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View Full Version : What is a USB hub?



JJJJJ
12-05-2013, 11:13 AM
I have just been reading BillyT's post on hubs and am wondering if a USB hub is what I want.
I am short of usb connections and am looking for something to increase the numbers. Can I plug something into a usb and get extra connections? Same as a powerboard. I have two six plug powerboards and I want the same for USB's.
I have an Asus sabretooth motherboard and an Antec 1200 case.
I have had a computer for over 20 years but have had no training, just learn by trial and error.
Jack:wub

Nick G
12-05-2013, 11:21 AM
Pretty much, although USB hubs can be unreliable, so I wouldn't go plugging things that draw lots of power (HDDs, iPods and the like) into it (Because the power the USB port can give is split amongst the extra ports the hub adds. For that reason, I'd also plug the hub into one of the usb ports on the back of the computer (as these ports tend to provide more power than ones at the front of the desktop).

Poppa John
12-05-2013, 11:50 AM
Aren't there USB hubs with built in power supply to avoid loading the PC supply? PJ

Chilling_Silence
12-05-2013, 11:58 AM
Aren't there USB hubs with built in power supply to avoid loading the PC supply? PJ

Yes some do , but its more to help power the devices as opposed to saving the motherboard from anything :-)

Blue Druid
12-05-2013, 12:07 PM
Got one of these (http://jaycar.co.nz/ShowLargephoto.asp?id=13734&PRODNAME=10%20Port%20USB%20Hub&IMAGE=) powered hubs from Jaycar and it has been fine with ext HDD, printers, etc. Four ports are switchable. It has performed flawlessly for the 4-odd years that I've had it. Of course, not all 4 printers plus HDD are in use simultaneously but a DVD burner (external) plus wireless keyboard and mouse as well as the HDD may well be.

Agent_24
12-05-2013, 08:53 PM
Aren't there USB hubs with built in power supply to avoid loading the PC supply? PJ

The power supply won't give a hoot, it can supply a ton of current on the 5v rail. A shorted or otherwise misbehaving USB device (or your motherboard) would go up in smoke long before the PC's power supply was overloaded.

The motherboard would likely shut down the port to prevent damage though, or the USB port's fuse would blow even before that happened.