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View Full Version : Dell XPS 8500 - decent system? Alternatives?



annie
21-11-2012, 04:47 PM
Dell have a bit of a sale on at the moment, including on the XPS 8500. We're due for a new computer, and it looks pretty good to me. The worst we would use on it currently is Lightroom 3, Photoshop CS5 and Age of Empires III. Current price is $2660.

Specs:
Processor: 3rd Generation IntelŽ CoreTM i7-3770 processor (3.40 GHz with Turbo Boost 2.0 up to 3.90 GHz)

Operating System: Windows 8, English (64bit)

Memory: 16GB2 Dual Channel DDR3 SDRAM at 1600MHz
Video Card: NVIDIAŽ GeForceŽ GTX 660 1.5GB GDDR5
Optical Drive: Blu-ray Combo Drive (BD-R, DVD+/-RW), Write to CD/DVD

Hard Drive: 256GB SSD+2TB SATA Hard Drive 7200 RPM

I quite like Dells, they come with a little instruction book on how to update the innards, which means that I can easily maintain them myself. We've had 3 others over the last 15 years, and they've lasted pretty well. This looks an ok system to me, though ideally I'd prefer an Invidia GTX 660 Ti, an extra 500 or so is too much to pay for the advantage.


Does anyone have any better suggestions? Price is, as always, an issue.

Thanks for yr advice

Annie

wratterus
21-11-2012, 05:23 PM
I wouldn't touch a dell with a 40ft barge pole. Weird propriety layouts and cabling, cheap components, poor warranties.

Was $2660 including a screen etc or was that just the box?

annie
21-11-2012, 05:36 PM
Just the box. And I realise the components are on the cheap side, but I've rarely had a problem with them - had to replace a PSU once, and had a hard drive fail after 5 years on another, had to put a bit more RAM in one, but that was it.

I'm not an IT tech, so am pretty weak on assessing components and build. Do you have any suggestions for a better system?
Thanks

Chilling_Silence
21-11-2012, 06:09 PM
So why do you need such an overpowered system for CS5 / AoE3?

annie
21-11-2012, 06:28 PM
I have found that systems with good initial specs tend to be useful longer - also we do occasionally set up a lan for gaming. So while gaming isn't a primary use, it does happen occasionally.

mikebartnz
21-11-2012, 08:47 PM
Just the box. And I realise the components are on the cheap side, but I've rarely had a problem with them - had to replace a PSU once, and had a hard drive fail after 5 years on another, had to put a bit more RAM in one, but that was it.

I'm not an IT tech, so am pretty weak on assessing components and build. Do you have any suggestions for a better system?
Thanks
Why don't you contact Wainuitech and get him to build one for you.

stratex5
21-11-2012, 10:33 PM
Or even go to the computerlounge pcbuild help forum.

pctek
22-11-2012, 07:14 AM
I have found that systems with good initial specs tend to be useful longer

I find good quality parts make them useful for longer.
Dell - well, they most likely don't list whats in it and the warranty is rubbish too.

Computer Lounge or Wainuitech.

annie
22-11-2012, 09:29 AM
Mike, stratex, pctek -

Thanks for your helpful replies, excellent idea and I will do that. I hadn't thought of someone like Wainuitech, and didn't know about Computerlounge. I'll start researching components and try to get something that will easily handle a large Lightroom library. But next week, rest of this week is dedicated to producing the creepiest vilest zombie birthday cake I can.

Thanks again, appreciate it.

1101
22-11-2012, 09:50 AM
I wouldn't touch a dell with a 40ft barge pole. Weird propriety layouts and cabling, cheap components, poor warranties...


+1

I would add, hard to deal with for parts & warranties . Ive been on hold for 30minutes dealing with Dell in the past. Much much longer than other PC Brands warranty support. So bad we used to get dell customers asking(ie paying) us to organise Dell warranty repairs as they had only frustrations with Dell support (& the wait)
Also, any company that REFUSES to tell you who the official repair NZ agent is for out of warranty repairs should be avoided

my 2c
HP Business Class PC's have proven to be very reliable overall, often with next day onsite warranties
(NOT the HP home PC's from Dick Smith etc)
++ Avoid small form factor PC's. Get a mid size/full size tower , not some mini case that you may not be able to get replacement power supplies for.

wratterus
22-11-2012, 11:20 AM
Have a look a ComputerLounge, they have a 'pc builder' option on the right hand side of the home page. Or get a local PC builder to build you one. Wainuitech is close to you, and he's top notch. ;)

annie
25-11-2012, 05:46 PM
Thank you everyone for the suggestions. I'll do my background research, run it past the other half, and then probably get one built.

wratterus
26-11-2012, 09:55 AM
Good to hear - to get something exactly the same spec level, you will pay a little more, but two things - you don't need something of that spec level, something with (for example) a slightly smaller processor will be more than enough, and you're going generally going to get more longevity out of a PC with good quality components, rather than a well spec'd (on paper) PC with cheap components. A huge processor isn't much help if the motherboard has died. :2cents: