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View Full Version : Can I use an older PC case with newer systems?



undiejuice
20-12-2012, 10:39 PM
Hi.
I know it might sound dumb, but I have an older PC case I wish to keep using. I still like it because it is strong and sturdy, heavy, nothing like the cheap aluminium type (where you can bend it almost with your hands ), it is still in good nick. However, if I keep this PC Case do you believe I may encounter heating issues as a result if I don't upgrade to modern PC cases for modern up to date systems that cater for keeping my computer well ventilated?

Cheers.

Computer Case: PROCASE model (1997) approx
PSU: 750 watts
Motherboard: GA-B75M-D3H
Processor: Intel Pentium Dual Core G645 2.90GHz processor.

Slankydudl
20-12-2012, 10:49 PM
Only problem i can think of is motherboard being different

wainuitech
20-12-2012, 10:51 PM
No real reason why you cant. The only thing you have to check is the motherboard risers that screw into the case are the same locations as the board. Some older boards have risers where a newer one wont. Remove or change them to suit.

Agent_24
20-12-2012, 11:34 PM
Should be no issues regarding the hardware physically fitting (except as already stated - motherboards don't always have the same mounting hole layout) but depending on how old it is, the airflow might not be up to it for newer hardware. Some modifications might be a good idea to get the best cooling.

Slankydudl
20-12-2012, 11:45 PM
Considering how much more sensitive to heat modern computer tech is its probably a good idea to vamp up the cooling a bit.

pctek
21-12-2012, 06:49 AM
I have an older PC case I wish to keep using. However, if I keep this PC Case do you believe I may encounter heating issues .
Cases are cases. It really doesn't matter.
You use whatever you like.
It's one thing I don't upgrade often in my PCs.

No reason there should be heat issues...if there is, add another case fan.

They are pretty much all designed the same, the only thing I ever come across, is high end GPUs being able to fit into a case.

That was the main reason for my last case change.

gary67
21-12-2012, 08:21 AM
I use an old case for my file server and drilled a pattern of holes in the side. All my desktops run in old cases I'm too mean to waste money on a case

Nomad
21-12-2012, 08:32 AM
We used a 1992 for our 1997 computer b/c the motherboard was a AT/ATX design. So the AT case worked :D
But isn't the newer cases fits the same motherboards as 1997 which was about when ATX kicked off ...

A case is a case, I have a Antec case bought in 2009 with the PSU. Heavier than the cheapies but all it gave me was a rear case fan LOL.

Agent_24
21-12-2012, 10:07 AM
For my main machine I've been using the same old case since my first build, but I've cut a hole and added a fan on the side (never had one) and cut out the useless stamped fan grille on the rear which seriously impeded airflow and replaced it with a wire one.

Just make sure you have enough fans blowing in so you don't end up with negative air pressure inside the case. If you do, you'll be in dust bunny hell.

Iantech
21-12-2012, 10:21 AM
Depends on what you are putting inside it. Some of the older cases with the power supply at the top can have location issues with full ATX boards as well as issues with some graphic card length as already mentioned. Air flow can be an issue and temps should be monitored.

Post a few pics of the case or let us know what make and model it is so it can be looked up if you have concerns.

My suggestion would be not to skimp on a case to save a few dollars now, it may cost you more if you have failure due to over-heating, or components shorting against the case for example.

Have to disagree with those saying "cases are cases", the cooler you can keep things the better. Some components are susceptible to temporary malfunction or permanent failure if overheated such as integrated circuits as in CPUs, chipset, graphics cards, and hard disk drives.

Just building a top end LGA2011 system for a client as the moment (waiting on a few items to come into stock before I can finish it). The case was given as much thought as rest of the system.

Pic: Standard size mid-tower case at right. Left is a Coolermaster HAF-X XL Tower.

dugimodo
22-12-2012, 07:30 PM
You can do it if you want to, a friend of mine has kept the same beige box for years and built gaming machines in it (well I build them for him in it) - no front USB, no case fan, PSU mounted sideways over top of where the CPU sits, sitting on the carpet and never cleaned, never had a hardware failure..... Until recently I gave him one of my cheap old cases, couldn't look at that dinosaur any more.

But you can buy a reasonable mid tower case for $100 or less that will have a 12 CM fan or maybe severa , front USB, modern design, etc so I'd do that personally. To get a front USB 3.0 adapter for a 3.5" bay costs around $40 for a branded one which is almost half the cost of a basic case that has it built in, just saying.

undiejuice
23-12-2012, 07:26 PM
Hello!

Thanks everyone for your awesome feedback.

I have taken onboard your comments and there have been some interesting points mentioned like: front usb 3.0 adapter, since my case never came with one at the time of purchase, adding an aditional case fan, and keeping an eye out for motherboard dimension size and screw placements, and ditching the idea for a new pc case. My previous motherboard was an ATX Gigabyte GA-8SG800 Motherboard which I had used for a number of years.

Photo2 shows a 2nd hand motherboard I bought 8months ago, and is roughly the same size as the new motherboard i have now. If I am right, these new motherboards are getting smaller and might fit this PC case after all?

Photo 2 shows A, B AND M. I don't know if these markings imply for the motherboard placement perhaps. If you're going to tell me off about missing screws, I just ran of bigger ones to hold it in.

Merry Christmas by the way.
Cheers.

p.s. I have to admit, I realize now, I didn't stick to using the same motherboard for approx 14 years as I earlier stated. I forgot that over the years, I did do some minor upgrades in the past, but the pentium 486 processor has been my only one I have used since buying brand new until now.

4612461346144615

Agent_24
23-12-2012, 07:40 PM
That case doesn't look too bad, certainly has enough space for long video cards!

It would be advisable to put a fan on that rear grille though at the very least.

Greven
23-12-2012, 07:41 PM
The A, B and M markings are markings for where risers are required for several different form factor motherboards. There is probably another set of markers for micro-ATX too.

mikebartnz
24-12-2012, 11:50 AM
I use an old case for my file server and drilled a pattern of holes in the side.
You have to be careful doing that kind of thing as you can totally ruin the proper airflow.
There was a tech in Masterton that had the habbit of taking off the dummy PCI covers to help the airflow but by doing that he was removing the airflow from where it was needed across the CPU.

undiejuice
24-12-2012, 12:45 PM
Hi Agent_24,

I aggree too. I will look for a fan to fit this pc case. Cheers.

undiejuice
24-12-2012, 12:46 PM
The A, B and M markings are markings for where risers are required for several different form factor motherboards. There is probably another set of markers for micro-ATX too.

I see. Thanks. :)

PENTIUM
27-12-2012, 04:01 PM
Nobody seems to have noted the board in question is a micro ATX.
The only query I would have is, does your existing case and P/S have a connector for the 8pin 12volt feed and for front panel sound.
I am waiting on a CPU delivery to put one of these motherboards into an existing sturdy midi-tower; but with a new 500-w P/S.

pctek
27-12-2012, 05:11 PM
Motherboards come in two main sizes.....ATX or mATX. mATX have less bits, like 2 ram slots versus 4 for instance.
mATX is fine but if your case was designed for mATX and you want ATX, then it may be too small.

gary67
27-12-2012, 08:27 PM
You have to be careful doing that kind of thing as you can totally ruin the proper airflow.
There was a tech in Masterton that had the habbit of taking off the dummy PCI covers to help the airflow but by doing that he was removing the airflow from where it was needed across the CPU.

It improved it, but then I got given a better case with more room for all the extra hard drives so that drilled out case became obsolete. But it still worked fine

mikebartnz
27-12-2012, 08:45 PM
It improved it, but then I got given a better case with more room for all the extra hard drives so that drilled out case became obsolete. But it still worked fine I'm not saying it won't, just that you need to be careful how you do it.