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View Full Version : How do I reclaim Unallocated Space from my Hard Drive after deleting unused partitions?



12-12-2001, 10:58 PM
My HDD had 3 partitions (Dos, W2K, W2k). The second W2k being for beta testing. Following a beta problem I had to ghost back the second W2K partition. For some unknown reason this corrupted the MBR which I was unable to fix. Had no choice but to delete the second W2K partition and at the same time decided to delete the DOS partition as it was no longer required. I now have two 'unallocated spaces' either side on the remaining W2K partition. Combined they take up more than 50% of the HDD so would like to reclaim them. Have tried Partition Magic Undelete, Merge and Redistribute but they do not recognise 'unallocated space'(disk was originally partitioned with PM). Fdisk does not see the unallocated partitions. How do I get my space back?
The remaining W2K boots & works fine.
Thanks

Sergio

13-12-2001, 11:22 AM
Eek.

You've tried most things I would think of.

Is the version of PM aware of Win2K format?

Does win2k let you do it from inside Disk Manager?

Robo.

14-12-2001, 05:40 PM
If you are prepared to start from an empty disk --- after appropriate backups --- IBM give away a little DOS programme called 'zap.exe'. It shoots the first sector, so it is a clean disk.

You can get it from http://service.boulder.ibm.com/storage/hddtech/. There's another called 'wipe.exe', which wipes the whole disk, and a few more diagnostics etc. I have an idea that people in companies like IBM have problems too. And they write tools to get out of trouble.

14-12-2001, 09:48 PM
Thanks for your assistance. I have fixed the problem and in case it helps others have put the solution up here:

Using Partition Magic, right click the active partition to the left of the unallocated space and re-size it across. It basically covers it up then on re-boot DOS writes it permantely therby reclaiming the space. There is also a handy little tool called partinfo.exe which gives you access to the code making up the partition and allows it to be edited. Not for the faint hearted!

Sergio