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kenj
13-07-2012, 09:28 AM
I am going in to Hawkes Bay Hospital for a new hip next Wednesday. I have Avascular Necrosis which the surgeon tells me is a bit different to Arthritis. Pretty rapid onset and it is only 4 weeks since my first consultation with him. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avascular_necrosis

'tis very painful and I am on crutches and use a wheelchair when one is available in stores.

Any of you had a new hip? What is it like after surgery? Positive comments please ;)

Ken :banana

stratex5
13-07-2012, 09:31 AM
Good luck on your operation:thumbs:

R.M.
13-07-2012, 09:32 AM
It's a great fix - you should do well! Initially some pain - but different and better than what you have had recently. You'll be out of bed walking pretty smartly (with some help). And onwards and upwards from there... :)

Trev
13-07-2012, 09:39 AM
I meet a guy on the Rotary pathway a couple of times a week who has had both hips done and he said it is much an improvement. He is 80.
Best of luck. Watch out for the wild nurses. Good hospital good food. I have been in there as a patient 3 times since 2009.
:)

Nick G
13-07-2012, 09:57 AM
Good luck with the op.

CliveM
13-07-2012, 10:02 AM
All the best Kenj. Got a couple of relatives with replacement hips and it makes a vast improvement to their lives. Beats hell out of how you are now comfort wise.

Clod
13-07-2012, 10:12 AM
I had that about 16 or more years ago. To try and get blood into both my left and right femors (might have that word wrong I mean the ball joint) the surgeon drilled holes to increase the blood supply. Its worked so far but he reckoned it might put off the hip replacement for about 20yrs so if I'm lucky I've got a few more years to go. Certainly way better than walking along and your leg wanting to give way under you. I was in the hip ward in Dunedin with people who actually had hip replacements done. Although there is pain at first they fill you up with pain killers so its not too bad. They all said it was way better than what they'd been thru before the hip op. Best of luck for your op and the best advice- order the large meals, the others were too small (strangely I loved the hospital food).

kenj
13-07-2012, 10:23 AM
Thanks for your positive comments. I was amazed how quick I am having this done. Went to a physio session with about 30 others yesterday, and during cuppa time found most had been crook for well over a year with arthritic hips. Most of them can still get about with no support reasonably well. I cannot move without crutches.

My problem started in January, not to bad, walking stick sometimes, mid March went on a cruise with one crutch, by May on two crutches, Dr referred me to surgeon beginning of June. Saw him mid June and here I am, about to have it done. The ball joint on the top of my femur has collapsed and my leg has shortened quite a bit.

All this makes me look forward to getting it done. As grandaughter says.... "we will all be shouting 'hip, hip, hooray' when it is done"

Ken

Bryan
13-07-2012, 10:34 AM
Careful that you don't fall over when they lengthen the leg, you'll be off balance for a little while. Very good luck to you Kenj, you'll be a new man.

Nick G
13-07-2012, 10:50 AM
<snip>
As grandaughter says.... "we will all be shouting 'hip, hip, hooray' when it is done"

Ken
Oh dear.

WalOne
13-07-2012, 11:16 AM
As grandaughter says.... "we will all be shouting 'hip, hip, hooray' when it is done"


:groan:

All the bestest of best wishes Ken, and here's hoping for a speedy recovery.

:)

SurferJoe46
13-07-2012, 02:59 PM
You are very fortunate to have a resolvable situation and doctors who will do it too.

My dad had both knees and both hips done and said it was the best of times for him afterward. He said he would NOT get a second one done if he had the first done alone though, either the hips or the knees in pairs.

The recovery time is the same and he said he was so glad that any discomfort from both is equal to the discomfort of one.

It might be in my genes, but I have non-resolvable hip degeneration, especially in the left one. They cannot replace the hip since there's no bone left which to attach it to. When it fails, I'll be down for good. Osteoporosis is typically not a male condition but I have some bad test numbers.

You are fortunate ------ even though it may not feel or appear to be so at the moment since an operation will make you better.

Prosper with your medical repair - it is amazing what they can do for antiques such as we now, huh?

pctek
13-07-2012, 03:28 PM
I am going in to Hawkes Bay Hospital for a new hip next Wednesday. I have Avascular Necrosis which the surgeon tells me is a bit different to Arthritis.


Yes, it is.
Arthritis is the loss of cartilage at the joints.
Yours is a blood flow problem.

Sympathies, I have arthritis which is bad enough.

I'm avoiding surgeons and replacements for as long as I can get away with, but from what I've read/heard, so long as you do the required after care there shouldn't be any complications.

A hassle from what I've seen, but in your case, a major improvement.

I do know one person who had it done, she became a posties after....did it for 5 years until she retired.

B.M.
13-07-2012, 03:29 PM
Iíve had both done, one twice because I somehow managed to shear off two of the three screws that held the socket into the pelvis and the socket tried to rotate around the remaining screw. That proved interesting because if the third screw had broken I figure the next stop for the actual hip was under my arm. :eek:

Then there was the first one where the surgeon managed to break his masonry bit whilst drilling out the bone to fit the spear of the ball joint. Fortunately he was close to where he wanted to go as there was no recovering it so he just left the broken end of his masonry bit where it was and cut a piece off the spear.

Itís more about engineering than it is about medicine so if youíre a little squirmy about the thought of hammers, saws, drills and blood I recommend a General Anaesthetic as well as an epidural.

Anyway, like the others have already said itís well worth it and youíll be very pleased you got it done.

There is one drawback however and that is Customs at the airport. Iím sure that bloody metal detector latches onto me when I leave the car park. :rolleyes:

Good luck. :thumbs:

Digby
13-07-2012, 03:30 PM
Wow
Best of luck, hope it goes well for you.
Four weeks !

Renmoo
13-07-2012, 08:47 PM
Good luck for the operation!

Will you be staying there for a couple of nights? May pop by for a visit.

kenj
13-07-2012, 10:10 PM
Probably till Sunday/Monday depending how I fare.

Ken

Whenu
13-07-2012, 11:20 PM
Best wishes Ken, hope all goes well

Iantech
14-07-2012, 01:04 AM
Good luck Ken, I remember my Dad having a replacement a few years back, took him a while to really be totally pain free from the op, but it was a great benefit to his mobility. The very best of luck and a speedy recovery.

R2x1
14-07-2012, 11:02 AM
Just remember that a fresh new hip doesn't automatically entitle you to overseas hip hop study tours.

Give it heaps while it's under warranty and you'll be kicking goals real soon.

John H
14-07-2012, 11:43 AM
(snip) Osteoporosis is typically not a male condition... (snip)

Hi SJ - sorry to hear of your travail, but I just wanted to challenge your above comment, because I understand it to be a common misconception rather than a fact. I have osteopenia, which is the forerunner to osteoporosis. Fortunately it was discovered by an alert surgeon when he was putting me back together after a bad motorbike accident in 1997, and though I have lost more than 2cm in height, the condition is largely controlled by the treatment I have received since its discovery.

My understanding is that both men and women lose calcium from their bones throughout their lifetime and both genders are susceptible to osteoporosis. The major difference is that men experience the loss in a gradual process over the years, whereas women have a very steep loss during menopause - the loss is so marked then that it is well known, and thus osteoporosis has come to be seen as a women's disorder. Men need to be aware that it can happen to them too, and if they experience symptoms like unexplained fractures (ie fractures from relatively minor causes) they need to have a bone scan.

John H
14-07-2012, 11:49 AM
Hi Ken - a number of my friends have had hip (and knee) replacements. In all cases, their life has been immeasurably better after recovery from the surgery. The recovery from a hip replacement seems to be far more straightforward (and less painful) than from a knee replacement (which requires lots of painful stretching exercises). One friend of mine had been told for a long time that she had serious back problems and she was in enormous pain, with very restricted movement and ability to get through the day. Once the hip replacement was done, all her so-called back problems disappeared - the problem had been wrongly diagnosed. Presumably her back problems came from compensating for the hip disorder.

Enjoy being pampered by the nurses, and look forward to a very enjoyable time after your recovery.

SurferJoe46
14-07-2012, 01:17 PM
Hi SJ - sorry to hear of your travail, but I just wanted to challenge your above comment, because I understand it to be a common misconception rather than a fact. I have osteopenia, which is the forerunner to osteoporosis. Fortunately it was discovered by an alert surgeon when he was putting me back together after a bad motorbike accident in 1997, and though I have lost more than 2cm in height, the condition is largely controlled by the treatment I have received since its discovery.

My understanding is that both men and women lose calcium from their bones throughout their lifetime and both genders are susceptible to osteoporosis. The major difference is that men experience the loss in a gradual process over the years, whereas women have a very steep loss during menopause - the loss is so marked then that it is well known, and thus osteoporosis has come to be seen as a women's disorder. Men need to be aware that it can happen to them too, and if they experience symptoms like unexplained fractures (ie fractures from relatively minor causes) they need to have a bone scan.

The female osteo as noticeable and diagnosable as it is seems to be exacerbated by the sudden loss of estrogen, whereas a male just slowly loses his testosterone levels on a long slope after the magic 36th year or so.

In either situation, one needs SOMEONE's hormones to keep bone density closer to original/norm. However testosterone is poison after a certain age point - with BPH and coronary disease and such.

So female hormones have come into vogue here in the US as a HRT treatment for males, with certain inhibitors to keep the side effects to a minimum.

John H
14-07-2012, 01:38 PM
@ SJ. Eeek.

Iantech
14-07-2012, 02:44 PM
So female hormones have come into vogue here in the US as a HRT treatment for males, with certain inhibitors to keep the side effects to a minimum.Side effects. :eek:

Refer Hazardous Materials Data Sheet.

zqwerty
14-07-2012, 11:23 PM
That's really very funny, thanks Iantech

SurferJoe46
15-07-2012, 02:24 AM
Side effects. :eek:

Refer Hazardous Materials Data Sheet.

Well ------yeah. Every 28 days your voice goes up an octave.

Nick G
15-07-2012, 10:42 AM
@Iantech
lol :thumbs:

gary67
15-07-2012, 10:45 AM
Brother in law has HRT as part of his cancer treatment. He gets hot flushes

SurferJoe46
15-07-2012, 10:46 AM
Brother in law has HRT as part of his cancer treatment. He gets hot flushes

Wow - he should cut back on the Tai food.

Renmoo
15-07-2012, 01:49 PM
I got a pharmacy education session on this coming Thursday evening @ the hospital. Will pop by (if it is still within their visiting hours) @ 8.30pm, possibly.

Jen
15-07-2012, 01:56 PM
Good luck with the operation Ken. :)

Renmoo
22-07-2012, 02:03 PM
Just realised that I forgot about the visit completely!

... Actually, just realised that I don't even know Kenj's last name in the first place. Will be tricky for me to find him in the hospital.

Hopefully the operation was a success, Ken.

Cheers :)

kenj
22-07-2012, 05:42 PM
Hi all..... Wow I came home today. What a difference. Op went well and I recovered quickly...out of bed the morning after, tottering a couple of steps, through to this morning where i did all my ablutions with no help from any of the nurses. My surgeon came by around 11am and said "you can go home Ken"

SWMBO picked me up and thats about all, except when I told her I felt (joke) like a new woman, She said..."well, you will have to pay for one" (her joke?)

A 6 to 8 week recovery and no rushing it.

Thanks for your support folks. It may seem like just words to some. but this thread gave me a nice warm feeling. Much appreciated.

Ken

PS Oooops, sorry Renmoo, never thought of it:blush:

Nick G
22-07-2012, 05:48 PM
Pleased to hear the op went well kenj :thumbs:

R.M.
22-07-2012, 06:07 PM
Op went well and I recovered quickly...out of bed the morning after, tottering a couple of steps, through to this morning where i did all my ablutions with no help from any of the nurses.


I told you....:) You were a bit slow - our lot get out of bed the day of surgery!

lakewoodlady
22-07-2012, 06:19 PM
Congrats on the new hip kenj! Take it easy for a few weeks, remember there is quite a lot of healing that has to happen on the inside bits you don't see.

LL

Paul.Cov
22-07-2012, 06:47 PM
Impressive recovery!

From the shots I've seen of the surgery it looks more like carpentry than surgery... right down to the chiselling, hammering and drilling.

Best wishes for the recovery, and I hope you enjoy a new leash on life.

SP8's
22-07-2012, 07:49 PM
Congratulations Ken ... good to hear it went well for you.

We will be expecting progress reports and only consider the operation a success when you can get your leg over ... :D

WalOne
22-07-2012, 08:17 PM
Impressive recovery!

Best wishes for the recovery, and I hope you enjoy a new leash on life.

+1 Except, I'll hope for a new lease on life. Unless of course you're into leashes :devil

All the best, Ken! :)

Paul.Cov
22-07-2012, 10:16 PM
+1 Except, I'll hope for a new lease on life. Unless of course you're into leashes :devil

Oops. Guess my mind was in the gutter again, huh?

mikebartnz
23-07-2012, 01:12 PM
Glad it went well. All the best Ken.