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Richard
22-12-2012, 05:37 PM
Why do people keep mispronouncing the word 'kilometre' by putting an 'om' in the middle of it. The correct pronunciation is 'kill-o-meeta'.

Try to remember this.

Driftwood
22-12-2012, 05:58 PM
Is that the worst example you could think of?

Richard
22-12-2012, 06:04 PM
Yep. Can't be too controversial with Christmas nearly here. :)

Driftwood
22-12-2012, 06:07 PM
Havent you got anything else to do?

Iantech
22-12-2012, 06:08 PM
Who says thats collect some might say ki-lom-e-ter is correct.

Driftwood
22-12-2012, 06:09 PM
Gee how many have you had



Who says thats collect some might say ki-lom-e-ter is correct.

the_bogan
22-12-2012, 06:14 PM
Maybe they're saying the American version?

Time for you to correct wikipedia.

There are two common pronunciations for the word:

/ˈkɪlɵmiːtər/ KIL-o-mee-tər and
/kɨˈlɒmɨtər/ ki-LOM-i-tər

R2x1
22-12-2012, 06:33 PM
Ki-LOM-i-tar is a simple abbreviation for "I haven't got a clue what I'm saying, but you must defend my absolute right to say it".

Zippity
22-12-2012, 06:43 PM
Are ewe sure it is knot key-low-meter?

Driftwood
22-12-2012, 06:58 PM
Never had this problem when we used miles.

Terry Porritt
22-12-2012, 06:59 PM
Maybe they're saying the American version?

Time for you to correct wikipedia.

There are two common pronunciations for the word:

/ˈkɪlɵmiːtər/ KIL-o-mee-tər and
/kɨˈlɒmɨtər/ ki-LOM-i-tər

But...only one is correct.

Then we have a micrOMeter...http://www.technologystudent.com/equip1/microm1.htm

and then also that tiny length a micro-metre, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micrometre

However you would think that weather reporters would get the correct pronunciation, after all they could be said to be semi scientific and know what a kilo- is and what a metre is.

Then again they talk of hot and cold temperatures, well temperature is just a scale and the numbers on that scale are neither hot nor cold. We know what they mean but that doesn't make it correct to talk of hot or cold temperatures.

The long gone pedant Graham Lees would have known what I'm talking about :)

the_bogan
22-12-2012, 07:05 PM
Terry, reading your post then mine then yours again, made me think, Is a word still the same word even tough it's spelt differently?

Terry Porritt
22-12-2012, 07:22 PM
Terry, reading your post then mine then yours again, made me think, Is a word still the same word even tough it's spelt differently?

I'm not sure I follow you.
Take the words meter/metre, depends on the language, French, German, American. The beauty of English English is that the difference in meaning between the same sounding words is clear.

The Americans have a problem, the Germans and French don't as a different word is used for a meter meaning a measuring instrument.

prefect
22-12-2012, 07:23 PM
I pronounce it kilo meter. My pet hate is the exaggerated pronunciation of maoris names. I pronounce maoris names like they have done for a hundred and fifty years phonetically. One day one of my kids pronounced muriwai differently so he got punished.

Richard
22-12-2012, 07:26 PM
Absolutely correct Terry. Nobody says 'mill-im-eta' or 'cent-im-eta' do they. Do they??

Terry Porritt
22-12-2012, 07:28 PM
Absolutely correct Terry. Nobody says 'mill-im-eta' or 'cent-im-eta' do they. Do they??

Absolutely anything is possible these days .................................................. ..........

decibel
22-12-2012, 07:28 PM
Absolutely correct Terry. Nobody says 'mill-im-eta' or 'cent-im-eta' do they. Do they??

And nobody says "Kil-log-ram"

paulw
22-12-2012, 07:40 PM
Why do people keep mispronouncing the word 'kilometre' by putting an 'om' in the middle of it.

Try to remember this.

It must be a no new nite on Press F1.

I pronounce it that way so it must be correct..

Zippity
22-12-2012, 07:42 PM
Oh-arm-a-roo :)

Frank_sumbody
22-12-2012, 07:51 PM
Why do people keep mispronouncing the word 'kilometre' by putting an 'om' in the middle of it. The correct pronunciation is 'kill-o-meeta'.

Try to remember this.

Have you have been watching the sloppy news readers lately?

This is what I think, remember if you can not beat them join the club go into the butcher and say "I would like 2 Kil-om-grams of lamb." you might have to practice it a few times to get it to sound right similar to the distance measurement sounding.

Then we can all join the "speaking prop-ly" club

zqwerty
22-12-2012, 08:23 PM
Contro-versy rather than con-troversy

prefect
22-12-2012, 08:24 PM
Oh-arm-a-roo :)
Yep since 1850 om a roo

ChazTheGeek
22-12-2012, 08:32 PM
Aye guys haf ow about this one: free=3. I hate how people can't say "th" properly!

pctek
22-12-2012, 09:03 PM
Kill o meter.
I hate cervical pronounced serve-i-kill
It's not. It's serve-ickal, Think magical.....

And the worst hate of all is concerning, as in They found the earthquake concerning.
Concerning means about.
They mean they found the earthquake of concern. Or were concerned.

Zippity
22-12-2012, 09:08 PM
Con-grad-u-late as a lot of Ameicans say :(

Iantech
22-12-2012, 09:46 PM
Gee how many have you hadThat was a cock up wasnt it. :D how correct become collect when the "R" and "L" are a kil-o-met-ah apart is beyond me :D
lmao

Zippity
22-12-2012, 11:22 PM
"Moving forward"

our reporters are "across it"

What the hell do either of those phrases mean? In plain English please :)

Bobh
22-12-2012, 11:57 PM
It's the government's fault for changing to metrics and giving us slightly bigger words to pronounce.

Just the Kiwi accent evolving I think.

zqwerty
23-12-2012, 07:20 AM
"Moving forward" - not stuck at a particular point or occurrence in time.

Never heard of the second one.

Zippity
23-12-2012, 08:34 AM
Never heard of the second one.

Watch TVOne news :(

Neil McC
23-12-2012, 08:46 AM
Everythink instead of everything!

WalOne
23-12-2012, 08:54 AM
"Jewelry" instead of "jewellery"

"Mischevious" (miss-chee-vee-us") instead of "mischevous"

Weather presenters using a pretentious (and strictly incorrect) "negative" temperature, instead of using "minus" or "below". Actually, make that "presenter" singular because there's only one idiot locally who does that (I know of).

News readers placing an incorrect emphasis on words, resulting in a totally different meaning. A classic example of this was when a newsreader was relating the events leading up to a brawl. Having given that background, she followed on with "the Police say ... " (should have been, "the Police say ... ")

Rant over

:sleep

Zippity
23-12-2012, 08:58 AM
Or the number of TV news reporters who begin every third sentence with the word "Now,"

Or the lead sports reporter on TVOne who places the emphasis on the last word of every sentence................

gary67
23-12-2012, 09:15 AM
Petrol and diesel vehicle drivers who think they and they alone should be allowed to use the roads

Cicero
23-12-2012, 09:22 AM
Woman for Wimin

He come up from Dunedin

dugimodo
23-12-2012, 10:06 AM
I hate when people have a phrase or word completely wrong because they have misunderstood what they hear.
Using "of" instead of "have" is a common one and makes no sense when you look at it. Just because contractions like "must've" (must have) sound like "must of" which is nonsensical.

Things like "for all intensive purposes", "with all do respect", etc. Easy to miss in conversation but glaringly obvious when written down.

kenj
23-12-2012, 10:10 AM
What a sad bunch you lot are today. :lol:

Mary Xmas to all Youse Fellas and Fellesses :banana

Hope I got the speling and pranuceation rite.

PS the "Youse" was to remember our old friend Surfer Joe... Hi Joe

Cicero
23-12-2012, 10:17 AM
What a sad bunch you lot are today. :lol:

Mary Xmas to all Youse Fellas and Fellesses :banana

Hope I got the speling and pranuceation rite.

PS the "Youse" was to remember our old friend Surfer Joe... Hi Joe

Is Joe still with us?

Lots can't say how and now !

zqwerty
23-12-2012, 10:39 AM
I very rarely watch any other news except TV1 News and I have never heard this expression.

WalOne
23-12-2012, 10:50 AM
I hate it when people say they'll speak "with" someone, rather than "to". "With" essentially means at the same time...

Especially telephone receptionists that add insult to injury with grammatical error "Good morning, you're speaking with Sweet Fanny, how can I assist you today?"

Grrr

Cicero
23-12-2012, 10:58 AM
I hate it when people say they'll speak "with" someone, rather than "to". "With" essentially means at the same time...

Especially telephone receptionists that add insult to injury with grammatical error "Good morning, you're speaking with Sweet Fanny, how can I assist you today?"

Grrr

I have never heard one speak?

prefect
23-12-2012, 11:26 AM
I have never heard one speak?
There was a porn movie where one spoke

Cicero
23-12-2012, 11:57 AM
There was a porn movie where one spoke

Anything interesting?

prefect
23-12-2012, 12:15 PM
1977 movie called chatterbox.
:stare:

Richard
23-12-2012, 12:23 PM
Whatever. Like.

Cicero
23-12-2012, 12:40 PM
1977 movie called chatterbox.
:stare:

I meant, did it say owt interesting?

Iantech
23-12-2012, 01:07 PM
Those NZ police TV shows when they say "Cunstable" instead of Constable is one of the worst.

Bobh
23-12-2012, 01:32 PM
Those NZ police TV shows when they say "Cunstable" instead of Constable is one of the worst.
You would expect this on an Australian Police TV show but surely not on an NZ Police TV show.

prefect
23-12-2012, 01:55 PM
Yolo

Zippity
23-12-2012, 02:13 PM
I very rarely watch any other news except TV1 News and I have never heard this expression.

It was used on Friday night :(


And "moving forward" is now being used instead of "in the future......" or "next time............."

pctek
23-12-2012, 03:22 PM
"the Police say ... ")


They do, annoyingly.
They say "the female at x location", or "the male over there".
The female what? Giraffe? Iguana?

Something wrong with saying man or woman? Or boy or girl?

Richard
23-12-2012, 03:50 PM
And 'less' when they mean 'fewer' Such as "There were less people on the bus today." Less is for quantity, fewer is for number.

dugimodo
23-12-2012, 07:51 PM
And 'less' when they mean 'fewer' Such as "There were less people on the bus today." Less is for quantity, fewer is for number.

I'm not with you there, you could accurately say "there was a smaller quantity of people on the bus today" The two seem interchangeable to me in this applictaion.
Or to put it another way, the number of people on the bus IS a quantity. Fewer = less than surely?

WalOne
23-12-2012, 08:04 PM
Oxford Dictionary:

Less' or 'fewer'?



People often donít know when to use less and when to use fewer in a sentence. Hereís how to get it right.

Use fewer if youíre referring to people or things in the plural (e.g. houses, newspapers, dogs, students, children). For example:

People these days are buying fewer newspapers.
Fewer students are opting to study science-related subjects.
Fewer than thirty children each year develop the disease.

Use less when youíre referring to something that canít be counted or doesnít have a plural (e.g. money, air, time, music, rain). For example:

Itís a better job but they pay you less money.
People want to spend less time in traffic jams.
Ironically, when Iím on tour, I listen to less music.

Less is also used with numbers when they are on their own and with expressions of measurement or time, e.g.:

His weight fell from 18 stone to less than 12.
Their marriage lasted less than two years.
Heath Square is less than four miles away from Dublin city centre

QW.
23-12-2012, 10:10 PM
Some of those weather presenters on TV1 annoy me. They pronounce Timaru as tee maru and Taupo as tor por.

gradebdan
24-12-2012, 08:14 PM
When I came to NZ 40years ago it took me a while to realise
that "Thats it over there eh" (EH is pronounced A) meant "is that it
over there?" Another one, Why is not "mine" used instead of "my one"?

Frank_sumbody
24-12-2012, 09:29 PM
I was watching TV1 news tonight until some toss header said "across the ditch", screwed up toss header needs some basic education I learned at primary school. So then I switched over to TV3 news

wmoore
24-12-2012, 09:43 PM
The Grammar Nazi Here (http://youtu.be/c3y0CD2CoCs)

user
25-12-2012, 08:07 AM
Hilary Barry saying 'twenny' instead of 'twenty'.

Bobh
25-12-2012, 08:08 AM
Whom would like him for a boss?

prefect
25-12-2012, 08:56 AM
Police saying they wont comment about a violent crime, then a few days later asking the public to help.

Cicero
25-12-2012, 09:02 AM
Using the word more when not necessary, example,

A lot more crisper.

Gobe1
25-12-2012, 09:24 AM
Gee how many have you had

:lol:

Frank_sumbody
25-12-2012, 09:39 AM
How about "80 years young" to replace the 80 years OLD, Sounds like everyone is brain-dead and can not work out when you get to about 80 you dont get old you get younger or something.

Why not just say "80 years of age" and stop the crap

Agent_24
25-12-2012, 12:24 PM
What about when people say "Axed" instead of "Asked" ?

Richard
25-12-2012, 04:26 PM
I also hate 'for free'. Why not just say 'free' or 'for nothing'. Such as ' his advice was offered (for) free'. GRRRRRR!

Frank_sumbody
25-12-2012, 05:10 PM
weather whingers especially those who whing about the weather as they are giving it out on radio & TV

WalOne
25-12-2012, 05:24 PM
People who make abstruse comments, then post without the courtesy of performing a simple spelling or grammar check first ...

R2x1
26-12-2012, 10:54 PM
Please make allowances for the full moon. ;)