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Tukapa
19-05-2013, 12:50 AM
Hi all

I did a search and read previous posts and recommendations.

Basically I joined up with Snap and got the Fritzbox 7340. I have no issues with the modem/router except the wireless range seems to be a bit weak (weaker than my last modem).

As a result I don't get good coverage at the other end of the house. I do have cat5 cable wired throughout the house and I have a spare ethernet wall jack at the other end of the house so was looking at using this (http://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?ItemID=409336) to extend the wireless range.

Am I right in thinking this would work well? Any advice or alternative suggestions gratefully received.

Thanks.

wainuitech
19-05-2013, 01:10 AM
Something like that will work. You have to read the instructions on how to set them up correctly, its NOT just a case of plugging them in and going.

I have a older version of the TP-Link in the lounge, works ok, I also have one of These Netgears (http://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?ItemID=399778) in the workshop, and have put many into customers houses, all work as expected.

Speedy Gonzales
19-05-2013, 08:22 AM
What firmware is on it?? If I'm on the right site it maybe up to 5.51 as of April 25th this year

Tukapa
19-05-2013, 10:28 AM
Something like that will work. You have to read the instructions on how to set them up correctly, its NOT just a case of plugging them in and going.

I have a older version of the TP-Link in the lounge, works ok, I also have one of These Netgears (http://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?ItemID=399778) in the workshop, and have put many into customers houses, all work as expected.

Thanks Wainui - are you saying the Netgear is a better option or merely another option? I can't see me needing the 4 port switch but I guess it's future proofing for an extra $12 over the 1 port TP Link.....

wainuitech
19-05-2013, 11:09 AM
I'm saying the Netgear is another option.

There was a thread here a while back, and the person who had a TP-Link ( not to sure if it was the same model) was having a lot of problems. Never did find out if it was sorted or not. I'm NOT saying the TP-LINK is no good, just saying I personally have installed a few of the Netgears and once you know how to set them up ( read the manual LOL) they work as expected.

I did look at the TP-LINK manual and its basically the same type of setup.

Chilling_Silence
19-05-2013, 12:15 PM
The standard TP-Link firmware sucks, but the hardware is absolutely bloody marvellous. If you flash something like Gargoyle on the TP-Link TL-WR1043ND then you have a combination of some of the best hardware available along with fantastic and rock-solid fimware.

Tukapa
20-05-2013, 05:28 PM
The standard TP-Link firmware sucks, but the hardware is absolutely bloody marvellous. If you flash something like Gargoyle on the TP-Link TL-WR1043ND then you have a combination of some of the best hardware available along with fantastic and rock-solid fimware.

I see that the TP-Link TL-WR1043ND is a router rather than just an access point. Will that router work the same as an access point (similar to what I and Wainui linked to above)? Plug it into a spare Ethernet wall point at the other end of the house, set it up and then it extends my wireless network to that end of the house?

Alex B
20-05-2013, 05:33 PM
One of the guys at work just joined snap and had a similar issue, ended up with one of these, says it works well and was easy to set up.


http://www.gowifi.co.nz/access-points-802.11/indoor-wireless-access-points/engenius-erb9250-802.11n-universal-repeater.html

BBCmicro
20-05-2013, 08:07 PM
..../indoor-wireless-access-points/engenius-erb9250-802.11n-universal-repeater....

I think a wireless repeater reduces throughput by 4x if all devices see each other RF-wise. (The remote laptop might not see the AP enough to allow reliable communication but it could easily cause interference.) It's much better to use Cat5 to another AP on a different frequency.

I used to have Cat5 between my Desktop and router then wireless to a video capture device. I got 2MB/s downloading captures to my desktop (ftp).

Then I bought a desktop MB with built-in Wifi and used the Wifi instead of Cat5 to the router. Dowloading captures has dropped to 0.5MB/s. I think that is the same as using a wireless repeater - 3 devices seeing each other on the same frequency with traffic going through them in series.

(I don't think a wireless repeater can be configured to transmit on a different frequency if it has only one physical port, the antenna. It wouldn't help anyway as none of the devices can transmit and receive at the same time regardless of frequency. But I am not an expert.)

Alex B
20-05-2013, 08:39 PM
I don't really get what you're saying to be honest. Wireless is always going to be slower than Ethernet.

Chilling_Silence
21-05-2013, 10:12 AM
I see that the TP-Link TL-WR1043ND is a router rather than just an access point. Will that router work the same as an access point (similar to what I and Wainui linked to above)? Plug it into a spare Ethernet wall point at the other end of the house, set it up and then it extends my wireless network to that end of the house?

Yes :) Especially if you flash something like Gargoyle firmware, it makes it incredibly simply to get it setup like you're wanting (Guide on my blog).


I don't really get what you're saying to be honest. Wireless is always going to be slower than Ethernet.
Yeah Wireless is not only slower, but it's half-duplex (Can only send or receive) so if you're using something like a Wireless Repeater, where you'd see yourself connecting at, say, 54mbps, you'd never get anywhere near that. At absolute best you'd get around 18mbps.
However, if you're using a repeater, it's likely because you're not in a "best case scenario", so where you'll see yourself connecting around 12mbps, you might only actually attain 2-4mbps