PDA

View Full Version : 32 bit v 64 bit



Vince
10-06-2012, 04:03 AM
Does 32 bit architecture have a future?

Should I spend the money to future-proof a new computer with 64 bit?

Trev
10-06-2012, 08:25 AM
Go 64 bit. Most if not all computers you buy these days are 64 bit. 32 bit is restricted to about 3gb of ram where as you can run something like 32gb of ram with 64 bit. Everything is also faster with 64 bit.
:)

Vince
10-06-2012, 08:52 AM
Thanks.

Now the next question.

paulw
10-06-2012, 09:07 AM
Depends if you have any legacy software. At work all our PCs use Win 7 32 bit for that reason. Some we have to leave at XP because some software like NaVision will not run on Win 7 of any flavor. At home I use 64 bit as I don't have any old software that won't run ..

Nomad
10-06-2012, 09:17 AM
For us, we have 1x 32bit PC b/c our prrinter/scanner does not work nor does our Navman. Bit of a hassle though to have 2 computers to print a document out.

pcuser42
10-06-2012, 09:55 AM
32 bit is restricted to about 3gb of ram where as you can run something like 32gb of ram with 64 bit.

The raw limit for a 64-bit OS is 2^64 bytes of RAM, or 17,179,869,184GB. The actual limit depends on your OS: for Windows 7 Professional and Ultimate, this limit is 192GB, which is still more than enough.


Everything is also faster with 64 bit.

Not necessarily. Only applications which benefit from large amounts of RAM will see an increase in performance, but 32-bit and applications that use little RAM will see little performance difference.


Depends if you have any legacy software.

Of course you could use XP Mode or dual-boot, and get the best of both OSs.

Nick G
10-06-2012, 04:04 PM
For legacy software, win7 pro lets you run xp mode.

Vince
10-06-2012, 04:33 PM
That is good to know.

johnd
10-06-2012, 05:19 PM
The raw limit for a 64-bit OS is 2^64 bytes of RAM, or 17,179,869,184GB. The actual limit depends on your OS: for Windows 7 Professional and Ultimate, this limit is 192GB, which is still more than enough.

Not sure that this is true? To my knowledge 64 bit CPUs have a 64bit data bus but usually only a 36 bit address bus - so 2^36 = 68,719,476,736Bytes. (68,719,476,736/ 1,073,741,824= 64GB).

pcuser42
10-06-2012, 05:38 PM
Not sure that this is true? To my knowledge 64 bit CPUs have a 64bit data bus but usually only a 36 bit address bus - so 2^36 = 68,719,476,736Bytes. (68,719,476,736/ 1,073,741,824= 64GB).

Then explain how Windows is able to use more memory than is addressable with 36 bits?

johnd
10-06-2012, 05:58 PM
Actually I was not quite up to date - some have a 44 bit address bus: 2^44 = 17,592,186,044,416 bytes = 7,592,186,044,416/ 1,073,741,824 = 16,384 GiB

Agent_24
10-06-2012, 11:40 PM
If you wish to run old 16-bit software in windows directly, you need 32-bit windows, as 64-bit windows can only emulate 32-bit, not 16-bit.

inphinity
11-06-2012, 10:52 AM
Not sure that this is true? To my knowledge 64 bit CPUs have a 64bit data bus but usually only a 36 bit address bus - so 2^36 = 68,719,476,736Bytes. (68,719,476,736/ 1,073,741,824= 64GB).

Even something old like AMD's original Athlon64 K8-series can address up to 1TB of RAM. Most current desktop CPUs can address up to 256TB of RAM (48-bit address space). I'm not aware of any consumer-level 64-bit desktop processor with less than 40-bit address space.

johnd
11-06-2012, 09:25 PM
Even something old like AMD's original Athlon64 K8-series can address up to 1TB of RAM. Most current desktop CPUs can address up to 256TB of RAM (48-bit address space). I'm not aware of any consumer-level 64-bit desktop processor with less than 40-bit address space.

Yep - partially corrected in my previous post - the main point is that 64 bit CPUs don't have a 64 bit address bus.