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John Calvert
02-07-2012, 09:36 PM
Hi All

This is totally off-topic for computers, but many web-savvy people visit here so I'm interested in picking their brains.

I've always been interested in DIY, carpentry, home-maintenance, etc. - but have been frustrated by living in small flats without any possibility of a workshop or even a yard. But now I have a real (albeit small) house with a front and back yard and a garage, and I'm gradually building up my tools and materials for new projects.

However, enthusiasm is a poor substitute for experience so I'm wondering if there is an active forum/bulletin board for "handy" NZers that I can go to for good advice. There are loads of foreign ones of course but the products and tools often have different names so I'd prefer a Kiwi one. It's a bit tricky to search for: "DIY website" brings up a million hits on how to build your own website, which is not what I had in mind!

stratex5
02-07-2012, 09:39 PM
Check this website out:

http://www.buildyourdream.co.nz/forum/index.php

:)

braindead
04-07-2012, 01:32 PM
Load of stuff here: http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/index.htm

pctek
04-07-2012, 04:05 PM
I've always been interested in DIY, carpentry, home-maintenance, etc. - but have been frustrated by living in small flats without any possibility of a workshop or even a yard. !
Most DIY people I know just l;eave tools and projects lying about the living room or spare room anyway..

The Error Guy
04-07-2012, 04:42 PM
When my mum came back from overseas there was 1/2 a morris engine on the kitchen table and a radiator in the bathroom. She wasn't too impressed about it though, that's what the garage is for she screams. Problem is the garage has too many unfinished projects in it :D

johcar
04-07-2012, 04:45 PM
When my mum came back from overseas there was 1/2 a morris engine on the kitchen table and a radiator in the bathroom. She wasn't too impressed about it though, that's what the garage is for she screams. Problem is the garage has too many unfinished projects in it :D

... unlike the kitchen and bathroom... :D

pctek
04-07-2012, 05:04 PM
We've had a Morris Oxford head on the lounge floor.
It did have newspaper under it.....

SP8's
04-07-2012, 05:14 PM
Just be aware that there are new regulations around what you can legally do yourself .... if it's just relining or paint & wallpaper, no worries ... if you want to take a wall down or put wider doors in an outside wall (for that indoor / outdoor flow) it will more than probably have to be done by a qualified tradesman as it's considered "structural" ... and of course that goes for plumbing & electrics as well, if you want insurance cover (you need a cert of compliance).

I do not believe there are any restrictions on the number of Morris Minor Motors allowed within the premises ... however ... if you intend breading them, then a call to local local VINZ or LTSA may be advisable .... :D

Billy T
04-07-2012, 06:40 PM
I do not believe there are any restrictions on the number of Morris Minor Motors allowed within the premises ... however ... if you intend breading them, then a call to local local VINZ or LTSA may be advisable .... :D

Mrs T only breads them if she plans to bake them, and AFAIK she has never bothered to consult VINZ or LTSA in relation to her culinary efforts.

Cheers

Billy 8-{) :D

B.M.
04-07-2012, 08:31 PM
There are many aspects to DIY. ;)

I needed some new shelves in my garage just after I moved into my place so went right about building them.

After I’d finished a very official looking gentleman arrives announcing he is the “Noise Abatement Officer” for the local Council.

He advises that he has had a complaint about the noise I’d been making. I showed him my handiwork and he scratched his head in disbelief enquiring “Is That It”.

Then the conversation went like this:

Sure is I advised, to which he was spitting tacks. Well he advised, your neighbour rang complaining that you had set up an industry in Residential “A” zoning and hearing her description I thought I’d better attend myself. We usually get Armourguard.

Oh dear, well I’m finished now.

Well you must have something else to cut up otherwise she’ll think she’s won and cause me more grief.

Ok I’ll cut some firewood. :thumbs:

And away he went never to be seen again.

As for the neighbour, well as the old saying goes “Good fences make good neighbours”. :D

Bobh
05-07-2012, 12:45 PM
A few years ago I had my house moved onto my section. To get the house signed off I needed to have entrances to the front and back doors. I decided to build a concrete path to the back door myself. I Googled concrete paths and diligently followed the instructions re removing soil, building boxing, mixing concrete in a barrow, pouring concrete, tamping and smoothing the concrete. I decided on not having too smooth a surface because we have frosts here in winter. I was lucky that I read that building regulations require the concrete to have a slant on it so that water run off the concrete path away from the house. When the Building Inspector came around he poured water on the path to ensure that the water ran away from the house. This was my first experience of working with concrete. It was lucky that I had done research beforehand. I was pleased with the results.

The front entrance was a bit trickier as it is higher off the ground. I had bought a kitset set of wooden steps from Mitre 10. The measurements for height were correct. I decided that it would need more than a few four inch nails to attach the steps to the house so I ended up hiring 'some bloke' who knew what he was doing. He charged about $800 to do the job but it was worth it. He knew a heap more about regulations and added things like reinforcing iron bars which made the steps more secure. The building inspector passed his handy work.

Drainage was another thing that I needed to learn about. My brother-in-law, a digger driver and the plumbers all gave me good advice. I used clay pipes. Before I put the drains in my backyard was like a swamp and gumboots were needed but now I can walk up to my back fence in slippers.

Winston001
05-07-2012, 01:48 PM
When looking for bits of information I've often ended up at Lifestyleblock. It isn't a specific DIY site but it does yield nuggets because the people on it usually want to solve problems themselves or at least find out where to go.

http://www.lifestyleblock.co.nz/lsb-forum/index.php

Bobh
05-07-2012, 02:51 PM
You could try the Bunnings website (http://www.bunnings.co.nz/learn-how-to-diy_how-to.aspx).

or the Mitre 10 website (http://www.mitre10.com.au/Planning-and-DIY/).

Mitre 10 do have DIY brochures in their stores.

John Calvert
06-07-2012, 10:47 PM
OK, thanks for all the suggestions and stories. Much appreciated.

No problems with compliance, noise, etc. as we're not talking anything structural (the house is rented), and I don't go much on noisy power-tools.

R2x1
06-07-2012, 11:05 PM
Noisy power tools? It's music.
Anyway, those pedal operated chainsaws are not so good when you get to the heavy stuff.