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Jen
04-03-2014, 04:31 PM
Hiya all,

As PF1 members are a wealth of knowledge, I thought I would ask here for advice. My kitchen has just been ripped out and there was damage to the wall board - from tiles being removed, previous poor plasterboard surface from wallpaper removal and fresh holes from the electrician. I got a gib-board repairer/plasterer in to fix the wall, but he only had the one day to do so, so I agreed to do the final sanding after the kitchen was in.

However, I can see in places the gib-board outer paper lining has lifted from the plaster board, resulting in small bubbles. What is the best way of fixing these? I did think to sand it back with fine sandpaper, refill the area and then sand smooth before undercoating - is this OK? I didn't want to end up making a mess of the wall in my attempts to fix it. :p

In hindsight, I should have had the walls ripped back to framing and new gib-board installed, but the time frames were tight.

Cheers.

Bryan
04-03-2014, 04:45 PM
There will be better answers but I'd be inclined to use a VERY sharp knife - say a box cutter. Carefully slice the paper off so that you get to the plaster below. If it is all OK there, sand the edge of the hole you have made, fill the hole with a good Polyfilla or the like. Wait a day or so until it has fully cured and dried. Then sand using a sanding block under your sand paper to get a good flat finish. If there are imperfections, use the Polyfilla again. Paint with a sealer then undercoat and to do a good job, two top coats.

gary67
04-03-2014, 06:34 PM
Mainly as Bryan says but use a good fine surface filler or even Gib+4 if you can get a small enough quantity. Don't skimp on the quality of the filler it makes a huge difference

Cicero
04-03-2014, 09:56 PM
I would ask the plasterer.

Jen
05-03-2014, 05:46 PM
Thanks for the advice. Now I've got lights back on in the kitchen I can see the bubbling occurs in several spots over a 1.2 m wide area. I have decided it would be easier to make my glass splash back 1.4 m wide, thereby covering up the dodgy stuff. :D

Cicero
05-03-2014, 06:00 PM
Glass is a nice splash board.

Bryan
05-03-2014, 07:22 PM
I don't want to scare you but what made the bubbles occur? Nothing nasty behind the board is there? Anyway, the splash back will cover it all nicely.

Jen
05-03-2014, 08:07 PM
The bubbles are from the very top layer of the gib-board paper, separating from the other paper layers. You can push down on the bubbles and flatten them (temporarily). This would have occurred when removing the wallpaper backing by spraying it with water and then scraping it off. As the wall board surface was damaged, the water only made the paper lift. I also suspect the thin layer of wet plaster also made the dodgy areas worse.

I asked a company about a glass splash back today, and said I wanted it mechanically fixed to the wall rather than gluing it on. I didn't want to replace wall board again if I had to remove the glass in the future. The guy looked at me as if I was nuts. He said I was the first person to ask this. I thought it was a reasonable request as mirrors can be mounted in a top & bottom J-molding.

Cicero
05-03-2014, 08:25 PM
http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=4141709
A few points.

Jen
05-03-2014, 08:37 PM
Thanks for the link. :) As mentioned in the link, it is easy to have a bold colour and swap it out in 5 years or so if you grow sick of it.

Billy T
06-03-2014, 11:36 AM
I got a gib-board repairer/plasterer in to fix the wall, but he only had the one day to do so, so I agreed to do the final sanding after the kitchen was in. However, I can see in places the gib-board outer paper lining has lifted from the plaster board, resulting in small bubbles.

That is a very poor job by the 'tradesman' you have used and he should come back and recitfy it at his own expense, unless of course you agreed to a substandard job.

It is quite straight-forward to produce a 'paint standard' finish on old gib board, and even as a rank amateur I was able to restore ancient gib to a perfect surface following enthusiatic wallpaper removal by Mrs T and our rather young children while I was out of town on business. It was VERY damaging, exposing the actual plaster core in many places and some was fibrous plaster which can be even harder to repair, especially when the fibres are showing (I burned them back, you can't shave them).

I have since stripped the wallpaper in our downstairs bathroom which was very old, and again in our semi-ensuite (two access doors) upstairs and prepared them to paint finish standard . All it took was patience plus good lighting, and the results were amazing, you'd swear that the walls were virgin gib-board and there are zero signs of joins, gib clouts or any other blemishes.

If an amateur can achieve that standard, so should your 'tradesman', therefore he should put it right. I'd call in an independent professional and get their opinion of his work.

One look should be enough!

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Jen
13-03-2014, 08:21 PM
Thanks for the additional advice Billy.

But I have good news! After applying Resene Broadwall Surface Prep & Seal, the 'bubbles' all but disappeared! This was before I gave the prep & seal a sand after it was dry too. Maybe the thick paint pulled the raised bits in. The paint is designed to recondition wall boards that have been previously papered.

I am still going ahead with the oversized glass splash back as I think it will look better than a small one - and better splatter coverage too. :p

Jen
28-03-2014, 04:42 PM
Final update. Managed to find someone who would fit the glass splash back using a fineline mirror mount track system.

Attach are before and after photos of the kitchen. Very happy with the glass splash back appearance. :thumbs:

R2x1
28-03-2014, 04:56 PM
Good grief, now you have to eat out. It would be mischievous in the extreme to risk anything happening to the new setup.

Jen
28-03-2014, 05:06 PM
Nah, I have bigger worries. The entire bathroom is being ripped out next week.... the ONLY bathroom in the house. Should be a 'fun' experience. :waughh:

WalOne
28-03-2014, 05:10 PM
Nah ... not a real lived in kitchen. Where are the fridge magnets, for a starter?

prefect
28-03-2014, 05:35 PM
It could be damage from the Norwegian gib beetle, nasty insect.

Billy T
28-03-2014, 06:31 PM
Nah, I have bigger worries. The entire bathroom is being ripped out next week.... the ONLY bathroom in the house. Should be a 'fun' experience. :waughh:

Nah, no sweat Jen!

Where's ya sense of adventure? Our family of six (2A/4K 2M/4F) used to do a six week stint at our bach every Christmas and there was no bathroom at all, no hot water, just the kitchen sink, a red plastic dish, a cold tap and an electric kettle.

Dunny was the usual outdoor long drop, made moderately civilised by an electric light and an extractor fan under the seat that vented outside and well above roof level (I was a precocious child and knew nothing of Electrical Regulations, but I did engineer an isolated supply using two old radio transformers, so nobody died.) You had to plug it in at the stove before venturing forth.

A few days being hosed down out the back and getting scrubbed down with a yard broom should be fun, especially if the neighbours join in with their garden hoses too!

Post Photos :D

Cheers

Billy 8-{) :devil

gary67
28-03-2014, 07:03 PM
I'm not commenting on the kitchen as I design them for a living. The splashback however looks fantastic as does the kitchen. Ok so I did comment.

Jen
28-03-2014, 09:52 PM
A few days being hosed down out the back and getting scrubbed down with a yard broom should be fun, especially if the neighbours join in with their garden hoses too!

Post Photos :DI'd rather just wear extra deodorant...


I'm not commenting on the kitchen as I design them for a living. The splashback however looks fantastic as does the kitchen. Ok so I did comment.Thanks Gary. :)

williambrown
24-05-2014, 08:01 PM
The process of bubbling is common where the paint comes in contact with moisture. The best you can do is to de-sand the wall surface completely and let it be dry properly. Only after that apply a coat of primer first then the final coat of paint. Try this and if the problem is very serious, do contact with the local professionals for best possible solutions.