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Geek4414
27-11-2013, 09:09 AM
Question to the SSD experts ...

Am considering replacing a PATA HDD on an old server (desktop PC running MS Server 2003) with either a SATA HDD or SATA SSD. Will there be much improvement in throughput going from a PATA HDD to a SATA HDD? SSD would obviously be way faster if it is supported on this old PC, the Motherboard is ASUSTek P5G41T-MLX and current HDD is 160GB PATA WD1600AAJB-00J3A0, is there any known issues with using SSD on an relatively old PC and old Server OS?

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Another question is the reliability and durability of SSD. Is it safe to run a SSD for a client/server database system serving around 10 users. If so, any recommendation on a brand/model?

They are only using about 75GB of the 160GB at the moment, so probably can go with a 120GB "consumer" SSD which is not much more than a "consumer" 500GB HDD anyway. Hopefully, if we decide to go the SSD route, I can just clone the drive across, the cloning dock requires the destination to be larger than the source drive, but hopefully some of the other cloning software can just clone the partition.

dugimodo
27-11-2013, 09:35 AM
I can't help with server OS questions but the difference between a current SATA HDD and an older PATA one should be fairly noticeable, they have gotten steadily faster over the years. The first generation SATA drives were not measurably any quicker than PATA.

Not sure how it would go in a server but a friend just upgraded to a seagate SSHD hybrid as a compromise on his desktop and it's pretty impressive - has a built in 8GB SSD cache drive and boots and launches common programs almost the same as a SSD would.

It's my understanding that SSD is perfect for server applications with it's low access time and High IOPS but at the same time a desktop SSD might not be ideal due to the potentially greatly increased read/write cycles in a server. They do make enterprise SSDs for this purpose but you'll pay a premium for one of those.

Geek4414
27-11-2013, 10:22 AM
I can't help with server OS questions but the difference between a current SATA HDD and an older PATA one should be fairly noticeable, they have gotten steadily faster over the years. The first generation SATA drives were not measurably any quicker than PATA.

Not sure how it would go in a server but a friend just upgraded to a seagate SSHD hybrid as a compromise on his desktop and it's pretty impressive - has a built in 8GB SSD cache drive and boots and launches common programs almost the same as a SSD would.

It's my understanding that SSD is perfect for server applications with it's low access time and High IOPS but at the same time a desktop SSD might not be ideal due to the potentially greatly increased read/write cycles in a server. They do make enterprise SSDs for this purpose but you'll pay a premium for one of those.

Thanks for your input Dugimodo. I haven't thought about the hybrid drives, but I guess with the minimal difference in cost with "consumer" HDD and SSD, it is probably not going to matter too much. Will have to see how much an "Enterprise" SSD would cost. Not sure if it would be really worth the while if the PC is not enterprise grade hardware anyway. This is really a stop gap measure to squeeze more performance out of the old box, they may replace the server in a year's time, Server 2003 is getting a bit long in the tooth anyway.

I love mSATA SSD on my Vaio Pro, cold boots Windows 8.1 in about 5 seconds! Can't believe it really, my Vaio Z with Quad-RAID0 SSD still take ages to boot Windows 7. I guess a large part of it is that Windows 8 does boot way faster than Windows 7 and the mSATA SSD is a few generation ahead of the SSD in the Vaio Z. Even though the Vaio Pro is not supposed to be a replacement for the Z series, it is certainly light years ahead in overall experience so far.

1101
28-11-2013, 09:19 AM
A few questions
Is this server used in a business, or home, or just something you are playing around with?
A single IDE drive Im guessing ?

If its used in a business, do it properly. Put Enterprise grade SATA's in there. A mirrored pair at least.

You might also run into some big issues changing the HD type(IDE to SATA) on the C:\ .
That m/b doesnt seem to be too ancient. I really have to ask why anyone would build any system on a SATA mb & use some old IDE drive ??
If thats the mindset of whoever built this sever, what other surprises are in there :D
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P5G41TM_LX/
Seriously consider starting again & doing it properly .

Geek4414
28-11-2013, 11:29 PM
A few questions
Is this server used in a business, or home, or just something you are playing around with?
A single IDE drive Im guessing ?

If its used in a business, do it properly. Put Enterprise grade SATA's in there. A mirrored pair at least.

You might also run into some big issues changing the HD type(IDE to SATA) on the C:\ .
That m/b doesnt seem to be too ancient. I really have to ask why anyone would build any system on a SATA mb & use some old IDE drive ??
If thats the mindset of whoever built this sever, what other surprises are in there :D
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P5G41TM_LX/
Seriously consider starting again & doing it properly .

I totally agree with you, I have no idea why it was built that way. The server is running pretty mission critical stuff but trying to tell client to start from a clean slate is not easy! They just want to squeeze a bit more performance out of the current box right now, will be another year before they will look at replacing it.

Change from IDE to SATA could introduce some problem with the SATA driver after cloning the drive, haven't thought about that actually. Thanks for reminding me! Any suggestion on what need to be done?

SolMiester
30-11-2013, 12:18 PM
I can't help with server OS questions but the difference between a current SATA HDD and an older PATA one should be fairly noticeable, they have gotten steadily faster over the years. The first generation SATA drives were not measurably any quicker than PATA.

Not sure how it would go in a server but a friend just upgraded to a seagate SSHD hybrid as a compromise on his desktop and it's pretty impressive - has a built in 8GB SSD cache drive and boots and launches common programs almost the same as a SSD would.

It's my understanding that SSD is perfect for server applications with it's low access time and High IOPS but at the same time a desktop SSD might not be ideal due to the potentially greatly increased read/write cycles in a server. They do make enterprise SSDs for this purpose but you'll pay a premium for one of those.

If you wish to keep the existing build, you would have to inject SATA drivers etc into the boot which could get messy.

I would suggest doing a P2V convert to core HyperV or ESXi and if you wish to use SSD, you could try a mirror array for the Datastore for the VMs..Keep your system intact and transfer to a faster platform with redundancy.