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View Full Version : How to partition a new hard drive for Windows 7 installation



undiejuice
07-01-2013, 03:26 AM
Hiya,

I'm stuck trying to understand what it is that I want to achieve using the Windows 7 custom installation setup proceedure for creating partitions.

When installing Windows for the first time using previous windows editions like 98, 2000 and XP, it was much easier to create partitions simply by entering the size you want and then it's done. Secondly, if I wanted to create additional partitions, previous versions of Windows would allow me to do this really simple. Overall, the process was pretty straight forward. The strange thing now is, when I am doing a custom installation method, with a disk which has no partitions at all for a new Windows installation, any value I enter higher than , than 10 gb (10000 mbs), is seen by Windows 7 as 100mb instead. I have also tried entering a value higher than 10 like, 12 gb, 15, gb and 20 gb, and still the same result.

Furthermore, if i keep creating more partitions, windows 7 installation will see it as another primary partition, rather than a logical drive or an extended partition.

So how do I resolve this?

Cheers.

Note: All I want are three partitions 100gbs and above for:
--------------------------------------------------------
Windows 100 gb
apps 100 gb
accounts 120 gb

I am also doing a full installation; not an upgrade.

Frank_sumbody
07-01-2013, 07:10 AM
WARNING: I hope I have worded this correctly

I have been a great fan of partition in the windows 95, 98 days, while others claimed it would slow down their computer, if someone did it, they would just divide the hard drive size by how many partitions they wanted. Back in the windows 98 days I came out wining by my practice, my computer got a virus and I could not turn the computer on. so I just had to reformat just that one windows operating partition and all my work on other partitions never got destroyed.

Personally I think mathematics should be brought into it, however with WXYZ Tera Byte hard drives and 1024? FAT systems coming up soon, my theory and practice is quickly loosing steam.

I would work out how big the minimum file cluster size would be to say a text file containing just a few bytes of information and work it out from that. What is the point in making a "odd" size when if you make just below a multiple of 2, for example why would you make a partition 1100,000,000 bytes when you could make it 1000,00,00 and save half hard drive space when you go to save a small file when 1073,741,824 is a multiple of 2

I can not remember the figures now, so might need other member guidance, But I would make a small (or left over size) partition for small text files and a much larger partition for large pictures and big program files for say when I download OpenOffice that takes about 132 Mega Bytes.

wainuitech
07-01-2013, 09:08 AM
What would be a lot easier, and certainly a lot less hassle is with the drive completely empty, install windows on the complete drive, then using either third party partition software or use the inbuilt partition software in Windows 7 to shrink the main partition to the size you want and create separate ones in the space thats left after its installed.

Windows 7 by default creates a hidden partition of around 200 - 300 MB at the beginning of the drive, this contains boot info, as well as repair options.

You can of course also use diskpart to manually create the partitions (this is built into Windows & the Install DVD) its all command prompt so you need to know the commands, then assign drive letters etc.

FoxyMX
07-01-2013, 09:26 AM
Great advice wainuitech. Is it still common practice to partition hard drives these days or don't people bother now? As has been said above, it was common and recommended in the days of Win XP and prior.

I would be wanting to have one partition for the OS and another for data but do people bother these days to keep their data on multiple partitions? Huge unpartitioned hard drives would take forever to scan and defrag wouldn't they?

gary67
07-01-2013, 10:02 AM
All of mine are partitioned and will continue to be so in the foreseeable future

Speedy Gonzales
07-01-2013, 10:21 AM
Same here. I've got 4 partitions. 3 are near 200 GB each the 4th is the largest. 2 are near empty, one is for the OS, the other is for programs / updates I've downloaded. That way, if I have to format or if I want to install another OS besides windows, I can put it on E or F. Or reinstall windows on C

undiejuice
07-01-2013, 11:04 AM
WARNING: I hope I have worded this correctly

I have been a great fan of partition in the windows 95, 98 days, while others claimed it would slow down their computer, if someone did it, they would just divide the hard drive size by how many partitions they wanted. Back in the windows 98 days I came out wining by my practice, my computer got a virus and I could not turn the computer on. so I just had to reformat just that one windows operating partition and all my work on other partitions never got destroyed.

Personally I think mathematics should be brought into it, however with WXYZ Tera Byte hard drives and 1024? FAT systems coming up soon, my theory and practice is quickly loosing steam.

I would work out how big the minimum file cluster size would be to say a text file containing just a few bytes of information and work it out from that. What is the point in making a "odd" size when if you make just below a multiple of 2, for example why would you make a partition 1100,000,000 bytes when you could make it 1000,00,00 and save half hard drive space when you go to save a small file when 1073,741,824 is a multiple of 2

I can not remember the figures now, so might need other member guidance, But I would make a small (or left over size) partition for small text files and a much larger partition for large pictures and big program files for say when I download OpenOffice that takes about 132 Mega Bytes.

LMAO, there is one in the family. I don't know if someone is having a "go" at me, or they are still grieving over their christmas gift.
Thanks for the tip. :)

undiejuice
07-01-2013, 11:16 AM
What would be a lot easier, and certainly a lot less hassle is with the drive completely empty, install windows on the complete drive, then using either third party partition software or use the inbuilt partition software in Windows 7 to shrink the main partition to the size you want and create separate ones in the space thats left after its installed.

Windows 7 by default creates a hidden partition of around 200 - 300 MB at the beginning of the drive, this contains boot info, as well as repair options.

You can of course also use diskpart to manually create the partitions (this is built into Windows & the Install DVD) its all command prompt so you need to know the commands, then assign drive letters etc.

Hi WainuiTech,

I see now, why windows 7 was trying to create this partition. It seems like a total waste and I didn't know it would be hidden too. I have looked at your method to use, but I may leave this one as a last result for now. I might try something else, if all fails use the one you suggested. Oh by the way, I remember "disk part" application for creating a Windows 7 USB installation method, which is what I am doing now but I am not as confident. Anyway, the harddisk is completely empty, so I can play around I guess.

Thanks.

undiejuice
07-01-2013, 11:26 AM
Same here. I've got 4 partitions. 3 are near 200 GB each the 4th is the largest. 2 are near empty, one is for the OS, the other is for programs / updates I've downloaded. That way, if I have to format or if I want to install another OS besides windows, I can put it on E or F. Or reinstall windows on C

Re: FoxyMx, Gary67,

Am I reading this correctly? No one bothers to partition their hard drives any more? I do it for the same reasons mentioned by FoxyMx and Speedy because the fact that a "huge unpartitioned/partitioned hard drive would take forever to scan," and if I need to reformat windows, I only need to worry about C drive, while my user accounts on E drive still remain intact and unaffected by the reinstallation. (Aside for the minor tweaks I need to do) and at least it saves my job having to backup the user accounts, time and time again.

Speedy, I thought 100gb was enough for each partiton for me, since this is a new drive. By the sounds of it, yours has grown over time. I hope by this time, hard drive prices will come down a little more to compenstate extra storage space.

Thanks :)

Cheers.

Speedy Gonzales
07-01-2013, 11:32 AM
Its a 1 TB hdd. And you can only put so many partitions on it / on a hdd. So I had to make them bigger, so I wouldn't waste any of the hdd. I think if you want more partitions, you have to change it to GPT.

Which most versions of windows don't support / you cant boot from it. Unless you're using a version of windows server, with a 64-bit Itanium-based system.. Both of which, I don't have or need. Or 64-bit versions of Vista / Win7 / Server on a UEFI-based system.

Frank_sumbody
07-01-2013, 12:26 PM
LMAO, there is one in the family. I don't know if someone is having a "go" at me, or they are still grieving over their christmas gift.
Thanks for the tip. :)

THANKS FOR THAT YOUR NAME HAS JUST BEEN ADDED TO MY OTHER LIST OF GROWING NAME I WILL NEVER HELP AGAIN, IT TOOK A LOT OF TIME TO WRITE JUST SO i COULD WASTE MY TIME HELPING PEOPLE LIKE YOU

gary67
07-01-2013, 04:08 PM
I always partition drives if using a single physical drive, just in this computer I added a second drive since my C partition was getting full and moved my D to the new drive

Chilling_Silence
07-01-2013, 05:07 PM
THANKS FOR THAT YOUR NAME HAS JUST BEEN ADDED TO MY OTHER LIST OF GROWING NAME I WILL NEVER HELP AGAIN, IT TOOK A LOT OF TIME TO WRITE JUST SO i COULD WASTE MY TIME HELPING PEOPLE LIKE YOU

Grow up and get over yourself.

The user said thanks, I don't see what your problem is.