbook that's been giving problems, since new and it's running a lot better.

Yesterday I downloaded Xbuntu 14.04 desktop amd 64 bit and have it running on a USB drive.

First off I noticed was running faster and the net is so much better to.

My question is, is it safe to load onto the netbook and when loaded will my saved things be still there and things like passwords and websites in Firefox?

I was hoping that something, like, Mozbackup could be used to transfer my Firefox settings from my windoz settings.

Any advise is greatly appreciated.

Ian

Speedy Gonzales
11-06-2014, 04:17 PM
Depends if there's a separate partition on it. Or if you can add one. Otherwise the 64 bit install, will wipe the 32 bit install

Wilko
11-06-2014, 04:24 PM
Before you install 64 bit Xubuntu, check that your netbook has a 64bit processor. Most early netbooks were 32 bit machines.
I would stick with your present 32bit version as there will be minimal improvement by changing.

ianhnz
11-06-2014, 04:50 PM
Thank you.

I was afraid of that..

ianhnz
11-06-2014, 04:51 PM
Before you install 64 bit Xubuntu, check that your netbook has a 64bit processor. Most early netbooks were 32 bit machines.
I would stick with your present 32bit version as there will be minimal improvement by changing.
The fact that it's running, off the USB, would that not mean that it is capable of running 64 bit?
Or, how can I astern that it's a 64 bit processor?

ianhnz
11-06-2014, 05:04 PM
Before you install 64 bit Xubuntu, check that your netbook has a 64bit processor. Most early netbooks were 32 bit machines.
I would stick with your present 32bit version as there will be minimal improvement by changing.

I did a Google and this seems to be it, model d270, http://www.engadget.com/products/acer/aspire/one/d270/specs/
Can you tell if it is 64 bit capable?

Rod J
11-06-2014, 05:04 PM
Try running the following in a terminal:
sudo lshw -C cpu
If the output has "width: 64 bits" somewhere that should tell you that it's a 64 bit CPU. Another way would be to search for the specs of the netbook online. (Edit: I see you just did that).

ianhnz
11-06-2014, 05:09 PM
Try running the following in a terminal:
sudo lshw -C cpu
If the output has "width: 64 bits" somewhere that should tell you that it's a 64 bit CPU. Another way would be to search for the specs of the netbook online. (Edit: I see you just did that).
Yes says it's, with 64 bits.
So question remains, should I do it, or not????????

Rod J
11-06-2014, 05:10 PM
According to this page the Intel Atom N2600 cpu is 64 bit: http://ark.intel.com/products/58916/Intel-Atom-Processor-N2600-%281M-Cache-1_6-GHz%29

Rod J
11-06-2014, 05:13 PM
I would say don't bother with 64 bit as 64 bit will use more memory and you only have 1Gb anyway. I'd say you'd be much better off with 32 bit on that netbook. It really isn't worth moving to 64 bit if you have less than 4Gb memory.

ianhnz
11-06-2014, 06:11 PM
I would say don't bother with 64 bit as 64 bit will use more memory and you only have 1Gb anyway. I'd say you'd be much better off with 32 bit on that netbook. It really isn't worth moving to 64 bit if you have less than 4Gb memory.

Yes, I was wondering, if system ram would be an issue.

Thank you.

johnd
11-06-2014, 10:35 PM
I have my eee netbook running on Lubuntu 14.04 64 bits with 2GB RAM and it goes fine. My feeling is that if the processor bus width is 64 bit and you have enough RAM (1GB is marginal) you are better off with the 64bit OS. I was running Lubuntu 12.04 64 bit with 1GB for quite a while - usable but slow.

johnd
11-06-2014, 10:47 PM
There seem to be a number of sites on the web that say that a 64 bit OS does require more RAM than a 32 bit one - but it is marginally more not twice as much.

- see the 5th reply on this site:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/38d0ba0f-b481-4486-8b0e-ac780cce48c0/why-windows-7-64bit-requires-twice-as-much-ram-as-the-32bit-version?forum=w7itproperf

ianhnz
12-06-2014, 12:44 AM
Okay, I did a restart, removing USB and booted to the installed version, but now have a problem.

I am unable to access the internet and the icon, that was there, has good.

Anyone able to help me to reconnect?

I did reboot to the 64 bit and the internet works on that?

Thanks

ianhnz
12-06-2014, 12:59 AM
Okay, I did a restart, removing USB and booted to the installed version, but now have a problem.

I am unable to access the internet and the icon, that was there, has good.

Anyone able to help me to reconnect?

I did reboot to the 64 bit and the internet works on that?

Thanks

It's okay, panic over.

I just read through the help section, put in a few commands, that made no sense and it worked.

Mind you, I thought windows was confusing 20 years ago...

Nick G
12-06-2014, 12:20 PM
It's okay, panic over.

I just read through the help section, put in a few commands, that made no sense and it worked.

Mind you, I thought windows was confusing 20 years ago...
Give it a bit of time and you'll start to get a feel for it :thumbs:

Then you'll boot into Windows and wonder why sudo apt-get install won't work :D

ianhnz
12-06-2014, 01:04 PM
Give it a bit of time and you'll start to get a feel for it :thumbs:

Then you'll boot into Windows and wonder why sudo apt-get install won't work :D

Hey Nick, yes I am starting to enjoy it.

I did a Linux couse, must be over 25 years ago and can only remember LS, line scroll and Exit.

For the life of me, I can't remember and more.

Mind you I'm 61 now and went from Windows 3 upto Windows 7.

I've a quick play, with Windows 8, when a friend was having problems and managed to get it sorted.

So there's hope for the, old fella, yet.

I installed a firewall and Comodo antivirus, on it last week.

Just run, Shields Up and passed all the tests, so can't be too bad.

Mind you, I've had some great help, on this F1 over the years too.

I was jut re reading yours and notice that the command Sudo is used a lot.

Can I ask, what it's a command for? (Mind you I just read, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudo and even more confused now).

Ian

Nick G
12-06-2014, 02:17 PM
I was jut re reading yours and notice that the command Sudo is used a lot.

Can I ask, what it's a command for? (Mind you I just read, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudo and even more confused now).

Ian
Sudo is basically how you run a command as the superuser. You've got to use it to do a few things, like updating or installing software.

If say, I wanted to install totem:
apt-get totem - won't work, not run as superuser
sudo apt-get totem - will work, as I'm running the command as superuser.

fred_fish
12-06-2014, 04:45 PM
Although that pervasive (ab)use of sudo is particular to ubuntu and derivatives thereof.

In most distro's you "become root" with the 'su' command (or just log in as root), do the admin stuff and then exit the root account.

Using sudo for everything blurs the line between a regular user account and the administrator account, which is half the problem with windows security, and generally just a bad habit for users to get into.

Rod J
12-06-2014, 06:24 PM
Yes, but in the *buntu's you still have to enter your password to make the sudo do it's stuff so I don't think it's quite that easy to forget you're executing commands as root (Linux newbies: "root" = "administrator"). You can also use "sudo -i" in a terminal to execute multiple commands as root with having to prefix sudo to every command.

johnd
12-06-2014, 09:49 PM
Also by default it is only the first user created that can sudo. Any other users will need to be made part of the sudoers group.