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Nomad
17-09-2012, 11:24 AM
Hi with spring coming up ... how do you guys get a continual supply of vegetables? At a guess we might have 8 of 30cm x 80cm garden spaces.

Trying to grow tomatoes, maybe 2 of that for 4 plants? How much do they fruit?
Other stuff like lettuce etc .. if we consume 2 per week, that's 8 per month. Or 30 per month of bok choi, how does one manage that? We eat the centre part too so cannot just pick the outer leaves ...



Cheers.

KarameaDave
17-09-2012, 11:31 AM
Google up succession planting, get a good gardeners calender (some plant according to lunar phases).
No one can tell how many Toms you will get...it will depend on many variables.
One older method of working it out was the square foot garden...just convert to approx metrics.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_foot_gardening
Good luck and happy gardening (I take it you are not as nomadic as your name suggests)

user
17-09-2012, 11:44 AM
We keep some veges available all summer by planting a few every so often eg 2-3 caulis every few weeks, short rows of carrots every month. Check on the web when veges can be planted in NZ and use that as a basis for what to plant. Some veges have a short season but with the use of a freezer, you can store them and use them many months later. We are just running out of beans from the previous summer. We used the last of the leeks yesterday but still have some as soup in the freezer.

It sounds like you need more garden space than you have to grow most of your requirements. We convert lawn into garden if we run short of space (not always an option for many).

gary67
17-09-2012, 12:47 PM
Last year by prolific use of our freezer. This year is going to be a problem we rented our house out in Nelson and moved into a rental here in Chch so only a few veg will be grown. Our Nelson house has no lawn it's all garden

pctek
17-09-2012, 12:58 PM
Hi with spring coming up ... how do you guys get a continual supply of vegetables?
Trying to grow tomatoes, maybe 2 of that for 4 plants? How much do they fruit?


By planting one or two things every couple of weeks or so - with things like lettuces, caulis etc.

Zucchini, cucumbers, pumpkins etc, the problem there is to dispose of the excess, you end up with them coming out your ears. 1 plant of each is sufficient.

Tomatoes, depends how you grow them. A lot of people cut off a lot of laterals, you'll get big fruit that way but less of them. let them sprawl and you'll get millions although smaller in size.

You get loads, we have 7 seeds in, that will be 5 too many really. But I may keep 4 plants, and make relish and sauce with the excess.

Beans - you get too many for 2 people for 1 year off 3 short rows, so we're cutting that back to 2 rows this year.

Depends on location but here in Auckland we are on to the 3 rd set of pea plants this year. First lot finished Jan - too hot really then. Harvested the last of the 2nd lot last month, and put in some more to finish before the really hot arrives.
We have had silverbeet all year - it's a weed, leave it alone and it just grows....

Nomad
17-09-2012, 01:35 PM
We are in Welly, we got the lettuce outside now, taking quite a while, we had them inside then transplanted outside been a good 3 weeks now I think, still not large size. We are trying with climbing beans now, just one strawberry plant and one lemon tree. With the boy choi's it's one plant per seed ... if we eat the stems as well .... Not sure what's happened to the spinach, they say it is a easy vege to grow. Been outside for some time still small as .. maybe 4 leaves total size of a mandarin :lol:

KarameaDave
17-09-2012, 01:46 PM
Plants grow slowly in cold soils, if you put a bit of windbreak around the patch it may help, otherwise invest in a cloche.

Nomad
17-09-2012, 02:17 PM
Would things like spinach, boy choi etc .. provide less crop :confused: That's one crop per seed right. Same with carrots right? Will look into the other stuffs mentioned.

We have over 10x broad imperial beans ...

KarameaDave
17-09-2012, 04:09 PM
Yes generally one seed one plant. Beetroot and silverbeet can have clustered seeds.
You could buy mesclun mix which is lettuce, rocket and other leafy herbs, it is grown fast
and cut when small, then will grow again, but they are only small salad leaves so a lot of seed needs to be sown.

pctek
17-09-2012, 06:08 PM
We are in Welly, we got the lettuce outside now, taking quite a while, we had them inside then transplanted outside been a good 3 weeks now I think, still not large size. We are trying with climbing beans now, just one strawberry plant and one lemon tree. With the boy choi's it's one plant per seed ... if we eat the stems as well .... Not sure what's happened to the spinach, they say it is a easy vege to grow. Been outside for some time still small as .. maybe 4 leaves total size of a mandarin :lol:

Ah. Cold.

It is a bit early, traditional planting time is Labour Weekend.


1 strawberry plant might give you 4 or 5 strawberries, but not to worry, let it grow babies, I started with 6 plants and in a year ended up with about 100.

Beans like it hot, it's too early.
Spinach or silverbeet? Spinach is harder. Silverbeet, being a weed, doesn't care much about conditions.

Nomad
17-09-2012, 06:27 PM
Hmm ... I have been reading the calendar guide for plants. They say spinach, bok choi and beans are a cooler type hence I planted them earlier.

This shows in June, broad beans for the cooler/mountain regions :annoyed:
http://www.gardengrow.co.nz/?month=6
Plus beans, spinach, bok choi is called "easy" haha.

Pctek - in your opinion what are the easier to grow vege's for crap climate place like Welly and probably crap soil too? I have bought a lot of compost b/c the dirt here can be quite hard or muddy.

KarameaDave
17-09-2012, 07:21 PM
Easiest vege to grow in this climate? Silverbeet.
Get some Gypsum, (Calcium Sulphate) it will help flocculate the clay particles in your soil, forming over time a better aerated crumb texture.
Use the compost too as that will help.
Another approach is to use a sheet mulch or no-dig method such as that in Esther Deans gardening book.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-dig_gardening