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View Full Version : Copyright - superfast broadband



johnnymax
27-03-2014, 02:56 PM
With all the hoohah over copyright with Dotcoms impending extradition, MP3.coms $41m fine, why is nothing being done about Youtube.
I'm somewhat incredulous that every newmovie, music videos, etc is available within days of release yet it's not getting sued for billions.

Another point is why do NEED superfast broadband? oh that's right so we can download copyrighted movies from Youtube...........

Chilling_Silence
27-03-2014, 03:25 PM
What's your point? Is this just a rant?

johnnymax
27-03-2014, 03:38 PM
I would like to know why Youtube isn't chased.
I would like to know why Kimmy boy wants superfast broadband when he can get all the latest movies out of his Mega files. (bet he's got a backdoor)

Billy T
27-03-2014, 03:59 PM
I would like to know why Youtube isn't chased.
I would like to know why Kimmy boy wants superfast broadband when he can get all the latest movies out of his Mega files. (bet he's got a backdoor)

First question is valid.

Second question is none of your business, and the premise you posit is pure speculation.


Why would any person want superfast broadband?

Probably to shorten the World Wide Wait, and who wouldn't?

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Chilling_Silence
27-03-2014, 04:07 PM
Point is the American law is completely screwed up. Look up SOPA and similar things, and see why they represented such a huge threat to the likes of Facebook / YouTube etc

It's also why they've changed what charges they're trying to get Dotcom on.

Also, once you've got yourself VDSL2 or UFB Fibre, you'll understand. Until then, it's hard to appreciate it by speculating ;) Billy T's right! Why would you wanna wait?

inphinity
27-03-2014, 04:11 PM
I would like to know why Youtube isn't chased.
I would like to know why Kimmy boy wants superfast broadband when he can get all the latest movies out of his Mega files. (bet he's got a backdoor)

1) They are, they are constantly attempting to comply with DMCA notices etc. They pull down huge amounts of content on a daily basis.

2) Because like the rest of us, taking eight years to do anything because of crappy slow internet is a pain? Gosh, noone will ever need faster than a 300bps modem!

1/10 for trolling effort.

dugimodo
27-03-2014, 04:33 PM
Every new movie is available within days on youtube? I've never found anything but very old poor quality movies on youtube. I think you may be exaggerating just a touch. Also with regards to music Videos - they are mostly on there legitimately and even when not the copyright holders often don't care.

I know you can purchase music videos online in a few places but it's not a market the music industry ever seemed too concerned about, they seem to release the videos freely to promote sales of the music rather than try to restrict and sell them like they do with the songs. I never understood in the old days why you couldn't buy music videos, most music video releases on VHS/DVD were live concerts. Of course legally you can only watch the youtube videos and not download them.

wainuitech
27-03-2014, 05:16 PM
Why super fast BB, Well illegal movies and music aside, downloading programs and drivers daily on a slow internet is painful.

Lets say you want to download a Trial version of Windows all completely legal from Microsoft, it could be 3.6GB, slow BB, soon get pissed off waiting.

If you download drivers from various places times money if you are charging someone by the hour and they wont be to happy having to pay more because your BB is slow and takes longer.

Not everyone who has fast BB uses it solely for downloading illegal content.

When downloading a legally brought video / Music ( say from iTunes) you don't want to wait hours to get it,OR streaming quickflix, a slow connection will cause lag.

If doing a speed test I peak out at 130Mbps -- lots of people cant get anywhere near that, and even when downloading you are still waiting on internet traffic and the server releasing the data.

icow
27-03-2014, 06:26 PM
edit: nvm

1) Youtube doesn't get sued because their takedown system is the one of the biggest pieces of bullshit on the internet. It's so unbelievably biased towards the supposed "copyright holder" (or anyone who hit the takedown button) it's not funny. It's a guilty until proven innoscent system which relies on the honesty (and in some cases competence) of the organisation which had the video taken down. Also I believe they recently implemented a system allowing copyright holders to identify and claim their works within other videos, copyright holders are then able to monetize their work through other videos. So if you see x pop song posted by youtubeuser123 and it's monetized chances are the copyright holder is the one getting the revenue from the ads.

2) A backdoor into Mega for Kim's personal use would be ridiculous, the fact that no one but the holder of the encryption key can decrypt stuff on Mega is a precaution which limits what action can be taken against the site. ISPs charge for the transit of pirated data, suppose we should shut them down? Postal services charge for the transit of illicit substances? Shut the post down too? Hell lets ditch money, people use it to pay for illegal things.

3) There are various legitimate services available in New Zealand which could benefit from faster internet: iTunes, Steam, Twitch.tv, Quickflix, UV, Youtube, OnLive. Basically anything which deals with HD video or large files benefits from faster net. Decreases in latency would boost online gaming within NZ. What happens when 4k or 8k video becomes standard? Going on Netflix numbers you'd require around a constant 32mbit download to be able to stream videos that way. That's well above the average connection speed in NZ.

Chilling_Silence
27-03-2014, 06:31 PM
I stream my movies now from Google Play Movies to my Chromecast. It's fantastic!

icow
27-03-2014, 06:55 PM
You can even stream movies from Youtube now (http://www.youtube.com/movies)

gary67
27-03-2014, 07:15 PM
We all four of us watch nearly every TV program we want to see on demand so it's not illegal but we don't all want to watch the same thing at the same time

decibel
27-03-2014, 08:37 PM
You can even stream movies from Youtube now (http://www.youtube.com/movies)

Yes - but those prices don't compare well with Netflix's monthly fee for as many movies as you want -

icow
27-03-2014, 09:11 PM
Never said it was cheaper.

Agent_24
27-03-2014, 09:47 PM
Another point is why do NEED superfast broadband?

Because with more and more people getting it, more and more websites have services which expect you to have it.

Also, lag is a leading cause of anger issues in humans.

1101
28-03-2014, 01:02 PM
Another point is why do NEED superfast broadband? oh that's right so we can download copyrighted movies from Youtube...........


Why do we NEED the internet at all. The world has & will function perfectly without it.
Why do we NEED PC's , cars, TV's, microwave ovens. You could easily argue MOST dont NEED any of the those
:p

We WANT superfast broadband. And you know exactly why we WANT it, Business now rely on fast internet for Cloud based services
Home users will want to stream movies at a descent res, from legitimate sites. We want fast internet to sync with dropbox etc.

The big difference between megaupload (NOT Mega) & youtube is Megaupload was used primarily for piracy, and they knew it. (just my opinion, I knew what it was being used for)
Thats why some similar sites closed themselves down just after the megaupload raid: the other similar sites knew what they were used for & owners didnt want to risk arrest.
Youtube isnt used primarily for piracy.

A more reasonable argument might be, why arnt ISP's being indited: they know exactly what home users use 50G+ data caps for
ISP's never made any effort to block access to known piracy sites & piracy portals/forums .

Agent_24
28-03-2014, 01:46 PM
They know it would be stupid to blame ISPs because that would be as stupid as blaming Seagate for selling hard drives, because we all know pirates primarily store pirated material on them.

icow
28-03-2014, 02:15 PM
They gave it a good shot in Australia anyway (http://www.nbr.co.nz/article/landmark-australian-internet-piracy-case-has-nz-ramifications-ck-117285)