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DeSade
18-03-2014, 04:07 PM
Is there anyone with experience in electronic soldering that would be willing to but together a few adapters for me?
Reply for details.

Greg
18-03-2014, 05:41 PM
Is there anyone with experience in electronic soldering that would be willing to but together a few adapters for me?
Reply for details.I'd love to help, and my little brother is very good at this, but he happens to be in Auckland. :-(

Billy T
18-03-2014, 05:46 PM
Is there anyone with experience in electronic soldering that would be willing to but together a few adapters for me?
Reply for details.

Your info is a bit sparse. What type of adapters are you thinking about, how many, what do you expect them to do etc. Some adapters are easy to fabricate, others are nigh on impossible or have a very short operating life due to fragility etc.

A picture is worth a thousand words.......

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

DeSade
18-03-2014, 05:53 PM
The adapters are for RC.
The batteries I have do not fit with the connectors on the models.

5626

This is an example of a Male XT60 to a Female T-Connector

Right now I am not sure what connectors I want to use but I can't buy the leads I need anywhere here as I have been looking for months.
Shipping them over takes just as long as looking for them here so I need another way.

Basically its soldering wire onto plugs.

These can be couriered up and down the country for $5 so I don't care where you are located if you are willing to help.

I need 4 of these.

Agent_24
18-03-2014, 07:13 PM
Looks fairly easy.

DeSade
18-03-2014, 07:41 PM
There are tutorials for specific connectors on you tube makes it even easier.
I would do it myself but I have never soldered in my life.

Is that a offer Agent?

Agent_24
18-03-2014, 08:02 PM
Yeah I could do it if you want, but I suspect you'd have to courier the stuff to me though.

DeSade
18-03-2014, 08:11 PM
Yeah I could do it if you want, but I suspect you'd have to courier the stuff to me though.

That is not a problem.
As soon as I decide on the plugs I will source them and send you a package with all you need.
Can you please PM me your address.

Agent_24
18-03-2014, 08:32 PM
That is not a problem.
As soon as I decide on the plugs I will source them and send you a package with all you need.
Can you please PM me your address.

PM sent.

Make sure the connectors you choose can handle whatever current you want to draw through them, same goes with the wire.

CliveM
18-03-2014, 08:42 PM
Why not buy yourself a soldering iron and some core solder from the likes of Tricky Dicky or Jaycar. Spend a little time playing around with a bit of wire and teach youself how to solder. It is cheap and easy and is a useful skill to aquire.

DeSade
18-03-2014, 09:03 PM
I intend to do just that Clive.
But I need these done correctly or I risk my $1000 boat catching fire.
This is not the thing to learn on.

dugimodo
18-03-2014, 10:07 PM
Soldering is pretty easy, you could practice soldering wires together and onto lugs until you are happy with the results. When you get the heat just right it's like the joint just sucks the solder in. A poor joint won't hold under pressure and is easy to spot after you've seen a few good ones. A fine grade flux cored solder and a reasonable 20-40W iron with a fine tip is perfect for that sort of thing. Your picture has heatshrink tubing as well, definately worth using for a professional job and you can shrink it with the iron with a bit of care (no need to touch it just get close). wear safety glasses and use a damp sponge to clean excess solder off the tip while it's still hot.

The worse thing I see people doing is using overly heavy gauge solder and either an over or under sized Iron or try to pour liquid solder onto a joint thinking that'll work. Too much heat will melt insulation and damage components, too little and the solder won't stick. The metal should be hot enough that the solder melts on contact, you apply the solder to the tip in a small amount for good heat transfer but then let the joint up and apply the solder directly to the metal/wire . If it's hot enough it'll melt on contact and flow into the joint - remove the heat as soon as the solder has flowed and try to keep everything still. A small vice or something to hold things in place is very helpful. it only takes a few seconds once you have the knack.

I typed all that then realised there are probably better instructions on you tube :)

Agent_24
18-03-2014, 10:18 PM
I typed all that then realised there are probably better instructions on you tube :)

Yeah ;) Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_NU2ruzyc4

Metla
19-03-2014, 12:34 AM
Deans plugs are the standard for RC's.

Not only do they work perfectly but you can buy batteries, chargers, speed controllers,etc with them already fitted. If you have an item without a deans plug then there are plenty of adaptors to use so you can intergrate them into a deans plug fitted system.

The only issue is they transfer heat so effectively that if you aren't a gun at soldering they heat up and melt the plastic surround, which distorts and makes them unusable.

I pay someone else to do all of mine.....

Metla
19-03-2014, 12:35 AM
Hair dryers are the hot ticket for heat shrink.

DeSade
19-03-2014, 12:41 AM
Most of my stuff now is Dean's (T Connectors) but the boat I brought has EC3, (Pain in the ass)
I have also been told that the EC3 on the boat might not be able to handle the batteries I intend to use so I might have to get those replaced too, hence the fact I am not sure what connectors I will be using.

What is your interest Metla, Cars Planes or Boats?

Metla
19-03-2014, 12:56 AM
Currently have about 5 RC buggies, a few on road cars, a monster truck, and a crawler.

Dabbled in planes for a short period a few years back.

DeSade
19-03-2014, 01:13 AM
It is boats for me.
My interest lies primarily in scale models but only got one so far.
Also got a couple of fast electrics and a yacht for when the batteries run down :)