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View Full Version : OK Brain picking time for Computer Build



Clod
05-05-2013, 08:08 PM
I know I asked about trade me before but I thought how about build my own. This is just a home computer mostly internet and hd video playing with the odd game possible if its up to it. Please give me your opinions on the following -
Antec GX700 Case - putting this first as I like the looks so want to be sure everything else is right for it.

Intel i5 3570K ivy bridge 3.4 Ghz 6mb 77w LGA1175

Gigabyte GA Z77 D3H Intel Z77 ivy bridge or Asus P8Z77 V LX IntelZ77

Kingstone Hyper X Beast 8gb DDR3-1 or Corsair CMZ8GGX3M2A 1600 cab Vengance 2 X 4 GB

Seagate Barracuda ST2000 M001 64 Sata 3

Videocard- Gigabyte GV-N65TOC-2GI Ge force GTX650 Ti overclocked 2GB or possibly the overclocked 2GB GDDR5 version

CD player Asus DRW-24 Green

PSU - This I'm not sure about as I don't know what a reliable make is these days or what power to get (500w ?). I've had an Antec 500 running happily in my present computer for the last 7yrs but it took 2 dud Raidmaxs to get there. So I'm open to suggestions on this.

Was also thinking of getting a 120GB Solid State Drive for the operating system but I realise thats probably overkill.

Operating system - Windows 8 purely cos my present is XP so thought it would be an idea to get the latest.

Basically I'd like it to last a wee while before having to update things. I realise theres more expensive and powerful video cards but dont know if it would be worth it that said I could always borrow my daughters games and have a go. So feel free to put me on the right course . Cheers.

Ps- hope I haven't missed out too many letters on the components so you know what ones I'm talking about.

Iantech
05-05-2013, 09:37 PM
Sounds pretty good. If it was my build, I would be selecting a PSU of 650w minimum. Several good makes of PSU, I generally run with Enermax or Silverstone because thats what my supplier stocks and havent had any issues with them to date. Good luck with the build, you will like the result.

About your SSD thoughts..... personally, I think a SATA SSD or even a mSATA SSD is a great idea as a cache drive but after seeing and hearing of so many solid state storage devices becoming corrupt and becoming unreadable, I am hessitant to depend on one to install an OS on. Access speed is dramically increased with a SSD cache drive, my Win 7 system from power on to ready to use is about 16~19 seconds which I am happy with.

dugimodo
06-05-2013, 04:18 AM
All good choices. PSU brands with good reputations are corsair, seasonic, antec, silverstone. 500W is enough but if you think you might ever want to run a more powerful graphics card it's cheaper in the long run to buy one with a bit more headroom.

Myth
06-05-2013, 07:34 AM
+ 1 for Enermax or Corsair PSU's. Haven't really had any dealings with the other recommended brands

550W + would do

For case tidiness, you may want to go with a modular PSU as well - cuts down on the number of cables

McRuff
06-05-2013, 11:17 AM
About your SSD thoughts..... personally, I think a SATA SSD or even a mSATA SSD is a great idea as a cache drive but after seeing and hearing of so many solid state storage devices becoming corrupt and becoming unreadable, I am hessitant to depend on one to install an OS on. Access speed is dramically increased with a SSD cache drive, my Win 7 system from power on to ready to use is about 16~19 seconds which I am happy with.

In my opinion, get a SSD for your boot drive but as with any boot hard drive, make sure you regularly do a Drive Image and keep your Data backed up

Chilling_Silence
06-05-2013, 11:28 AM
+1 for getting a SSD, well worth the investment!

I'd suggest a 500-550w PSU should be more than ample too :-)

kingdragonfly
06-05-2013, 02:47 PM
You can calculate your power supply needs using this web page

http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

Too few watts means PC may be flaky, or you are limited in upgrading your video card.

Power supply manufacturers tends to rate the power output when using 120 VAC, so they're usually able to produce more watts outside the US.

Too many watts may be a hotter / more noisy / less "green" power supply.

As noted on website "When used heavily or over an extended period of time (1+ years) a power supply will slowly lose some of its initial wattage capacity. We recommend you add 10-20% if you plan to keep your PSU for more than 1 year, or 20-30% for 24/7 usage and 1+ years."

Clod
06-05-2013, 09:22 PM
Thanks folks, your thoughts are much appreciated.

PPp
07-05-2013, 10:06 PM
It probably a bit over the top as far as Internet and video playing are concerned, so it just the caliber of the games you may want to play that would be the limiting factor.